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The Outside Interview: The Whole Life Challenge Is Easier Than You Think

Outside Podcast

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The Outside Interview: The Whole Life Challenge Is Easier Than You Think

Outside Podcast

Outside's longstanding literary storytelling tradition comes to life in audio with features that will entertain, inspire, and inform listeners. We launched in March 2016 with our first series, Science of Survival, which was developed in partnership with PRX, distributors of the idolized This American Life and The Moth Radio Hour, among others. We have since added three additional series, The Outside Interview, which has editor Christopher Keyes interrogating the biggest figures in sports, adventure, and politics, Dispatches, a diverse range of stories on newsworthy topics, and Sweat Science, which explores the outer limits of athletic performance.

Outside Podcast

Andy Petranek and Michael Stanwyck know fitness. Petranek was a former adventure racer and RedBull Athlete before founding one of the first CrossFit gyms. Soon after, Stanwyck walked in looking for a new type of workout and quickly became CrossFit LA’s manager. But while their classes made gym members stronger, the pair longed to have a more holistic impact on their clients. In 2011, they created the Whole Life Challenge, a six-week program that focuses on seven lifestyle changes that optimize well-being. The Challenge, which turns healthy living into a game, now attracts more than 50,000 participants a year. Last week, Petranek and Stanwyck sat down with Outside editor Chris Keyes to discuss the problem with diets, the keys to changing habits, the power of crowds, and how small lifestyle changes add up to make a big difference.

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