Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast Podcast

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Greenland's ice will melt faster than any time in the past 12,000 years
How current and future ice loss in Greenland compares to the past, and using graphene to make ultra-sensitive radiation detectors.In this episode:00:45 Greenland’s historic ice lossClimate change is accelerating the loss of ice and glaciers around the world leading to unprecedented levels of disappearance. Researchers have drilled samples from deep in the Greenland ice sheet, to model how current, and future, losses compare to those seen in the last 12,000 years. Research Article: Briner et al.; News and Vi...

After decades of trying, scientists coax plastic particles into a diamond-like structure
Coaxing tiny colloid particles into a diamond structure, and manipulating cell death and homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease.In this episode:00:45 Creating colloidal crystalsFor decades, researchers have attempted to create crystals with a diamond-like structure using tiny colloid particles. Now, a team thinks they’ve cracked it, which could open the door for new optical technologies. Research Article: He et al.07:50 CoronapodRapid antigen tests for coronavirus have been described in some circles as ‘g...

Genes chart Vikings' spread across Europe
Mapping the migration of the Vikings, and the world’s smallest ultrasound device.In this episode:00:45 Following the Viking footprint across EuropeTo better understand who the Vikings were, and where they went, researchers have mapped genomes from hundreds of archaeological artifacts. Research Article: Margaryan et al.08:00 CoronapodPhase III trials of a leading coronavirus vaccine were abruptly paused last week – we discuss how news of the event leaked out, and the arguments for transparency in clinical tr...


A new way to cool computer chips — from within
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.In this episode:00:46 Cool computersKeeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool. Research Article: van Erp et al.06:57 CoronapodBy comparing coronavirus genomes taken from people around the world, researchers are getting an idea of how SARS-CoV...

Revealed: A clearer view of how general anaesthetics actually work
Engineering yeast to produce medicines, and the mechanism of anaesthetic action.In this episode:00:44 Making medicine with yeastThe tropane alkaloids are an important class of medicine, but they are produced agriculturally leaving them vulnerable to extreme weather and world events. Now, researchers have engineered yeast to produce these important molecules. Research Article: Srinivasan and Smolke06:36 CoronapodWe discuss the complex story of immunity to COVID-19, and how this may affect vaccine development...

The challenge of reproducing results from ten-year-old code
Protecting delicate quantum bits, and a competition to replicate findings from ancient computer code.In this episode:01:04 Quantum computers vs ionizing radiationThe quantum bits, or ‘qubits’, central to the operation of quantum computers are notoriously sensitive. Now, researchers have assessed the damaging effects that ionizing radiation can have on these qubits and what can be done about it. Research Article: Vepsäläinen et al.08:15 CoronapodWe discuss the US Food and Drug Administration’s decision to au...


3D-printing some of the world's lightest materials
A new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids.In this episode:01:05 Printing aerogelsAerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common form of aerogel, opening up a range of potential new applications. Research Article: Zhao et al.07:00 CoronapodTo provide targeted public health interventions during...

3D-printing some of the world's lightest materials
A new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids.In this episode:01:05 Printing aerogelsAerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common form of aerogel, opening up a range of potential new applications. Research Article: Zhao et al.07:00 CoronapodTo provide targeted public health interventions during...

The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde
Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize.In this episode:01:56 Understanding swarming behaviourSwarms of migratory locusts regularly devastate crops across the world, but why these swarms form has been a mystery. Now, a team of researchers have identified a compound that causes solitary locusts to come together in their billions - a finding that could have practical applications for preventing this behaviour. Research article: Guo et al.; News & Views: Catching ...


Audio long-read: Pluto’s dark side is overflowing with secrets
In 2015, after a nine-and-a-half-year journey, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft raced past Pluto, beaming images of the dwarf planet back to Earth.Five years after the mission, researchers are poring over images of Pluto’s far-side, which was shrouded in shadow during New Horizon’s flypast. They hope that these images will help give a better understanding of how Pluto was born and even whether a hidden ocean resides beneath the world’s icy crust.This is an audio version of our feature: Pluto’s dark side spill...

Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA.In this episode:01:06 Stretching skinFor decades it’s been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin07:49 CoronapodWe discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings...

When did people arrive in the Americas? New evidence stokes debate
New evidence may push back the date on human arrival to the Americas, and an examination of science’s flaws.In this episode:00:59 Ancient AmericansTwo papers suggest that humans were present in the Americas thousands of years before many people have thought. We examine the evidence. Research Article: Ardelean et al.; Research Article: Becerra-Valdivia and Higham; News and Views: Evidence grows that peopling of the Americas began more than 20,000 years ago10:44 CoronapodWe discuss the latest results from vac...


Graphene’s magic angle reveals a new twist
Probing the superconducting properties of graphene and bacteria that can use manganese to grow.01:15 Magic angle grapheneIf you sandwich two sheets of graphene together and twist one in just the right way, it can gain some superconducting properties. Now, physicists have added another material to this sandwich which stabilises that superconductivity, a result that may complicate physicists’ understanding of magic angles. Research Article: Arora et al.08:22 CoronapodWith evidence mounting that SARS-CoV2 can ...

Coronapod: Massive coronavirus outbreak strikes iconic Californian prison after it rejected expert aid
In this episode:01:47 Disaster in San QuentinSan Quentin prison is facing a massive outbreak, we dig into how they got there. The crisis has arisen despite warnings from experts, and offers of free tests, which were declined. We ask why? And what can be done now?News: California's San Quentin prison declined free coronavirus tests and urgent advice — now it has a massive outbreak29:51 One good thingFor the last episode of Coronapod, our hosts pick out ways that the pandemic has changed them for the better, ...

The six-year-old space agency with hopes for Mars
On this week’s podcast, an ambitious Mars mission from a young space agency, and how crumbling up rocks could help fight climate change.In this episode:00:46 Mars hopesIn a few weeks the UAE’s first mission to Mars is due to launch. We speak to the mission leads to learn about the aims of the project, and how they developed the mission in under six years. News Feature: How a small Arab nation built a Mars mission from scratch in six years; News Feature: Countdown to Mars: three daring missions take aim at t...


Coronapod: Lessons from pandemic ‘war-game’ simulations
Next week, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show.In this episode:02:15 Simulating pandemicsResearchers have run numerous military-style simulations to predict the consequences of fictitious viral outbreaks. We discuss how these simulations work, what recommendations come out of them and if any of these warnings have been heeded.24:08 One good thingOur hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, incl...

What the atomic structure of enamel tells us about tooth decay
On this week’s podcast, how the molecular structure of tooth enamel may impact decay, and a mysterious planetary core from a half-formed gas giant.In this episode:00:46 Unravelling tooth enamelResearchers have been looking into the structure and composition of enamel in an effort to better understand tooth decay. Research Article: DeRocher et al.07:02 Research HighlightsAn adhesive patch to help heal heart-attacks, and a new technique to inspect the structure of 2D ‘wonder materials’. Research Highlight: A ...

Coronapod: The state of the pandemic, six months in
In a few weeks, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show.In this episode:03:13 What have we learnt?We take a look back over the past six months of the pandemic, and discuss how far the world has come. It’s been a period of turmoil and science has faced an unprecedented challenge. What lessons can be learned from the epidemic so far to continue the fight in the months to come?Financial Times: Coronavirus tracked: the latest ...


How playing poker can help you make decisions
On this week’s podcast, life lessons from poker, and keeping things civil during peer review.In this episode:00:44 Deciding to play pokerWhen writer Maria Konnikova wanted to better understand the human decision making process, she took a rather unusual step: becoming a professional poker player. We delve into her journey and find out how poker could help people make better decisions. Books and Arts: What the world needs now: lessons from a poker player09:12 Research HighlightsA sweaty synthetic skin that c...

Coronapod: Dexamethasone, the cheap steroid that could cut coronavirus deaths
In this episode:00:37 Lessons from the Ebola outbreakWe get an update on the pandemic response in the African countries still reeling from the 2014 Ebola crisis. Resource strapped and under pressure – can the lessons learned from Ebola help keep the coronavirus under control?15:32 Dexamethasone, a breakthrough drug?A UK-based drugs trial suggests that a cheap steroid could cut deaths by a third among the sickest COVID patients. We discuss what this could mean for the pandemic.News: Coronavirus breakthrough:...

Incest in the elite of Neolithic Ireland
This week, researchers make diamonds tough, and evidence of incest in a 5,000 year old tomb.In this episode:00:51 Tough versus hardDiamonds are famed for their hardness, but they are not so resistant to fracture. Now, researchers have toughened up diamonds, which could open up new industrial applications. Research Article: Yue et al.06:07 Research HighlightsA spacecraft helps physicists work out the lifespan of a neutron, and the icy hideaway of an endangered whale. Research Highlight: The vanishing-neutron...


Long Read Podcast: Enigmatic neutron stars may soon give up their secrets
An instrument on the International Space Station is providing new insights into some of the Universe’s most baffling objects.Neutron stars have puzzled scientists for decades. It’s known that these ultra-dense objects are born from the remnants of supernovae, yet what’s under their surface, and what processes that go on within them, remain a mystery.Now, an instrument called the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer is providing new information to help answer these questions, ushering in a new era of r...

Coronapod: The Surgisphere scandal that rocked coronavirus drug research
In this episode:00:52 Testing disparitiesAs testing capacities increase, it is clear that not everyone has equal access. But grassroots organisations are trying to correct this inequity. We hear about one researcher’s fight to get testing to those below the poverty line in California.09:04 The hydroxychloroquine saga continuesAs a high profile study in the Lancet is retracted, the first data from clinical trials is coming in and it is not encouraging. We discuss the murky future of hydroxychloroquine as a C...

The quantum space lab
This week, the spaceborne lab that allows investigation of quantum states, and the debate surrounding how mountain height is maintained.Shutdown StemOn the tenth of June, Nature joined #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives.Podcast: #ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcasthttps://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black livesIn this episode:01:18 Space labScientists have built a lab on the international spac...


#ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcast
On the tenth of June, Nature will be joining #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. We will be educating ourselves and defining actions we can take to help eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM . Please join us.https://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Coronapod: The heavy toll on people of colour
In this episode:00:45 Black Lives MatterThe killing of George Floyd, a black man, by police in Minnesota has sent a shockwave of anger around the globe. As unrest continues, we discuss the protests in Washington DC and ask how scientists are reacting.04:01 The outsized toll of covid-19 on people of colourReports from around the globe are showing that ethnic minorities are at much higher risk of infection and death from the coronavirus. But why might that be? And what can be done about it?News: How to addres...

Lab-made skin grows its own hair
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis.In this episode:00:45 Hairy SkinResearchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News and Views: Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness08:56 Research HighlightsHow mercury moved during the ‘Great Dying’, and the link between mobil...


Coronapod: The divisive hydroxychloroquine study that's triggering mass confusion
00:59 Chloroquine on rocky groundPresident Trump's preferred coronavirus treatment is the focus of a new study suggesting it could cause more harm than good, but not everybody agrees. We discuss the fallout as trials around the world are paused and countries diverge over policy advice.News: India expands use of controversial coronavirus drug amid safety concernsNews: Safety fears over hyped drug hydroxychloroquine spark global confusion12:12 Are we rushing science?Coronavirus papers are being published extr...

Super-efficient catalyst boosts hopes for hydrogen fuel
This week, perfecting catalysts that split water using light, and the mystery of missing matter in the Universe.In this episode:00:44 Water splittingAfter decades of research scientists have managed to achieve near perfect efficiency using a light-activated catalyst to separate hydrogen from water for fuel. Research Article: Takata et al.; News and Views: An almost perfectly efficient light-activated catalyst for producing hydrogen from water05:37 Research HighlightsThe hidden water inside the earth’s core,...

Coronapod: Hope and caution greet vaccine trial result, and Trump vs the WHO
01:38 Trump vs the WHOPresident Trump has given the WHO an ultimatum in a tweet, threatening to pull out of the organisation within 30 days unless unclear demands are met. We discuss what this means for the pandemic, the USA and the future of international health cooperation.12:06 Where are we with vaccines?The first results from vaccine trials are in and they are encouraging, but scientists are still urging caution. We hear the lowdown on the types of vaccines being developed and what hope there is of roll...


A synthetic eye that 'sees' like a human
This week, crafting an artificial eye with the benefits of a human's, and understanding how disk-galaxies formed by peering back in time.In this episode:00:45 Biomimetic eyeResearchers fabricate an artificial eye complete with a human-like retina. Research Article: Gu et al.; News and Views: Artificial eye boosted by hemispherical retina09:27 Research HighlightsDazzling elephant seals to avoid predation, and helping blind people ‘see’ through brain stimulation. Research Highlight: Mighty seals humbled by pr...

Coronapod: The misinformation pandemic, and science funding fears
With questionable coronavirus content flooding airwaves and online channels, what’s being done to limit its impact? In this episode: 00:57 The epidemiology of misinformationAs the pandemic spreads, so does a tidal wave of misinformation and conspiracy theories. We discuss how researchers' are tracking the spread of questionable content, and ways to limit its impact.News: Anti-vaccine movement could undermine efforts to end coronavirus pandemic, researchers warnNature Video: Infodemic: Coronavirus and the fa...

The super-sleuth who spots trouble in science papers, and the puzzle of urban smog
This week, Elisabeth Bik tells us about her work uncovering potential image manipulation, and a new route for particulate pollution formation.In this episode:00:45 Seeing doubleElisabeth Bik spends her days identifying duplicated images in science papers. She tells us about her efforts, and why they’re important. Feature: Meet this super-spotter of duplicated images in science papers; News: Publishers launch joint effort to tackle altered images in research papers08:11 Research HighlightsNew insights on the...


Coronapod: The dangers of ignoring outbreaks in homeless shelters, plus coronavirus and drug abuse
Outbreaks among those unable to isolate are spreading under the radar. We hear about the researchers scrambling to get a handle on the situation.In this episode:01:02 How is coronavirus spreading in group settings?In order to successfully stop the coronavirus pandemic, researchers have to understand how the virus is spreading among groups unable to isolate. We hear about efforts to uncover levels of infection among homeless populations in the US, and the challenges associated with doing so.News: Ignoring ou...

07 May 2020: Galileo and the science deniers, and physicists probe the mysterious pion
This week, a new way to study elusive subatomic particles - pions, and the story of Galileo remains relevant in a time of modern science denialism.In this episode:00:46 Probing pionsPions are incredibly unstable and difficult-to-study subatomic particles. Now researchers have come up with a clever way to examine them - by sticking them into helium atoms. Research Article: Hori et al.08:28 Research HighlightsA colourful way to cool buildings, and the rapid expansion of cities. Research Highlight: A rainbow o...

Coronapod: What use are contact tracing apps? And new hopes for coronavirus drug remdesivir
The Coronapod team pick through the latest news, plus we hear from the researchers making lemonade out of lockdown lemons.In this episode:01:10 Can contact-tracing apps help?Governments around the world are banking on smartphone apps to help end the spread of the coronavirus. But how effective might these apps might be? What are the risks? And how should they fit into wider public health strategies?Editorial: Show evidence that apps for COVID-19 contact-tracing are secure and effective13:30 Antiviral remdes...


30 April 2020: A sniff test for consciousness, and how to cut antibiotics use — with vaccines
This week, how the ‘sniff-response’ can help clinicians determine a patient's state of consciousness, and how vaccines could help drive down antibiotic use.In this episode:00:45 Sniffing out consciousnessResearchers have found that the sniff reflex can indicate whether a patient is in a vegetative state, and even the likelihood that they will recover consciousness. Research Article: Arzi et al.08:37 Research HighlightsThe stupefying effect of carbon dioxide, and a chameleon gemstone that tricks your eyes. R...

Coronapod: The race to expand antibody testing
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the role of antibody tests in controlling the pandemic, and how public-health spending could curtail an economic crisis. Also on the show, the open hardware community's efforts to produce medical equipment.In this episode:02:08 Betting on antibodiesAntibody tests could play a key role in understanding how the virus has spread through populations, and in ending lockdowns. We discuss concerns over their reliability, how they could be used, and the tantalis...

23 April 2020: Denisovan DNA in modern Europeans, and the birth of an unusual celestial object
This week, evidence of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes, and the origin of a snowman-shaped object at the edge of the solar system.In this episode:00:45 Intermixing of ancient homininsBy combing through the DNA of over 27,000 modern day Icelanders, researchers have uncovered new insights about the ancient hominin species who interbred with Homo sapiens. Research Article: Skov et al.08:05 Research HighlightsThe scent of lemur love, a hidden Viking trade route, and ‘gargantuan’ hail. Research Highl...


Coronapod: Troubling news
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss Trump withholding funds from the WHO, and how COVID-19 kills. We also hear about controlling misinformation while communicating risk.In this episode:01:15 Understanding bottlenecksAfter listening to last week's episode of Coronapod, researchers in the USA were inspired to start collecting data about the challenges facing labs carrying out testing. After more than 4,000 responses to their online survey, we discuss their goals.03:08 A hole in the WHO’s fun...

Coronapod: An untapped resource
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the labs struggling to get involved in diagnostic testing, and should you be wearing a mask?In this episode:02:07 A drive to diagnoseMany research labs are pivoting from their normal work to offer diagnostic testing for COVID-19. We discuss how to go about retooling a lab, the hurdles researchers are facing and why, in some cases, tests are not being taken up.News: Thousands of coronavirus tests are going unused in US labs14:18 Masking the issue?There ha...

09 April 2020: A plastic-recycling enzyme, and supercooled molecules
This week, a new enzyme speeds up the breakdown of plastic bottles, and a method to cool molecules to a fraction above absolute zero.In this episode:01:18 A PET recycling enzymeResearchers have engineered an enzyme that effectively breaks down the plastic PET into its constituent monomers. This could allow for more complete recycling of bottles and clothes. Research Article: Tournier et al.06:41 Research HighlightsThe shocking lengths humans will go to to satisfy their curiosity, and the reasons for elevate...


Coronapod: Ramping up responses
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the latest on the British response, and what low- and middle-income countries have done to prepare for the pandemic.In this episode:01:33 Testing in the UKThis week, the UK health secretary announced plans to further ramp up testing for COVID-19, with the aim of preforming 100,000 tests a day in England by the end of April. We discuss these plans and why testing remains a key weapon in the fight against the virus.11:37 Pandemic preparation in poorer coun...

02 April 2020: Dating an ancient hominid skull, and an ancient Antarctic rainforest
This week, reassessing the age of the ‘Broken Hill skull’, and unearthing evidence of an ancient forest near the South Pole.In this episode:01:25 A skull’s place in historyAfter nearly a century scientists believe they’ve finally pinned down an age for the ‘Broken Hill skull’ hominid specimen. Research Article: Grun et al.07:44 Research HighlightsA simple way to detect early signs of cancer, and 3D printed soft brain implants. Research Highlight: A blood test finds deadly cancers before symptoms start; Rese...

Coronapod: Old treatments and new hopes
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss efforts to develop treatments for COVID-19.In this episode:02:00 A push for plasmaIn New York, hospitals are preparing to infuse patients with the antibody-rich blood plasma of people who have recovered from COVID-19. This approach has been used during disease outbreaks for over a century and we discuss how it works, and how effective is might be.We also talk about how drug trials for potential treatments are progressing, how scientists are pulling toget...


25 March 2020: Ultra-fast electrical switches, and computing heart health
This week, a speedy, yet simple switch, and a video-based AI helps assess heart health.In this episode:01:57 Speedy switchesResearchers have developed an ultra-fast electrical switch that they hope can be used in communication and imaging applications. Research Article: Nikoo et al.08:14 Research HighlightsUsing sound to estimate glacial retreat, and building a dodgier drone. Research Highlight: Underwater microphones listen as as glacier retreats; Research article: Falanga et al.10:32 Algorithmic heart dia...

Podcast Extra: Rosamund Pike on portraying Marie Curie
Radioactive is a new biopic on Marie Skłodowska Curie with Rosamund Pike taking on the role of Curie. This Podcast Extra is an extended version of reporter Lizzie Gibney's interview with Rosamund, in which they talk about stepping into the shoes of the scientific giant.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Coronapod: “Test, test, test!”
In the first of our new podcast series, Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the epidemiology needed to control the Covid-19 outbreak.In this episode:03:57 Testing timesCase numbers of Covid-19 have leapt around the world in recent days, but how many undetected cases are out there? We talk about the urgent need to deploy two of the cornerstones of effective epidemiology – testing and contact tracing – and discuss why these measures aren’t being rolled out worldwide.News article: Scientists ...


19 March 2020: Rosamund Pike in Radioactive, and the resurgence of Russian science
This week, we speak to Rosamund Pike about her experience portraying Marie Skłodowska Curie, and we find out how science in Russia is changing after years of decline.In this episode:01:43 RadioactiveBritish actor Rosamund Pike tells us about her new film, and her experience of portraying double Nobel-Laureate Marie Curie. Arts Review: Marie Curie biopic should have trusted pioneer’s passion10:17 Research HighlightsThe neural circuitry involved in stopping, and a jelly-like substance that cleans paintings. R...

Podcast Extra: Coronavirus - science in the pandemic
In this Podcast Extra, we hear from epidemiologists, genomicists and social scientists about how they're working to tackle the coronavirus and what they've learned so far.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Podcast Extra: Coronavirus - science in the pandemic
In this Podcast Extra, we hear from epidemiologists, genomicists and social scientists about how they're working to tackle the coronavirus and what they've learned so far.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Long Read Podcast: Are feelings more than skin deep?
Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that emotional expressions – smiling when happy, scowling when angry, and so on – were universal. This idea stood unchallenged for a generation.But a new cohort of psychologists and cognitive scientists are revisiting the data. Many researchers now think that the picture is a lot more complicated, and that facial expressions vary widely between contexts and cultures.This is an audio version of our feature: Why faces don’t always tell the truth about feelings, writte...

12 March 2020: An ancient bird trapped in amber, and life beneath the ocean floor
This week, a newly discovered bird species from the time of the dinosaurs, and microbes hundreds of metres below the ocean floor.In this episode:00:44 A tiny, toothy, ancient birdResearchers have found a perfectly preserved bird fossil trapped in amber, with some rather unusual features.The paper covered in this video has been retracted and the contents of this video are incorrect. New evidence suggests that the specimen might actually be a lizard, and not a bird-like dinosaur. Read more in this article. ht...

12 March 2020: An ancient bird trapped in amber, and life beneath the ocean floor
This week, a newly discovered bird species from the time of the dinosaurs, and microbes hundreds of metres below the ocean floor.In this episode:00:44 A tiny, toothy, ancient birdResearchers have found a perfectly preserved bird fossil trapped in amber, with some rather unusual features. Research Article: Xing et al.; News and Views: Tiny bird fossil might be the world’s smallest dinosaur08:09 Research HighlightsDental hygiene in the time of the Vikings, and wildebeest bones feed an African ecosystem. Resea...


05 March 2020: Ultrafast machine vision, and quicker crystal creation
This week, improving computers’ image identification, and a new method for growing crystals.00:44 Upgrading computer sightResearchers have designed a sensor that allows machines to assess images in nanoseconds. Research Article: Mennel et al.; News and Views: In-sensor computing for machine vision06:51 Research HighlightsCalorie restriction’s effects on rat cells, and the dwindling of sandy seashores. Research Highlight: Old age’s hallmarks are delayed in dieting rats; Research Highlight: Sandy beaches are ...

Backchat: Covering coronavirus
In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature's coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: Covering coronavirus
In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature's coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy...


27 February 2020: Mapping fruit flies’ neural circuitry, and perfecting the properties of metallic glass
This week, the brain pathways of egg laying in fruit flies, and preventing fractures in metallic glass.In this episode:00:46 Working out the wiring behind fruit fly behaviourResearchers have identified a neural circuit linking mating and egg laying in female fruit flies. Research Article: Wang et al.06:01 Research HighlightsAncient, cave-dwelling cockroaches, and hairy moths dampen sound. Research Highlight: Cockroaches preserved in amber are the world’s oldest cave dwellers; Research Highlight: Stealth fly...

Podcast Extra: ‘There is lots of anxiety’: a scientist’s view from South Korea
In recent days, the number of coronavirus cases have surged in South Korea.In this Podcast Extra Nick Howe speaks to Bartosz Gryzbowski, a researcher based in the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, which is just 60km away from epicentre of the South Korean outbreak. He explains how the outbreak has affected his research and what the atmosphere is like there at the moment.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

20 February 2020: Improving battery charging, and harnessing energy from the air
This week, machine learning helps batteries charge faster, and using bacterial nanowires to generate electricity from thin air.In this episode:00:46 Better battery chargingA machine learning algorithm reveals how to quickly charge batteries without damaging them. Research Article: Attia et al.07:12 Research HighlightsDeciphering mouse chit-chat, and strengthening soy glue. Research Highlight: The ‘silent’ language of mice is decoded at last; Research Article: Gu et al.09:21 Harnessing humidityA new device p...


13 February 2020: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet
This week, uncovering the structure of materials with useful properties, and quantum entanglement over long distances.In this episode:00:45 Analysing Prussian bluesAnalogues of the paint pigment Prussian blue are used in a variety of chemical processes. Now, researchers have uncovered their atomic structure. Research Article: Simonov et al.; News and Views: Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials08:17 Research HighlightsTeenagers’ natural sleep cycles impact on academic performance, and an e...

06 February 2020: Out-of-office emails and work-life-balance, and an update on the novel coronavirus outbreak
This week, how setting an out-of-office email could help promote a kinder academic culture.In this episode:00:47 Being truly out of officeLast year, a viral tweet about emails sparked a deeper conversation about academics’ work-life-balance. Could email etiquette help tip the balance? Careers Article: Out of office replies and what they can say about you09:35 Research HighlightsFinding the ‘greenest’ oranges, and the benefits of ‘baby talk’. Research Article: Bell and Horvath; Research Highlight: Babies ben...

30 January 2020: Linking Australian bushfires to climate change, and Asimov's robot ethics
This week, establishing the role of climate change in Australian bushfires, and revisiting Isaac Asimov’s ethical rules for robots.In this episode:00:46 Behind the bushfiresResearchers are working to establish the role that climate change is playing in the bushfires that are raging across Australia. News Feature: The race to decipher how climate change influenced Australia’s record fires; Editorial: Australia: show the world what climate action looks like10:02 Research HighlightsThe debate around how Vesuvi...


23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change
This week, why stress makes mice turn grey, and how to think about climate change.In this episode:00:45 Going greyAnecdotal evidence has long suggested stressas a cause of grey hair. Now, a team of researchers have showed experimental evidence to suggest this is the case. Research Article: Zhang et al.; News & Views: How the stress of fight or flight turns hair white08:39 Research HighlightsAncient bones suggest that giant ground sloths moved in herds,plus an atomic way to check for whiskey fakes. Research ...

16 January 2020: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity
In this episode: 00:45 Observing the centre of the galaxyResearchers have uncovered a population of dust-enshrouded objects orbiting the supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy.Research Article: Ciurlo et al. 06:34 Research HighlightsA London landmark’s height lends itself to a physics experiment, and generous behaviour in parrots. Research Highlight: An iconic structure in London moonlights as a scientific tool; Research Highlight: Parrots give each other gifts without promise of reward 09:00 T...

09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


01 January 2020: Our reporters’ top picks of 2019
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019.In this episode:00:33 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:56 The make up of the far side of the MoonInitial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; ...

Nature PastCast, December 1920: The Quantum Theory
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.In this episode, we’re heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. At its smallest scales was the world continuous? Or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920.This...

Podcast Extra: From climate lawyer to climate activist
2019 will likely go down as a pivotal year for public discourse on climate change. It was the year of Greta Thunberg, the climate school strikes, and Extinction Rebellion. The global activist movement has gained support from a range of influential people, including renowned environmental lawyer Farhana Yamin.In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally ...


Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics.Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes?In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the h...

19 December 2019: The three-body problem, and festive fun
We’ve launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to know what you think of the show to help us make a great podcast. You can find the survey here. Thanks!This week, a solution to a centuries-old physics problem, and holiday shenanigans.In this episode:00:51 Disentangling three bodiesResearchers have been working to unpick a problem that has stumped scientists since the 1600s. Research Article: Stone and Leigh08:50 Frosty the SnowmanThe first of our festive science songs, about how a certain snowman is farin...

Long Read Podcast: How to save coral reefs as the world warms
Research groups around the world are exploring new ways of protecting coral reefs from climate change.This is an audio version of our feature: These corals could survive climate change — and help save the world’s reefs, written by Amber Dance and read by Kerri Smith.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


12 December 2019: Social priming, and acoustic science
We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better, so please help us by filling in the survey, thanks!In this episode:00:45 What’s next for social priming?How might a branch of psychological research move forward in the face of replication failures? News Feature: What’s next for psychology’s embattled field of social priming08:55 Research HighlightsKiller-whale grandmothers help their grandchildren survive, and the failed voyage of a reprodu...

05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds
We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better. You can find the survey here. Thanks!In this episode: 00:45 The GenomeAsia 100k projectResearchers have released the first data from an ambitious project to sequence the genomes of 100,000 people from populations across Asia. Research Article: GenomeAsia100K Consortium 08:56 Research HighlightsBare riverbanks make meanders move, and human activity affects picky penguins. Research Highlight: ...

Nature Pastcast, November 1869: The first issue of Nature
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.In this episode, we’re heading back to 4 November 1869, when Nature’s story began. The first issue of the journal looked very different from the way it does now and, to the dismay of the editor, it was not immediately popular. In this podcast, we hear how Nature began, and how it became the journal it is today.From the archiveNat...


21 November 2019: A new antibiotic from nematode guts, grant funding ‘lotteries’, and butterfly genomes
This week, an antibiotic that targets hard-to-treat bacteria, and a roundup of the latest science news.In this episode:00:49 Discovering darobactinResearchers looked inside nematode guts and have identified a new antibiotic with some useful properties. Research Article: Imai et al.05:45 Research HighlightsUsing urine as a health metric, and sniffing out book decay with an electronic nose. Research Article: Miller et al.; Research Article: Veríssimo et al.07:54 News ChatAdding an element of chance to grant f...

14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium’s role in alcoholic hepatitis
This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease.00:46 A new dimension for 3D printersA new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.; News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go08:07 Research HighlightsThe slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous...


14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium’s role in alcoholic hepatitis
This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease.00:46 A new dimension for 3D printersA new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.; News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go08:07 Research HighlightsThe slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous...

Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary
This week marks 150 years since the first issue of Nature was published, on 4 November 1869. In this anniversary edition of Backchat, the panel take a look back at how the journal has evolved in this time, and discuss the role that Nature can play in today's society. The panel also pick a few of their favourite research papers that Nature has published, and think about where science might be headed in the next 150 years.Collection: 150 years of Nature  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat...

Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary
This week marks 150 years since the first issue of Nature was published, on 4 November 1869. In this anniversary edition of Backchat, the panel take a look back at how the journal has evolved in this time, and discuss the role that Nature can play in today's society. The panel also pick a few of their favourite research papers that Nature has published, and think about where science might be headed in the next 150 years.Collection: 150 years of Nature For information regarding your data privacy, visit acas...


07 November 2019: The fossil of an upright ape, science in 150 years, and immunization progress around the world
This week, insights into the evolution of walking upright, how science needs to change in the next 150 years, and the unfinished agenda for vaccines.In this episode:00:50 Early ape locomotionThe discovery of a fossil of a new species of ape gives new insights on how bipedalism may have evolved. Research Article: Böhme et al.; News and Views: Fossil ape hints at how walking on two feet evolved; News: Fossil ape offers clues to evolution of walking on two feet07:24 Research HighlightsWomen lacking olfactory b...

Nature Pastcast, October 1993: Carl Sagan uses Galileo to search for signs of life
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.In the early 1990s, a team of astrophysicists led by Carl Sagan looked at data from the Galileo spacecraft and saw the signatures of life on a planet in our galaxy. Historian of science David Kaiser and astrobiologists Charles Cockell and Frank Drake discuss how we can tell if there is life beyond the Earth – and how optimism, as...

31 October 2019: An AI masters the video game StarCraft II, and measuring arthropod abundance
This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods.In this episode:00:45 Learning to playBy studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft II.Research Article: Vinyals et al.; News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II10:08 Research HighlightsA record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter’s favourite tunesResearch Highlight: He...


31 October 2019: An AI masters the video game StarCraft II, and measuring arthropod abundance
This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods.In this episode:00:45 Learning to playBy studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft II.Research Article: Vinyals et al.; News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II10:08 Research HighlightsA record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter’s favourite tunesResearch Highlight: He...

Podcast Extra: Detecting gravitational waves
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, we look back at an important moment in the history of science.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals
This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.In this episode:00:43 A quantum computing milestoneA quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. Research Article: Arute et al.; News and Views: Quantum computing takes flight; Editorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computing; News: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim08:24 Research Highlights...


17 October 2019: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving ‘de novo’ genes
This week, investigating child mortality rates at a local level, and building genes from non-coding DNA.In this episode:00:43 A regional view of childhood mortalityResearchers map countries' progress towards the UN’s Sustainable Developmental Goals. Research Article: Burstein et al.; World View: Data on child deaths are a call for justice; Editorial: Protect the census07:22 Research HighlightsAstronomers identify a second visitor from beyond the solar system, and extreme snowfall stifles animal breeding in ...

10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning
This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI.In this episode:00:47 Which is the big quake?A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor. Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocks; News and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed07:46 Research HighlightsVampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses w...

Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin, in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner Didier Queloz
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to physicist Didier Queloz, who was announced today as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics. Shortly after the winners were announced, Didier took part in a press conference to talk about his award. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to chat with him.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

03 October 2019: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes
This week, how new species may form by sexual imprinting, and a previously unknown way for mosquitoes to migrate.In this episode:00:43 New species by sexual imprinting?A Central American frog chooses mates resembling its parents, a possible route for new species to form. Research Article: Yang et al.; News and Views: Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother’s influence09:58 Research HighlightsA light-based pacemaker, and the mathematics of the best place to park. Research Article: Mei et al.; Research Highl...

03 October 2019: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes
This week, how new species may form by sexual imprinting, and a previously unknown way for mosquitoes to migrate.In this episode:00:43 New species by sexual imprinting?A Central American frog chooses mates resembling its parents, a possible route for new species to form. Research Article: Yang et al.; News and Views: Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother’s influence09:58 Research HighlightsA light-based pacemaker, and the mathematics of the best place to park. Research Article: Mei et al.; Research Highl...


Nature PastCast, September 1963: Plate tectonics – the unifying theory of Earth sciences
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.Earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains; we understand all these phenomena in terms of plate tectonics (large-scale movements of the Earth’s crust). But when a German geologist first suggested that continents move, in the 1910s, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a ‘wild idea’ became the u...

26 September 2019: Mysteries of the ancient mantle, and the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
This week, diamond-containing rocks may help uncover secrets of the Earth’s mantle, and a reflection on science since the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published.In this episode:00:46 Earth’s EvolutionExplosive eruptions have allowed researchers to study Earth’s mysterious mantle. Research Article: Woodhead et al.; News and Views: Enigmatic origin of diamond-bearing rocks revealed06:08 Research HighlightsSupersonic cork popping, and the timing of vaccines. Research Highlight: An uncorked champagne bot...

Podcast Extra: Absurd scientific advice
How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems is the new book from XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe. In this Podcast Extra, Randall talks about the book, its inspiration and the bizarre thought experiments it contains.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Backchat: Covering Climate Now
In this episode:00:44 A global media collaborationThis week, Nature is taking part in the Covering Climate Now project. What is it, and why has Nature joined? Editorial: Act now and avert a climate crisis05:49 ‘Climate change’ vs ‘climate emergency’In early 2019, The Guardian changed the wording they use when covering climate stories. Our panel discusses the importance of phrasing, and how it evolves. The Guardian: Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment13:40 Choosing climate...

19 September 2019: XKCD, and Extinction Rebellion
This week, absurd advice from XKCD’s Randall Munroe, and a conversation with climate lawyer turned activist Farhana Yamin.In this episode: 00:46 How to do things (badly)Cartoonist Randall Munroe tell us about his new book: How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems.08:21 Research HighlightsHow insemination makes honeybee queens lose their way, and ‘toe maps’ in the brain. Research Highlight: Sex clouds queen bees’ vision; Research Highlight: ‘Toe maps’ in the brain guide painters born w...

12 September 2019: Modelling early embryos, and male-dominated conferences
This week, modelling embryonic development, and an analysis of male dominated conferences.In this episode:00:44 Imitating implantationResearchers have created a system that uses stem cells to model the early stages of pregnancy. Research article: Zheng et al.; News and Views: Human embryo implantation modelled in microfluidic channels08:03 Research HighlightsTraces of baby turtle tracks, and Titan’s explosive past. Research Highlight: A baby sea turtle’s ancient trek is captured in a fossil; Research Highli...


12 September 2019: Modelling early embryos, and male-dominated conferences
This week, modelling embryonic development, and an analysis of male dominated conferences.In this episode:00:44 Imitating implantationResearchers have created a system that uses stem cells to model the early stages of pregnancy. Research article: Zheng et al.; News and Views: Human embryo implantation modelled in microfluidic channels08:03 Research HighlightsTraces of baby turtle tracks, and Titan’s explosive past. Research Highlight: A baby sea turtle’s ancient trek is captured in a fossil; Research Highli...

05 September 2019: Persistent antibiotic resistance, and modelling hot cities
This week, Salmonella spreading antibiotic resistance, and the drivers of urban heat islands.In this episode: 00:46 Antibiotic resistance reservoirsResearchers have identified how Salmonella ‘persister’ cells can spread antibiotic resistance genes in mice intestines.Research article: Bakkeren et al.08:12 Research HighlightsBright barn owls stun prey, and the evolution of dog brains. Research Highlight: Zip-lining owls reveal what really scares their prey; Research Highlight: A dog’s breed is a window onto i...

Nature PastCast, August 1975: Antibodies’ ascendency to blockbuster drug status
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.They’re found in home-testing kits for pregnancy, hospital tests for MRSA, and in six out of ten of the best-selling drugs today. But monoclonal antibodies have kept a surprisingly low profile since their debut in a Nature paper in 1975. This podcast follows them from that time through patent wars, promising drug trials and final...


29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains.In this episode: 00:45 A nanotube microprocessorScientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes.Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up 08:38 Research HighlightsWeighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic.Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron;...

22 August 2019: Combating online hate speech, and identifying early fossils
This week, the resilience of internet hate groups, and searching for early life.In this episode:00:46 Tackling internet hateResearchers have been modelling how hate groups interact online, and have come up with suggestions to combat this activity. Research article: Johnson et al.; News and Views: Strategies for combating online hate08:55 Research HighlightsGallstone growth, and the reproductive strategies of hitchhiking stick insects. Research Highlight: The ‘net’ that leads to excruciating stones in the be...

15 August 2019: Atomic espionage in the Second World War, and exploring the early Universe
This week, spilling nuclear secrets, and a mysterious period in the Universe’s history.In this episode:00:46 "The most dangerous spy in history"We hear the story of Klaus Fuchs, who gave away the details of building an atomic bomb. Books and Arts: The scientist-spy who spilt secrets of the bomb08:00 Research HighlightsEnvironmental impacts of electric scooters, and the Goliath frog engineers. Research Highlight: Trendy e-scooters might not be as green as they seem; Research Highlight: Enormous frogs heave r...


08 August 2019: A mindset for success, and mercury in fish
This week, a mindset to improve school performance, and the complex story of how mercury accumulates in fish.In this episode:00:46 Growth MindsetHow a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Research article: Yeager et al.11:47 Research HighlightsAn extinct giant parrot, and hacking Manhattan’s traffic. Research Highlight: Polly wants many crackers: fossils reveal first known giant parrot; Research Article: Vivek et al.13:42 Toxic TunaMethylmercury levels in fish may increase due to climate chan...

01 August 2019: The placental microbiome, and advances in artificial intelligence
This week, whether the placenta is lacking microbes, and new hardware for artificial intelligence.In this episode:00:43 Microbe-free placentas?New research suggests that the placenta is sterile. Research article: de Goffau et al.; News and Views: No bacteria found in healthy placentas07:12 Research HighlightsAntacids and allergies, and the source of unexplained radioactivity. Research Article: Jordakieva et al.; Research Article: Masson et al.09:13 AI hardwareMaking technology for AI can be challenging, so ...

Nature PastCast, July 1942: Secret science in World War 2
This episode was first broadcast in July 2013.This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.During the Second World War, scientists worked on secret projects such as the development of radar. Their efforts were hinted at in the pages of Nature but the details, of course, couldn't be published. In this episode, historian Jon Agar explains how war work gave physicists a new ou...


25 July 2019: The history of climate change, and making vaccines mandatory
This week, how the climate has changed throughout history, and why enforcing vaccination should be done with care.In this episode:00:39 Climate through timeResearchers have modelled how climate has changed throughout the past 2000 years. Research article: Neukom et al.; Research article:Neukom et al.; News and Views: The aberrant global synchrony of present-day warming06:45 Research HighlightsMaking a self-propelling liquid, and the benefit of laugh tracks. Research Highlight: How to make water flow uphill;...

Backchat July 2019: Breaking news, audience-led journalism and human gene editing
In this episode:01:01 Breaking NewsThe first image of a black hole took the world by storm, but what was it like reporting such a quickly developing story? News: Black hole pictured for first time — in spectacular detail; Video: The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide; Video: How scientists reacted to the first-ever image of a black hole09:01 Digital JournalismWhen a new research paper came to light about pig brains being revived, we asked our audience what they wanted to know, and got a big r...

18 July 2019: Quantum logic gates in silicon, and moving on from lab disasters
This week, a new advance in silicon based quantum computing and experiences of how to recover when disaster strikes.In this episode:00:45 Quantum logicA fast and accurate two-qubit logic gate has been designed in silicon. Research article: Simmons et al.07:52 Research HighlightsTeaching a computer to solve a Rubik’s cube and immigration in Chichén Itzá. Research Highlight: AI solves the Rubik’s cube; Research Highlight: Death as a human sacrifice awaited some travellers to a Mayan city10:43 Coping with cala...


11 July 2019: The moon, past, present, and future
This week, an extended chat about all things lunar with Alex Witze.Instead of a regular edition of the Nature Podcast, this week we’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of humans walking on the Moon. Nick Howe catches up with planetary science reporter, Alex Witze. They discuss the latest US plans to land people on the moon by 2024, the history of the Apollo missions, and what’s next for the lunar exploration.News: Can NASA really return people to the Moon by 2024?Books and Arts: Propulsive reading: books on...

04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand’s sustainability
This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining.In this episode:00:47 Predicting propertiesA word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials. Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery08:28 Research HighlightsTiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots. Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research...

Nature PastCast, June 1876: Gorillas, man-eating monsters?
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.According to the fables of early explorers, the gorilla was a terrible, man-eating monster. It was also thought to be man’s closest relative in the animal kingdom. Naturally, scientists and the public alike wanted to see these fierce beasts for themselves. But in the mid-nineteenth century, as the evolution debate heated up, gett...


27 June 2019: Callused feet, and protein-based archaeology
This week, how going barefoot affects what your feet can feel, and uncovering history with ancient proteins.In this episode:00:44 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:50 Research HighlightsMagma moving quickly, and twice-transforming 4D materials. Research Highlight: Volcano’s magma hit top speed; Research Article: Wang et al.11:09 Dating fossils with protei...

20 June 2019: Non-native species, and a blood-inspired robot battery
This week, what makes birds invasive, and a robotic fish powered by a blood-like battery.In this episode:00:44 How do alien bird species establish themselves?Researchers have been looking at how bird species settle in non-native locations. Research article: Redding et al.08:22 Research HighlightsCrafting the perfect crêpe, and anti-fungal wasp eggs. Research Highlight: Physicists tackle a delicate challenge: making the ideal crêpe; Research article: Strohm et al.10:09 Robot bloodMultipurpose battery fluid b...

13 June 2019: Mighty magnets, and aerosols in the atmosphere
This week, a record-breaking magnetic field, and aerosols’ potential effects on the atmosphere.In this episode:00:45 Making massive magnetsResearchers have created the world’s strongest direct current magnetic field. Research article: S. Hahn et al.08:38 Research HighlightsMacaques’ musicality and human consumption of microplastics. Research Article: Divergence in the functional organization of human and macaque auditory cortex revealed by fMRI responses to harmonic tones; Research Highlight: What a bottled...


06 June 2019: Microbes modifying medicine and kickstarting plate tectonics
This week, how gut microbes might be affecting drugs, and a new theory on the beginning of plate tectonics.In this episode:00:45 Microbes metabolising drugsResearchers are investigating whether the gut microbiota can alter the activity of medicinal drugs.Research article: Zimmermann et al. 06:40 Research HighlightsElephants counting with smell, and audio activity monitoring.Research Highlight: Elephants have a nose for portion sizeResearch Highlight: Deep learning monitors human activity based on sound alon...

Nature PastCast May 1983: Discovering the ozone layer hole
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.The discovery of the ozone hole in the mid-1980s was a shock. Scientists suspected that man-made gases called CFCs were damaging the ozone layer, but they didn’t expect to see such a dramatic decline. Nor did they expect the discovery to be made by a small group of British scientists in Antarctica. In this podcast, we hear from t...



Nature PastCast April 1953: The other DNA papers
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.Over 60 years ago, James Watson and Francis Crick published their famous paper proposing a structure for DNA. Everyone knows that story – but fewer people know that there were actually three papers about DNA in that issue of Nature. In this podcast, first broadcast in April 2013, we uncover the evidence that brought Watson and C...


18 April 2019: Reviving brains, lightning, and spring books
This week, restoring function in dead pig brains, spring science books, and the structure of lightning.If you have any questions about the partly-revived brains study, then the reporters at Nature are keen to answer them. You can submit them at the bottom of the article, here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01216-4   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Podcast Extra: The first image of a black hole
This week, researchers released the first image of a black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. In this special News Chat, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi, who was at a press conference in Brussels where the image was announced, tells Benjamin Thompson about the image and what scientists are saying about it.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....



Nature Pastcast March 1918: The eclipse expedition to put Einstein to the test
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our Pastcast series, bringing to life key moments in the history of science.As the First World War draws to an end, astronomer Arthur Eddington sets out on a challenging mission: to prove Einstein’s new theory of general relativity by measuring a total eclipse. The experiment became a defining example of how science should be done.This episode was first broadcast in March 2014.  See acast.com/privac...

14 March 2019: Ebola in DRC, a new HIV treatment, and the proposed US budget.
Instead of a regular edition of the Nature Podcast, this week we’ve got an extended News Chat between Benjamin Thompson and Amy Maxmen. They discuss the ongoing Ebola outbreak in DRC, an injectable treatment for HIV, and how the proposed US 2020 budget could affect science.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....




Podcast Extra: The search for a rare disease treatment
Nick Sireau’s sons have a rare genetic disease called alkaptonuria, which can lead to body tissues becoming brittle, causing life long health issues.In this Podcast Extra, Geoff Marsh speaks to Nick and to the physician Dr Lakshminarayan Ranganath about their search for a treatment for alkaptonuria.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


26 December 2018: Our reporters' top picks of 2018
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, a few of our regular reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2018, and explain why they enjoyed making it.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

















22 February 2018: A focus on adolescence
This week, a teenage special: defining adolescence; high school researchers; and the science of teen risk taking.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....







12 October 2017: A dwarf planet & DNA sequencing
This week, a dwarf planet with a ring, 40 years of Sanger DNA sequencing, and the grieving families contributing to a huge genetics projects.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: 500th show compilation
To celebrate our 500th episode, the Nature Podcast asked 8 presenters – past and present – to recommend their favourite contributions to the show.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 5 October 2017
This week, floating cities, malaria-free mosquitos, and using evolution to inspire aircraft design.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 21 September 2017
This week, Sherlock Holmes the scientist; and investigating the nanotubes between cells.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 14 September 2017
This week, writing quantum software, and predicting the loss of Asia's glaciers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 7 September 2017
Protecting red haired people from cancer, machine learning and gravitational distortions, and peeking inside predatory journals.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 24 August 2017
The creeping danger of slow landslides, and what worms can teach us about the wriggly problem of reproducibility.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 17 August 2017
This week, preventing genetic diseases in China, a red supergiant star's mystery, and the algal boom.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 10 August 2017
This week, ancient mammal relatives, complex brain maps, and a 19th century solar eclipse.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 3 August 2017
This week, the first flower, gene editing human embryos, and the antimatter quest.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 27 July 2017
This week, a brain-inspired computer, the brain's control of ageing, and Al Gore the climate communicator.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 20 July 2017
This week, getting a handle on topology, and working out why the fastest animals are medium sized.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 13 July 2017
This week, defying quantum noise, looking at early signs of autism, and taking steps to assess exercise.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 6 July 2017
This week, a new kind of quantum bit, the single-cell revolution, and exploring Antarctica’s past to understand sea level rise.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Grand Challenges: Energy
To combat global warming, the world needs to change where it gets its energy from. Three energy experts discuss the challenges of transitioning to low carbon energy, and what advances are needed to make the journey possible. This is the final episode in the Grand Challenges podcast series.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Extra: The grey zone
Sometimes people can become trapped in the grey zone between conscious and unconscious states. Kerri Smith talks to neuroscientist Adrian Owen about communicating with patients in vegetative states.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: June 2017
Our reporters and editors respond to the UK election. Plus, the tangled taxonomy of our species, and why physicists love to hate the standard model.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 15 June 2017
This week, treating infection without antibiotics, wireless charging, and making sense of music.     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 15 June 2017
This week, treating infection without antibiotics, wireless charging, and making sense of music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 8 June 2017
This week, early Homo sapiens in Morocco, mathematicians trying to stop gerrymandering, and going beyond the standard model.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Grand Challenges: Food security
Millions around the world are chronically hungry. Three experts on agriculture discuss how to help people grow enough food, in a world of evolving technology, global markets and a changing climate. This is episode 3 of 4 in the Grand Challenges podcast series.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 1 June 2017
This week, ‘sticky’ RNA causes disease, disorganised taxonomy, and 'intelligent crowd' peer review.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures May 2017
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from May, 'Life, hacked' by Krystal Claxton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Backchat: May 2017
This month the team are chatting scientific data, scientific papers and... religion.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 25 May 2017
This week, E. coli with colour vision, tracing the Zika virus outbreak, and a roadmap for medical microbots.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 18 May 2017
This week, wonky vehicle emissions tests, error-prone bots help humans, and animals that lack a microbiome.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 11 May 2017
This week, fake antibodies scupper research, the diversity of cells in a tumour, and what happened before tectonic plates? SURVEY: https://podcastsurvey.typeform.com/to/RmZVDI  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 4 May 2017
This week, the secret life of the thalamus, how to talks about antibiotic resistance, and dangerous research. Survey link: https://podcastsurvey.typeform.com/to/RmZVDI  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Grand Challenges: Ageing
Ageing is inevitable, but that doesn't mean we're ready for it - as individuals, or as a society. A geneticist, a psychiatrist and an economist pick apart our knowledge of the ageing process and the major challenges to be solved so we can live healthily and well.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures April 2017
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from March, 'Cold comforts' by Graham Robert Scott.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 27 April 2017
This week, the earliest Americans, 2D magnets, and the legacy of the Universe’s first ‘baby picture’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: April 2017
Science fans everywhere will take to the streets this weekend in the March for Science. Plus, biases in artificial intelligence and how scientific papers are getting harder to read.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 13 April 2017
This week, politician scientists, human genetic ‘knockouts’ and East Antarctica’s instability.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 6 April 2017
This week, easing the pressure on fisheries, protein structure surprises, and your reading list for 2017 so far.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Grand Challenges: Mental Health
Mental health disorders touch rich and poor, young and old, in every country around the world. Hear three experts discuss the evidence for interventions, how to get help to the right people, and which problem, if solved, would help the most.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures March 2017
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from March, 'Green boughs will cover thee' by Sarah L Byrne.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 30 March 2017
This week, mapping sound in the brain, dwindling groundwater, and giving common iron uncommon properties.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: March 2017
A sting operation finds several predatory journals offered to employ a fictional, unqualified academic as an editor. Plus, the Great Barrier Reef in hot water, and trying to explain 'time crystals'.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 23 March 2017
This week, peering into a black hole, reorganising the dinosaur family tree and finding drug combos for cancer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 16 March 2017
This week, making plane fuel greener, yeast chromosomes synthesised from scratch, and seeking out hidden HIV.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - March 1918
As the First World War draws to an end, astronomer Arthur Eddington sets out on a challenging mission: to prove Einstein’s new theory of general relativity by measuring a total eclipse. The experiment became a defining example of how science should be done.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 9 March 2017
This week, the earliest known life, Neanderthal self-medication, and data storage in a single atom.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 2 March 2017
This week, a migration special: a researcher seeks refuge; smart borders; and climate migration.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: February 2017
AI generated images, reporting with reluctant sources and space missions with out an end game.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures February 2017
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell and Richard Hodson read you their favourite from February, 'Fermi's zookeepers' by David Gullen.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 23 February 2017
This week, highlights from AAAS, the new epigenetics, and a new way to conduct biomedical research  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 16 February 2017
This week, Winston Churchill’s thoughts on alien life, how cells build walls, and paradoxical materials.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - February 1925
Paleontologist Raymond Dart had newly arrived in South Africa when he came across a fossil that would change his life and his science. It was the face, jaw and brain cast of an extinct primate – not quite ape and not quite human. The paleontology community shunned the find, and proving that the creature was a human relative took decades. [Originally aired 26/02/2014]  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 9 February 2017
This week, free-floating DNA in cancers, an ancient relative of molluscs and can the Arctic’s ice be regrown?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 2 February 2017
Bird beaks show how evolution shifts gear, getting to Proxima b, and have physicists made metallic hydrogen?    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures January 2017
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you their favourite from January, 'The last robot' by S. L. Huang.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Backchat: January 2017
Moonshots, frameworks, catapults – how best to name your science project? Plus, the implications for science of Trump’s first days in office, and the perils of trying to reproduce others’ work.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 26 January 2017
This week, outer space law, predictive policing and enhancing the wisdom of the crowds.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 19 January 2017
This week, communication between viruses, reproducing cancer studies, and explaining ‘fairy circles’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - January 1896
Physics in the late nineteenth century was increasingly concerned with things that couldn't be seen. From these invisible realms shot x-rays, discovered by accident by the German scientist William Röntgen.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 12 January 2017
This week, ridding New Zealand of rats, making choices in the grocery store, and what to expect in 2017.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 22 December 2016
It’s our bumper end-of-year show, with a 2016 round-up, holiday reading picks, science carols, word games and more.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 15 December 2016
This week, a spray that boosts plant growth and resilience, 3-million-year old hominin footprints, and the seahorse genome.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - December 1920
In the early twentieth century physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. Originally aired 19/12/2013.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 8 December 2016
This week, the benefits of randomness, correcting brain waves soothes Alzheimer’s, and the DNA of liberated slaves.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures November 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Adam Levy reads you his favourite from November, ’Melissa' by Troy Stieglitz.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 1 December 2016
This week, CRISPR’s rival stumbles, Pluto’s icy heart, and is mitochondrial replacement ready for the clinic?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 24 November 2016
Tracking whale shark DNA in seawater, the human computers behind early astronomy, building materials with a microscope, and a new synchrotron starts up in the Middle East.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Backchat: November 2016
Donald Trump’s impact on research and climate action, and how Nature should discuss politics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 17 November 2016
This week, your brain on cannabis, testing CRISPR in a human, and what it might be like to live on Mars.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - November 1869
The first issue of Nature looked very different from today's magazine. It opened with poetry and was written for a general audience. We hear how Nature began, and how it became the iconic science journal it is today.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 10 November 2016
This week, CERN for the brain, modelling the effects of a climate tax on food, a brain-spine interface helps paralysed monkeys walk, and what Trump's win might mean for science.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 3 November 2016
This week, the earliest humans to roam Australia, Werner Herzog’s new film about volcanoes, and are astronomers turning a blind eye to competing theories?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures October 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from October, ’The sixth circle' by J. W. Armstrong.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 27 October 2016
This week, the challenges facing young scientists, pseudo-pseudo genes, and the history of HIV in the US.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Backchat: October 2016
Europe’s Mars probe loses touch, UK government proposes research funding shake-up, and science’s most bothersome buzzwords.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 20 October 2016
This week, making egg cells in a dish, super-bright flares in nearby galaxies, trying to predict the election, and the scientists voting for Trump.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - October 1993
In the early 1990s, a team of astrophysicists saw signs of life on a planet in our galaxy. Astronomy experts tell the story, and discuss how we can tell if there is life beyond the Earth. Originally aired 16/10/2013.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 13 October 2016
This week, refugee mental health, better neural nets, and changing attitudes to female genital cutting.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Nobel News
Science gets glitzy in October each year as the Nobel Prizes are awarded. Find out who took home the prizes for Medicine or Physiology, Physics and Chemistry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 6 October 2016
This week, a limit to lifespan, AI's black box problem, and ageing stem cells.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Backchat: September 2016
The challenges of getting into science, getting a decent salary once you’re in, and getting funding through philanthropy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 29 September 2016
This week, the chemistry of life’s origins, two million years of temperatures, and studying the heaviest elements.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures September 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Miranda Keeling reads you our favourite from September, ’Try Catch Throw’ by Andrew Neil Gray.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 22 September 2016
This week, a sea of viruses, defining social class, the human journey out of Africa and human remains found on Antikythera shipwreck.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - September 1963
When a German geologist first suggested that continents move, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a 'wild idea' became plate tectonics, the unifying theory of earth sciences.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 15 September 2016
This week, the ideal office environment, synthesising speech, and embryo epigenetics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 8 September 2016
This week, solving ethical dilemmas Star Trek style, farming festivals boost yield, and three scientists on their sci-fi inspirations.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 1 September 2016
This week, famous hominin Lucy may have died when she fell from a tree, and an antibody-based drug shows promise in Alzheimer’s  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Futures: August 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Kerri Smith reads you her favourite from August, 'Interdimensional trade benefits' by Brian Trent.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Backchat: August 2016
A nearby Earth-like planet, preprint servers proliferate, and the scientific legacy that Obama leaves behind.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 25 August 2016
This week, an Earth-like planet on our doorstep, dietary restriction combats ageing syndrome, and drugs for neglected diseases.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - August 1975
Six out of ten of the world's best-selling drugs are based on molecules called monoclonal antibodies. But their high impact comes with a low profile. This is a story of how basic science quietly became blockbuster medicine. Originally aired 14/08/13.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 18 August 2016
This week, how fins became limbs, a giant gene database cracks clinical cases, and making better opioids.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 11 August 2016
This week, the migration route of the first Americans, the bandwidth crisis, clever conductors, and the next CRISPR.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 4 August 2016
This week, parenting tips from science, quenching a question about thirst, and a programmable quantum computer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - July 1942
Scientists were put to good use during the Second World War. John Westcott's secret project was to design radars. His work not only helped the war effort – it also led to new branches of science. Originally aired 19/07/2013.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures July 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Adam Levy reads you his favourite from July, 'Revision theory' by Blaize M. Kaye.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 28 July 2016
This week, how we time our breathing, working with indigenous peoples, and using yeast genetics to build better beer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Backchat: July 2016
What’s it like having an endless supply of Brexit stories? Why do space missions always get so much attention? And why are rhinos being airlifted to Australia?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 21 July 2016
This week, the perils of tech in health, tumour fighting bacteria, and the science of what sounds good.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 14 July 2016
This week, a special issue on conflict. The psychological toll of war, how to count the dead, and predicting conflict in the 21st century.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 7 July 2016
This week, nature and landscape, the Hitomi satellite’s swan song, and reforming peer review.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures June 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. The Nature Podcast team read you their favourite from June, ‘The Memory Ward’ by Wendy Nikel.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 30 June 2016
This week, Dolly the sheep’s legacy, the trials of funding interdisciplinary research, and an ‘IPCC’ for social science.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 23 June 2016
This week, transmissible cancer, organising the hadron menagerie, and the latest gravitational wave result and what physicists want to know next.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Backchat: June 2016
What could Brexit mean for EU research and researchers? How should reporters cover the US elections when nobody says anything about science? Plus a dramatic and dangerous Antarctic rescue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 16 June 2016
This week, pimping proteins, adapting enzymes, and conserving coral reefs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - June 1876
In the late 1800s, Europe was gripped by 'gorilla fever'. Were these beasts man's closest relative in the animal kingdom? Getting a gorilla to Europe was a rare event, and in 1876 Nature heralds the arrival of a young specimen.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 9 June 2016
This week, researcher rehab, the hobbit’s ancestry, and Google’s quantum plans.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 2 June 2016
This week, the genetics behind a textbook case of evolution, Earth’s core conundrum, and Pluto’s polygonal surface.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures May 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from May, ‘Project Earth is leaving beta’ by J. W. Alden.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 26 May 2016
This week, how clouds form, a Neanderthal construction project, and comparing the meerkats.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 19 May 2016
This week, treasures from sunken cities, new antibiotics made from scratch, and experimenting with history.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat May 2016
The endless quest to make fusion energy, virtual reality in the lab, and the biggest story of the month: a boat gets given a name.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 12 May 2016
This week, the Zika virus and birth defects, colliding quasi-particles, and combatting sprawling networks of spam.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - May 1985
Jonathan Shanklin was sifting through a backlog of data when he made the startling discovery of a hole in the ozone layer above Antarctica. In this podcast, he and others recall events in the mid-1980s and discuss how the 'ozone hole' became the poster child for environmentalism. Originally aired 17/05/2013.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures April 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Adam Levy and Shamini Bundell read you their favourite from April, ‘Choices, in sequential order’ by Karlo Yeager Rodríguez.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 5 May 2016
This week, the value of failed experiments, ketamine without side effects, and our brains’ energy demands.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 28 April 2016
This week, a language map of the brain, listening for landslides a year after the Nepal quake, and the Soviet internet that never was.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat April 2016
The fuss over editing human embryos dies down, the quantum expertise of Canada’s Prime Minister, and what it’s like to report for 24 hours straight.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 21 April 2016
This week, the psychology of climate change, the 1.5 degree temperature target, and what to do when climate change ruins your research.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 14 April 2016
This week, a computer game helps build a quantum computer, the brain’s built-in backup, and the history and science of hearing voices.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - April 1953
Everyone knows that Watson and Crick published a seminal paper on the structure of DNA. But fewer know that two other papers on DNA were published in the same issue of Nature. Learn more in the first of a new podcast series: the Nature PastCast. Originally aired 18/04/2013.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 7 April 2016
This week, apps that claim to treat mental health issues, ritual human sacrifice, and supernova debris on Earth.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures March 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from March, 'Adjenia’ by Natalia Theodoridou.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 31 March 2016
This week, Antarctic-sized uncertainty, making gamers more polite, and a pocket gravity meter.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 24 March 2016
This week, toggling brain activity with radio waves, how to build stuff that lasts, and making thrillseekers into care-takers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat March 2016
Misused statistics, the latest gossip on Google’s Go-playing AI, and watching mathematicians win prizes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 17 March 2016
This week, retrieving lost memories, nailing down China’s emissions, and is Alzheimer’s disease transmissible?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 10 March 2016
This week, the frontiers of CRISPR, chewing raw goat for science, and using the eye’s own stem cells to fix it.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures February 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from February, ‘Duck, duck, duck' by Samantha Murray.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 3 March 2016
This week, more fast radio bursts spotted, how do you know where you are when you’re not moving, and listening in on a whale banquet.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Backchat February 2016
A month of manipulation, as we look at a re-run of a famously manipulative psychology study, learn how to manipulate our own brains and minds, and nudge our societies towards better collective action.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 25 February 2016
This week, a special episode about the future. How can we future-proof our world, or fight our natural bias against planning for the future? And what does the science of today mean for the health of tomorrow?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 18 February 2016
This week, making shipping greener, AAAS conference highlights and human genes in a Neanderthal.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Gravitational waves
Einstein's prediction was right: gravitational waves do exist. Scientists at the LIGO collaboration reported their discovery yesterday in Washington, DC. Reporters Adam Levy and Alexandra Witze take stock.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 11 February 2016
This week, the end of Moore’s law, religion and cooperation, and shareholders’ duty to manage climate risks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 4 February 2016
This week, killing off old cells lengthens life, brain-tickling comedy, and new forests make good carbon sinks.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures January 2016
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads ‘Beyond 550 astronomical units' by Mike Brotherton.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat January 2016
The putative Planet X, gravitational wave rumours and how to report them, and The Selfish Gene 40 years on.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 28 January 2016
This week, the computer that can play Go, a general ‘ageing’ factor, and the stolen library of John Dee.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 21 January 2016
This week, a brain sensor that melts away after use, a 10,000 year old murder mystery, and what happens when chickens go wild.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 14 January 2016
This week, our gut bugs’ love of fibre, squeezing quantum states, and studying boredom.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 7 January 2016
This week, science predictions for 2016, the effect of extreme weather on crops, and a new phase of hydrogen for the new year.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Podcast Extra – The Psychology of Star Wars
What can the world of Star Wars tell us about psychology? Travis Langley explains all in this Podcast Extra, using examples from his new book ‘Star Wars Psychology: Dark Side of the Mind’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 17 December 2015
This week, in our final show of 2015 – we’re wrapping up the highlights of the year, catching up on the climate meeting in Paris, looking forward to psyching out the characters in Star Wars, busting some scientific myths, and playing an evolution-themed board game.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 10 December 2015
This week, the dwarf planet Ceres gets a close-up, using fetal tissue in science, and the wasting condition that worsens outcomes for cancer patients.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 3 December 2015
This week, the origins of mysterious radio bursts, fixing the PhD system, and tracking down the universe’s missing matter.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures November 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Kerri Smith reads you her favourite from November, 'One slow step for man' by S R Algernon.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat November 2015
Einstein’s theory of general relativity turns 100 years old. Will there ever be another theory like it, or another scientist like Einstein? Plus, we discuss International Years as news pegs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 26 November 2015
This week, super-high-res ultrasound, the amazing world of soils, and five classic books about sustainability.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 19 November 2015
This week, a nursery for big baby planets, meddling with taste perception, China’s mega water transfer plan, and the 100th anniversary of general relativity.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 12 November 2015
This week, storms on Twitter over sexism in science, porous liquids, and the long relationship between humans and bees.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures October 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from October, 'Staff meeting, as seen by the spam filter' by Alex Shvartsman.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 5 November 2015
This week, spontaneously jumping droplets, growing an economy without trashing the environment, and dealing with an onslaught of data as all our gadgets become internet-enabled.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 29 October 2015
This week, how cancers spread, the hallmarks of bipolar disorder in the brain, and making carbon dioxide useful.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Backchat October 2015
Astronomer quits over sexual harassment investigation, reporting on the abstract world of mathematics, and science in fashion.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 22 October 2015
This week, a dying solar system just like ours, the effect of temperature on the economy, and electricity-eating bacteria.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 15 October 2015
This week, ancient human teeth found in China, cooperating in climate negotiations, and a humble worm surprises scientists.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures September 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell and Geoff Marsh read you their favourite from September, Time Flies, by Carie Juettner.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 8 October 2015
This week, an impenetrable mathematical proof, toggling REM sleep on and off, and the latest results from the Rosetta mission.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 1 October 2015
This week, the future of digital currency; a new lead for antibiotics; and 25 years of cataloguing the human genome.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 24 September 2015
This week, looking back at malaria interventions, using private data for research, and how to twist a travelling neutron.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat September 2015
Promising results from the LHC, reproducing psychology studies, and unpicking interdisciplinarity.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 17 September 2015
This week, camouflaging nanoparticles to deliver drugs, science meets theatre, and getting a global picture of air pollution.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra - Neurotribes
Steve Silberman's new book, Neurotribes, gives a detailed history of autism spectrum disorder. In this Podcast Extra, Geoff Marsh hears from Steve about how we, as a society, should embrace those who think differently.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 10 September 2015
This week, thinking differently about autism, plankton poop in the clouds, and hack-proofing our data.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures August 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from August, The Shoulder of Orion, by Eric Garside  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 3 September 2015
This week, weather forecasting, rethinking the water cycle, and a special segment to celebrate the podcast’s 400th episode.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Podcast Extra: The Invention of Science
In his new book, historian David Wootton takes us back to the scientific revolution around the turn of the 17th Century, and asks: was this really when modern science was born?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 27 August 2015
This week, a new look at the scientific revolution, accelerating positrons on a plasma wave, and squashing the unsquashable.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Backchat August 2015
Japan’s nuclear restart, summer quiet descends in the newsroom, and our special guest Geoff Brumfiel compares science reporting at Nature and NPR.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 20 August 2015
This week, China’s emissions are lower than we thought, lessons from Hurricane Katrina 10 years on, and inheriting genes… sideways.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 13 August 2015
This week, making chemists’ lives easier, updating a centuries-old sunspot record, and anti-GM activists get their hands on scientists’ inboxes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 6 August 2015
This week, lessons to learn from the Ebola epidemic, the reproductive habits of ancient organisms, and how the nuclear bomb changed the stories we tell about scientists.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 30 July 2015
This week, the ancient art of kirigami – paper cutting – applied to graphene. Plus, mini organs in dishes, and how mitochondria power our muscles.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures July 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from July, Outpatient, by Dan Stout  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Backchat July 2015
Pluto in pictures, ways to revamp science teaching, NASA’s underwater space-training mission, and listening for aliens.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 23 July 2015
This week, eyedrops could replace surgery for cataracts, the twists and turns of RNA, and a strain of rice that could feed more people and ease climate change.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 16 July 2015
This week, organic molecules in space, treating traumatic brain injury, and training schoolchildren to think like scientists.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Podcast Extra - A Beautiful Question
Is our universe beautiful? Do the fundamental laws that describe nature appeal to our aesthetic tastes? In this Podcast Extra, Frank Wilczek – theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate - discusses his latest book, which tackles this beautiful question.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 9 July 2015
This week, the geologists on quake alert, stopping HIV in its tracks, and a volcano that wreaked havoc on the climate 1500 years ago.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 2 July 2015
This week, lizards change sex in the heat, a complex eye in a single celled creature, and teaching robots to be ethical  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Futures June 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Geoff Marsh reads you his favourite from June, Heart worm, by J. J. Roth  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 24 June 2015
This week, Antarctica’s surprising biodiversity, trends in heatwaves and coldsnaps, and a new way to diagnose cancer early  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat June 2015
Three of Nature’s biggest paleontology fans sink their teeth into Jurassic World, which premiered this month. The team also discuss the importance of ‘dinomenclature’: why species names matter and how they are devised. Plus, DNA from an ancient human found in Washington State in the 1990s throws up questions of heritage.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 18 June 2015
This week, positive memories help fight depression, plant intelligence and measuring the mass of exoplanets  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 11 June 2015
This week, the US military’s biology arm, a clutch of Bronze Age genomes, and protection from a deadly disease in a community in Papua New Guinea  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 4 June 2015
This week, how the immune system deals with the brain, the latest in gene editing, and the mystery of Greenland’s disappearing lakes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Extra: Backchat May 2015
Robots that can recover from injury by themselves, naughty scientists faking or baking their data, and the weirdest places to look for much-needed new antibiotics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures May 2015
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Geoff Marsh reads you his favourite story from May, Tempus omnia revelat, by Tian Li.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 28 May 2015
This week, the ethics of killer robots, laser weapons become a reality, and the subtleties of temperature.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Audiofile: In search of lost sound
Are the sounds of the past lost forever? In the 1960s, an American engineer proposed that sound could be recorded into clay pots and paintings as they were created. This episode explores the science behind resurrecting the sounds of the past.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 21 May 2015
The oldest stone tools yet found, making opiates from yeast and sugar, and the perks of sex… for beetles.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 14 May 2015
This week, the latest result from the Large Hadron Collider, a memoir from neurologist and adventurer Oliver Sacks, and India’s scientific landscape.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 7 May 2015
This week, brain-inspired computers, scientists soldiering on past retirement age, and the origins of complex cells deduced from deep-sea samples.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Kerri Smith reads you her favourite from April, Bread of life, by Beth Cato.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 30 April 2015
This week, a tiny bat-like dinosaur, a competitor for graphene, and the best new science books this spring.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Audiofile: Real life Dr Dolittles
Will we ever be able to talk to animals? In this episode, Geoff Marsh meets a variety of researchers and animals who persevere at the communication barrier in the name of science.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 23 April 2015
This week, a new treatment for Ebola, the making of the Tibetan plateau, and could bees be addicted to pesticides?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature: Backchat April 2015
The periodic table’s fuzzy edges, the nuances of reporting on animal research, and Richard gets charged up about some overhyped coverage of a new battery.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 16 April 2015
This week, how oxytocin affects the brain, self- experimentation in science, and the wedding rings that went to Hubble.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 9 April 2015
This week, the Moon and her sister, the Sun and its personality, and the latest wonder material to hit the big-time.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 2 April 2015
This week, improving walking, pushing the boundary between quantum and classical, and the need for more social science on climate change.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 26 March 2015
This week, the role of black holes in growing galaxies, Dragon’s Den for scientists, and ice inside our bodies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat
Where will NASA’s next planetary mission go? Plus, a gene editing technique comes under fire, and the American editors’ biggest language gripes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Geoff Marsh reads you his favourite from March, Perfection, by John Frizell.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 19 March 2015
This week, bright light’s protective effect on the developing eyeball, early photography’s impact on science and the British genome unveiled.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Audiofile: Music and the making of science
Is music simply a pleasant accompaniment to thought, or a driving force behind it? This show examines music’s influence on the development of modern science and the foundations of acoustics. Lute music courtesy of Naxos Licensing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Podcast: 12 March 2015
This week, how English became the dominant language of science, carbon capture gets a boost and how to define the Anthropocene.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 5 March 2015
This week, the human family tree gets even more tangled, should universities stop investing in fossil fuels, and Ebola’s impact on mothers-to-be.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Futures
Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Noah Baker reads you his favourite from February, Good for something by Deborah Walker.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....

Nature Extra: Backchat
An 'intelligent' computer that can learn to play arcade games, the power of text mining, and what ancient DNA can tell us about ancient languages.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....


Nature Podcast: 26 February 2015
This week, preparing to meet Pluto, food additives with health risks, and measuring pain in the brain - is it ready for the courtroom?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....