Marketplace Morning Report

Marketplace Morning Report Podcast

Get up to speed on the daily news first thing in the morning with Marketplace Morning Report. Hosted by David Brancaccio, Marketplace Morning Report keeps you informed on what you may have missed when you were sleeping, kicking off each weekday with a global business update from the BBC World Service in London. In less than ten minutes, you can start off your day with a recap of the top economic and business headlines with our daily news show and podcast. David Brancaccio brings you key news updates and economic happenings in real time throughout the morning. Catch Marketplace Morning Report live every Monday through Friday to get the latest news on the markets, money, jobs and innovation. David has been in broadcasting for more than three decades, serving as a longtime host for Marketplace and winner of both the DuPont-Columbia Award and George Foster Peabody Award. He and his team on PBS’s NOW won two Emmy Awards in 2008, as well as the 2009 Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Television Political Coverage. Marketplace Morning Report daily news podcasts are also available worldwide on platforms included Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.

September jobs report signals a recovery slowdown
Hiring came in lower than expected for last month, although the unemployment rate fell to 7.9%. Plus, continuing to watch markets as they react to news of President Trump’s positive COVID test. Also, a federal court says that, for now, the Trump administration cannot prevent people coming to the U.S. on certain work visas. And, colleges around the country are offering grants for research projects on anti-Black racism and committing to hire more professors with expertise in the study of race....

Trump’s positive COVID test sends markets tumbling
There are a lot of unanswered questions here, including whether the president is showing any symptoms. We’re tracking the latest. Plus, troubling trends for women in the workforce during the pandemic. And, teachers try crowdfunding to get COVID supplies for their classrooms....


The stock market enters another pandemic quarter riding high
Despite everything this year, U.S. stocks are overall doing well. We take a look at why. Plus, unemployment claims remain stubbornly high, as consumer spending slows. And, Disney+ rolls out GroupWatch for people who want to stream movies and shows together....

Is that a glimmer of federal coronavirus relief?
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin are set to talk today on a new coronavirus relief package. There are hints of forward movement. Plus, an outage for the Tokyo Stock Exchange. And, amid the legal battle over TikTok and WeChat, a look at the hurdles U.S. tech firms face in China....

Tokyo Stock Exchange halts trading
From the BBC World Service: A technical glitch stops trading for a full day on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Will Golden Week in China give domestic tourism a boost? A new book called “Bear Markets and Beyond” explores the wild world of financial jargon....


The final hour is upon us for tens of thousands of airline jobs
Airlines are warning of tens of thousands of layoffs coming soon if they don’t get more aid. Plus, if the private payroll numbers for September are any indication, this week’s jobs report could signal our economy is continuing to recover. And, who will get a safe COVID-19 vaccine when?...

Markets jittery after U.S. presidential debate
From the BBC World Service: Global markets struggle for direction after a fiery first debate. Will Africa be left behind if a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available? Venezuela highlights the huge impact of U.S. sanctions on its foreign currency earnings....


Relationships stuck on different sides of a COVID quarantine line
Some kinds of travel are restricted at the U.S.-Canada border for safety reasons. But for some couples, those restrictions have them choosing between keeping their jobs and seeing their loved ones. Plus, how are markets looking on the day of the first presidential debate?...

Storing a future COVID vaccine at more than 100 below zero
The supply chain for distributing a vaccine that works may depend on super-cold refrigerators. Plus, a suspected ransomware attack on the computers of Universal Health Services, one of largest hospital chains. And, an update on the still-struggling hotel industry....

India’s white-collar workers leave cities for hometowns
From the BBC World Service: Indian professionals migrate to their hometowns. Countries in East Asia and the Pacific region could see first rise in poverty in 20 years. President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines challenges Facebook over accounts linked to the nation’s police and military that were taken down....


Republicans and Democrats want to change immunity laws for internet companies
Although their reasons for why might differ, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have an interest in rolling back legal immunity for internet platforms. Plus, gun sales in the U.S. have been way up, but the nation’s oldest gun-maker filed for bankruptcy. And, attention to the U.S. tax code after reporting on President Trump’s returns reveals how little he has paid....

Trump paid little to no income tax for more than a decade
In-depth reporting from The New York Times finds President Trump paid only $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017. We take a closer look. Plus, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says a deal could still be reached with the White House on new coronavirus relief money. And, preparing for the first presidential debate this week. What will we hear about the economy?...


Wall Street’s guesses about the election and markets
President Trump’s recent unwillingness to comment on a peaceful transfer of power has constitutional experts worried … and also stock market strategists. Uncertainty tends to mean market volatility. Plus, how local businesses that depend on the economy of college sports are faring....

What banks are doing (and not doing) about dirty money
It’s one of the biggest stories of the week: leaked documents show that some of the biggest of banks kept doing business with high-level crooks, even though their own internal review systems had flagged suspicious transactions. We take a closer look. Plus, House Democrats are working on a new spending package for COVID-19 relief. And, why one of the most powerful officials in the Vatican abruptly resigned....

Harley-Davidson is leaving India
From the BBC World Service: The European Union is set to appeal Apple’s $15 billion tax bill ruling. Harley-Davidson has decided to end its manufacturing operations in India. The Olympics will go ahead but in a simplified form....


Nuclear energy’s 30-year low
The number of nuclear plants running everywhere on Earth is at the lowest point in three decades. Why? Plus, pleas for Congress to do more in terms of coronavirus relief, as 870,000 more people have signed up for unemployment benefits. And, a status update on auto industry reopenings in Mexico....

Why working from home can still mean going into an office
From the BBC World Service: The next Brexit deadline is looming and it’s making businesses jittery, again. The growth of suburban work-from-home spaces. Australia’s second-biggest bank is fined more than $900 million for breaches of money-laundering laws....


A dollar amount on how much racism has cost the U.S.
A colossal number: $16 trillion. That’s the economic loss suffered over 20 years due to racism in the U.S., according to a new study by Citigroup. Plus, the strength of spenders in this economy. And, fixing how we pay for long-term health care....

Can machines predict who will win the House and Senate?
The Economist has two new forecasting models out Wednesday morning that will attempt to do just that. Plus, what’s caused Tesla’s stock to collapse. And, how Texas is trying to make it easier for some to avoid surprise medical bills....

Europe’s new plan for hosting refugees
From the BBC World Service: The European Union is set to detail new, mandatory measures on managing migration. Australia reveals encouraging manufacturing data. How the craft beer industry is faring during the coronavirus pandemic....


Voting is already difficult enough for people who are homeless
The pandemic is making it that much harder. Plus, how much of recent stock market gains can be attributed to faith in a COVID-19 vaccine. Also, a preview of Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s message on COVID-19 relief, and details on Tesla’s new battery for electric cars. And, political fundraising ticks up amid the Supreme Court battle....

Working for peanuts in this COVID economy
Peanut consumption in the U.S. is at an all-time high. Peanut prices have continued to climb. It’s keeping the industry busy. Plus, the Fed looks to update the rules that ensure lower-income Americans get access to loans. And, Trump revisits the issue of social media companies with state attorneys general....

How will Europe’s economies cope with new COVID restrictions?
From the BBC World Service: The economic fallout from new restrictions in the U.K. and Spain. The European Union’s top court upholds France’s right to block repeated short-term property rentals. Clothes designer Erdem Moralioglu describes his fully digital London Fashion Week show....


Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s economic legacy
The late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves a legacy of rulings that defined many crucial areas of American life, including economic issues. Plus, evidence of a sweeping dirty money scandal among global banks. And, the latest on TikTok....

Big banks caught up in dirty money scandal
From the BBC World Service: Leaked documents reveal that criminals allegedly used a number of global banks to move about $2 trillion of dirty money around the world. Indian farmers protest new legislation which could end minimum support prices for certain crops....


Digital divide could keep Black and Hispanic people out of future jobs
A directive at Facebook coming from Mark Zuckerberg himself is set to curb political talk on the company’s internal messaging network. It’s a crackdown ahead of the election. Plus, current and future racial inequities caused by unequal access to technology and training....

Could England face a second lockdown?
From the BBC World Service: The U.K. government is considering a second lockdown in England after a spike in coronavirus cases. Also, the path to a vaccine, from the head of a pharmaceutical manufacturing organization in Europe. And, a sightseeing flight to nowhere in Australia....


How do you advertise a COVID vaccine?
One explanation for an early sell-off Thursday on Wall Street is the recent gloomy assessment of the economy offered by the Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell. Plus, what’s being called the biggest sofware IPO of all time. And, the trust issue and skepticism that come with a potential COVID-19 vaccine....

Last call for passengers on Europe’s first “COVID-free” flight
From the BBC World Service: Italy is launching what it’s calling the first “COVID-free” flights in Europe, where passengers can only board once they’ve taken a coronavirus test at the airport. Also, India’s controversial decision to spend billions of dollars upgrading its Parliament building at the height of the pandemic. And, the British retailer fed up with video calls....

What the Fed can’t do
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell offered a dreary assessment of the economy after his policymaking team’s last interest rate meeting before the elections. The Fed plans to keep interest rates near zero through 2023. But it’s kind of limited beyond that. And, how homebuilders are trying to recruit more workers amid growing demand for new houses....


Trump’s controversial pick for the Fed might not make it
Where did Americans spend their money in August? We have the latest data. Plus, A top Senate Republican says Federal Reserve Board nominee Judy Shelton does not have enough votes for confirmation. And, this notion of the “right” COVID-19 vaccine. What does it look like?...

Boeing, FAA did not really understand the faulty 737 Max, Congress finds
A congressional report blasts both Boeing and the FAA for actions that led to two fatal crashes of the 737 Max jets. Plus, why people are voluntarily quitting their jobs in a pandemic. And, a new California law that will make it easier for the formerly incarcerated to become firefighters or EMTs....

Have we reached “peak oil”? BP’s CEO thinks maybe.
From the BBC World Service: BP CEO Bernard Looney explains his plans to shift the company’s focus away from oil and gas and toward shale, green energy and renewables. Also, the push for European battery production for electric vehicles. And, will consumers really trust fallen travel giant Thomas Cook under new owners?...


The clock of global progress seems to be spinning backward
What will the holiday shopping season look like? A new analysis suggests numbers could actually be up. Plus, why Apple might be waiting to unveil a new iPhone model. Also, another automaker settles over emissions cheating. And, Bill Gates on coronavirus vaccine development....

How to fight the pandemic, from someone who has done this before
The Federal Open Market Committee meets again this week. It’s not expected to change interest rates, so what can we expect? Plus, Dr. Larry Brilliant, an epidemiologist, brings his experience of helping to eradicate smallpox to our current pandemic....

Bill Gates warns of vaccine worries for developing nations
From the BBC World Service: Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates has warned that richer countries aren’t doing enough to make sure a potential coronavirus vaccine is available for developing nations. Also, Greg Kelly, the former Nissan executive and ally of former CEO Carlos Ghosn, pleads not guilty to financial misconduct charges in Tokyo court. And, fears that the U.K.’s furlough plan for workers could be ending too soon....


Nicki Minaj, Tracy Chapman and the future of music copyright law
TikTok wants to join forces with Oracle — but it’s not exactly a sale like the Trump administration ordered. Plus, speaking of executive orders, the president has signed one aimed at lowering drug prices for Medicare. And, Tracy Chapman is suing Nicki Minaj in a case that could upend the way artists borrow from each other....

TikTok twist: China warns of no sale of its U.S. business
From the BBC World Service: The status of TikTok’s U.S. operations is uncertain as China looks set to block any sale to a U.S. tech firm. But is a partnership happening instead? Also, another geopolitical tech row over the planned sale of the U.K. chip designer Arm to U.S. firm Nvidia. And, Yoshihide Suga is set to take over as Japan’s new prime minister....

The video game tech company that’s no longer just playing around
Nvidia, which makes microchips for video games, is buying Arm Holdings — a quietly ubiquitous tech company. We’ll get to why this is such a big deal for things like smartphones. Plus, TikTok, Oracle and President Donald Trump. And, the potential for global cooperation when it comes to distributing a future COVID-19 vaccine....


New York City stares down COVID recovery on the anniversary of 9/11
CItigroup announces that Jane Fraser will become its CEO in February. She’ll be the first woman in charge of a global megabank. We dive into New York City’s COVID recovery on the anniversary of 9/11. Also, even in a pandemic, smoking in casinos is still a thing – and a gamble in itself....



Food insecurity goes global under the cloud of COVID-19
Susan Schmidt stops in to discuss some of the unanswered market questions as we take stock of the rest of the year. Then, we talk about representation and inclusion standard at the Oscars. Peleton is adjusting its price strategy ahead of the holidays. We then delve into how food insecurity has a worldwide grip....

Can Broadway learn lessons from theater in South Korea?
From the BBC World Service: British performers have joined a musical with a socially distanced audience in Seoul. Shares fall after drug maker AstraZeneca pauses its COVID-19 vaccine trials. Pandemic lockdowns threaten starvation for over 120 million people....


COVID-19 concerns hang over reopening child care centers
The president pledges to crack down on companies that create jobs in China. Also, child care centers are weighing the pros and cons of reopening. Then. as the “Star Trek” franchise turns 54, we examine if decades-long runs for shows can still be a thing in the streaming age....

Will the U.S. ban cotton from China over human rights concerns?
From the BBC World Service: Pressure is mounting on businesses to ensure materials sourced from factories in Xinjiang do not involve forced labor. Can Japan’s next leader tackle a significant decline in business spending? Beijing unveils its approach to global data-security standards....


Are you ready for some football economics?
OPEC is about to turn 60. Also, a look at the economics of empty NFL stadiums as the season nears its beginning. We then talk to the host of a home improvement show geared toward low-income households....

Erika Alexander talks about the good trouble of “Living Single”
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi apparently have a deal on an emergency spending bill. We also talk to Erika Alexander, co-producer of the John Lewis documentary “Good Trouble” and the actress who played Maxine Shaw on “Living Single,” the ‘90s sitcom that had a generational impact on Black women....


The jobs picture improved again in August
But let’s take a look at where the gains came from. Also, a stock sell-off Thursday, headlined by tech companies. It was the biggest dip since June. And, a plan from the U.K. government to give companies cash for hiring young people who are unemployed....

Inside that sharp drop in U.S. tech stocks
The tech giants that have led market rallies since the pandemic lows of March had a rough Thursday. Let’s put that in perspective. Plus, state revenues are down, foreshadowing layoffs. And, why we’re seeing more demand for industrial real estate — the kind of place where you might put, say, an Amazon distribution warehouse....

Calls for European sanctions on Russia after fierce Putin critic poisoned
From the BBC World Service: More than 100 members of the European Parliament have signed a letter calling for economic sanctions against Russia, and for the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline from Russia to Europe to be scrapped, after the poisoning of one of President Vladimir Putin’s fiercest critics, Alexei Navalny. Also, curating some of the world’s most famous works in an online museum....


The giant federal deficit, approaching WWII levels
U.S. federal debt looks a lot like it did in 1946. Also, another 880,000 people signed up for jobless benefits. It’s a lot, but seems down from 1 million claims a week earlier. Yet that is a false comparison. And, KFC is caught between the Trump administration and Chinese tech companies....

How some people might get a coronavirus vaccine this fall
New guidance from the Centers for Disease Control asks states to be prepared for initial doses of a coronavirus vaccine within a couple of months, just before election time. Plus, a run on aluminum is hitting the beverage industry hard. And, parents facing the uncertainty of fall balancing back to school with work....

How did KFC get caught in the U.S. crackdown on Chinese tech?
From the BBC World Service: KFC in China could become caught up in U.S. sanctions on transactions made using Chinese tech firms. U.S.-listed Yum Brands China could get caught up with President Trump’s planned sanctions on the social media app WeChat, which is widely used to pay for meals in the company’s restaurants across China. Also, France’s 100-billion-euro stimulus bill with a green focus. And, the U.K. plan aimed to get younger people back into work, where companies hire and the government pays....


Can you decide whether to go on payroll tax holiday?
Many employers aren’t participating in the temporary payroll tax cut, but what choice do employees have in whether to keep more of the tax money that normally goes to Social Security? Plus, private payroll growth for August is short of expectations. And, normally buzzing during the summer, St. Tropez struggles with the pandemic....

Australia’s “wonder down under” economy falls into recession
From the BBC World Service: The pandemic has done what even the financial crisis couldn’t and pushed Australia’s “wonder down under” economy into recession for the first time in 30 years. And, could boredom actually help us get more creative at work?...

A new federal directive to keep renters in their homes
The Trump administration Tuesday evening put out a directive to stop property owners from evicting some tenants amid the pandemic. We have the details. Plus, COVID-19 liability waivers for students returning to campus. And, all the time and money people are saving by not commuting to the office....


Gloves are off between Facebook and the Australian government
From the BBC World Service: Facebook has threatened to stop users in Australia from sharing news content if the government there introduces a law forcing the social media platform to pay publishers for their articles. And, as the U.K. government’s furlough scheme for workers hit by the pandemic begins to wind down, there’s warnings it could lead to a tidal wave of job losses....

The best August for the S&P 500 since 1986
Over a million more people filed for unemployment in the most recent week, and consumer confidence is at a six-year low. And then there’s the soaring stock market. Plus, people living off their savings suffer in times of low interest rates, like right now. And, Delta and American Airlines follow United’s lead in canceling fees for changing domestic flight tickets....


Trump’s temporary payroll tax cut is set to begin tomorrow
The Trump administration’s temporary cut in payroll tax is set to begin on Sept. 1. But how many employers will participate? Plus, United Airlines is canceling fees on most domestic flight changes. And, France’s plan to get its citizens traveling again....

The grassroots organizations of the gig economy
You probably tend to think of ride-hailing services or food delivery when you think of the gig economy. But others want to do things differently. Plus, new export rules from the Chinese government and what that means for TikTok. And, is Zoom’s success sustainable?...

New Chinese law complicates TikTok sale
From the BBC World Service: China’s foreign ministry says Beijing must sign off on any deal that involves the sale of TikTok’s U.S. arm. The first commercial flight from Israel to the UAE is taking place today. And, how the coronavirus is impacting India’s Silicon Valley....


The hunt for missing inflation
The Federal Reserve announces it will tolerate slightly higher levels of inflation. Plus, a failed cybersecurity attack on a Tesla factory. Also, the pandemic has complicated emergency response efforts for those evacuating to escape Hurricane Laura. And, pro athletes agitate for social change....

The RNC and DNC talked about two very different economies
At both conventions, the economy figured prominently. But what’s the reality of where it’s at and where it’s headed? Plus, blackouts in California point to another reality: The entire U.S. has an old electric grid in need of upgrades....

Japan’s prime minister resigns for health reasons
From the BBC World Service: Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has announced his resignation, citing health reasons which he said could get in the way of decision-making. And, some unconventional ways to take the stress off during the pandemic....


Another million people filed for unemployment
Weekly initial jobless claims have been below 1 million just once in the past five months. That, combined with a drop in consumer confidence, spells trouble for this economic recovery. Plus, how many people are also losing health insurance when they lose their jobs? And, the latest on Hurricane Laura, and how the pandemic compounds the problems for those affected....

Another million Americans filed for unemployment
Weekly initial jobless claims have been below 1 million just once in the past five months. That, combined with a drop in consumer confidence, spells trouble for this economic recovery. Plus, how many people are also losing health insurance when they lose their jobs? And, the latest on Hurricane Laura, and how the pandemic compounds the problems for those affected....

Where are the unemployed turning to for health insurance?
Today we get an update on how many people filed for unemployment last week. These folks are losing their incomes, and likely their health insurance, too. Plus, TikTok’s CEO is leaving. And, what it’s like doing business between the U.S. and China right now....


TikTok boss quits after 3 months
From the BBC World Service: TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer has quit just months after taking the job, ahead of an impending U.S. ban. The EU’s trade commissioner, Phil Hogan, has also resigned, after the Irish government accused him of breaching COVID-19 guidelines. And, Trump’s promise to bring 1 million jobs back from China....

TikTok boss quits after 3 months
From the BBC World Service: TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer has quit just months after taking the job, ahead of an impending U.S. ban. The EU’s trade commissioner, Phil Hogan, has also resigned, after the Irish government accused him of breaching COVID-19 guidelines. And, Trump’s promise to bring 1 million jobs back from China....

Why investors have nowhere to go but the stock market
The Fed is expected to let inflation get higher than get higher than normal in the future. Which means it wouldn’t raise interest rates. What does that mean for investors? Plus, Teva Pharmaceuticals is accused of raising the costs of widely used drugs. Also, how much progress the U.S. and China have made on their trade deal. And, how Trump’s plan to put off payroll taxes could contribute to the depletion Social Security benefits....