EMCrit Podcast - Critical Care and Resuscitation
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EMCrit Rant – Risk in Emergency Medicine

EMCrit Podcast - Critical Care and Resuscitation

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EMCrit Rant – Risk in Emergency Medicine

EMCrit Podcast - Critical Care and Resuscitation

Online Medical Education on Emergency Department (ED) Critical Care, Trauma, and Resuscitation

EMCrit Podcast - Critical Care and Resuscitation

Dr. David Schriger gave a fantastic lecture on risk in emergency medicine at the ALL LA Conference. If you have not heard it, go and listen now; it is vitally important to our specialty. This is a brief EMCrit rant on some of my thoughts on the lecture.

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