The Daily

The Daily Podcast

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Anatomy of a Warren Rally
With crowds that are said to number 15,000 to 20,000 people, Senator Elizabeth Warren’s campaign events frequently dwarf those of her Democratic rivals. This week, we experienced the growing phenomenon that is the Warren rally. Guest: Thomas Kaplan, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Ms. Warren, running on a message of sweeping change, is solidifying her place in an exclusive club of presidential candidates wh...

Keeping Harvey Weinstein’s Secrets, Part 2: Gloria Allred
In Part 1 of this series, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey reported on Lisa Bloom, a victims’ rights attorney who used her experience representing women to defend Harvey Weinstein. In Part 2, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom’s mother, the women’s rights lawyer Gloria Allred. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, ...

Keeping Harvey Weinstein’s Secrets, Part 1: Lisa Bloom
Last week, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey published a book documenting their investigation of Harvey Weinstein. In writing it, they discovered information about two feminist icons — Gloria Allred and her daughter, Lisa Bloom — that raises questions about their legacies and the legal system in which they’ve worked. Today, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom, a lawyer who represented Mr. Weinstein. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors o...


Who Really Attacked Saudi Arabia?
President Trump is saying that Iran appears to be responsible for the weekend attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia. We look at where things are likely to go from here. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump said that the United States was prepared for war if necessary, but that he would “like to avoid” a military conflict with Iran.Mr. Trump’s response to t...

Who Really Attacked Saudi Arabia?
President Trump is saying that Iran appears to be responsible for the weekend attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia. We look at where things are likely to go from here. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump said that the United States was prepared for war if necessary, but that he would “like to avoid” a military conflict with Iran.Mr. Trump’s response to t...

The C.I.A. Spy Inside the Kremlin
Last week, CNN broke the story that the United States had secretly extracted a top spy from Russia in 2017. What does that mean now for American intelligence operations? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Moscow informant was instrumental to the C.I.A.’s conclusion that President Vladimir V. Putin had ordered and orchestrated Russia’s election interference campaign....


‘1619,’ Episode 4: How the Bad Blood Started
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 4 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. Guests: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoin...

‘1619,’ Episode 4: How the Bad Blood Started
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 4 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. Guests: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoin...

The Third Democratic Debate
Just 10 candidates qualified for the stage in Houston, but that didn’t change some recurring themes: Joe Biden was again the target of fierce scrutiny, and health care was a central point of contention. But what else did we learn?Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Attacks on Mr. Biden highlighted the divide over the Obama legacy, with the former vice president repeatedly invoking ...


An Interview With Andrew Yang, the Outsider at Tonight’s Democratic Debate
Andrew Yang, a former tech executive, remains one of the least known candidates in a Democratic presidential field that includes senators, mayors, a governor and a former vice president. But by focusing on the potential impact of automation on jobs, he has attracted surprisingly loyal and passionate support. One of our technology writers has been following his campaign since before it officially began. Guests: Andrew Yang, a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination; and Kevin Roose, who writes a...

John Bolton Is Fired. Or Did He Resign?
John Bolton, the national security adviser, was ousted after fundamental disputes with President Trump over how to handle foreign policy challenges like Afghanistan, Iran and North Korea. But the two men disagreed about how they parted ways. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:President Trump said he fired John Bolton; Mr. Bolton insisted that he had resigned. Regardless, they ...

A Historic Peace Plan Collapses
President Trump abruptly called off negotiations between the United States and the Taliban that could have ended the war in Afghanistan and canceled a secret meeting at Camp David. We look at how a historic peace deal went off the rails. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The United States and the Taliban, after nine rounds of painstaking negotiations in Doha, Qatar, appeared ...


Parliament Strikes Back in Britain
In a battle over what kind of democracy would prevail in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemed to have gained the upper hand by cutting Parliament out of Brexit — until last week. Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In Washington, scarcely a handful of Republicans have stood up to President Trump. In comparison, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has found lawmakers in his Conservative P...

‘1619,’ Episode 3: The Birth of American Music
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 3 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times.This episode contains explicit language.Background reading: “The proliferation of black music across the planet — the proliferation, in so many senses...

The Secret Push to Strike Iran
For almost two decades, the United States and Israel have tried to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. Israeli leaders — including the current prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu — have pushed for a military strike on Iran, a prospect that American presidents have long opposed. But a Times investigation reveals a secret history that shows how close the three countries came to war. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s epi...


Walmart Enters the Gun Control Debate
A month after a gunman killed 22 people at a Walmart store in El Paso, the nation’s largest retailer, said that it would stop selling ammunition used for handguns and military-style weapons and call on Congress to consider a new ban on assault rifles. We look at what Walmart’s move means, and how corporate America could play a role in curbing the epidemic of gun violence. Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/theda...

The Sudden-Death Phase of the Democratic Primary
The Democratic presidential race has entered a phase that is specifically designed to reward front-runners and push out lesser-known candidates. We look at how that will influence the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: Which candidates are leading the Democratic primary? Here’s a look at the state of the race.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about the intended and ...

A Potential Peace Deal With the Taliban
After months of negotiations in Qatar, the United States appeared to have reached an agreement with the Taliban that could take a step to end America’s longest-running war. We spoke with our colleague about what he learned while covering the peace talks. Guest: Mujib Mashal, a senior correspondent for The New York Times based in Afghanistan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: The American special envoy who led talks with the Taliban said that the United...


’1619,’ Episode 2: The Economy That Slavery Built
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast.The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the au...

Political Mayhem in Britain and Italy
Two battles over the meaning of democracy are now playing out in Europe. We look at the political power maneuvers this week in Britain and Italy. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: Facing a furious backlash over his decision to suspend Parliament next month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain promised to speed up Brexit negotiations with Brussels.In Italy, two political parties...

Why Uber Still Can’t Make a Profit
Uber transformed American transportation and changed the United States economy. But a decade after its founding, the once-swaggering company is losing more money and growing more slowly than ever. What happened? Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology reporter for The New York Times and the author of “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: The Uber of 2019 displays little of the braggadocio of its past, and competitors and critic...


Why the Amazon Is Burning
More than 26,000 fires have been recorded inside the Amazon rainforest in August alone, leading to global calls for action. But Brazil’s government has told the rest of the world to mind its own business. Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: Brazil began a military operation to battle the fires after European leaders threatened to cancel a trade deal and calls to boycott Brazilian pro...

How the U.S.-China Trade War Hurts the Rest of the World
At the Group of 7 summit in France, President Trump seemed determined to prove that he can wage a trade war with China without hurting the economy. But there are already signs of distress. Guest: Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage: President Trump can confront China or expand the economy, but he can’t do both at the same time, our economics correspondent writes in a news analysis.Mr. Tr...

The First Women to Report Jeffrey Epstein
This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault. Nearly a decade before any police investigation into Jeffrey Epstein’s predatory actions toward young girls, two sisters came forward to say they had been lured in and abused by the financier and his companion, Ghislaine Maxwell. Now that he’s dead, the sisters are wrestling with what might have happened if someone had listened.Guests: Mike Baker, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Maria and Annie Farmer, and shared their story w...


Introducing ‘1619,’ a New York Times Audio Series
Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.“1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.”Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information o...

What the 2020 Campaign Sounds Like
Song playlists at presidential campaign rallies can be about more than music — they can reflect a candidate’s values, political platform, identity and target audience. We examine the role of these playlists in the 2020 campaign. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The Times analyzed playlists used by nine Democratic candidates and President Trump to see how they help set the ton...

What American C.E.O.s Are Worried About
For decades, American corporations have prized profits for shareholders above all else. Now, the country’s most powerful chief executives say it’s time to do things differently. What’s driving that change? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Almost 200 chief executives, including the leaders of Apple, Pepsi and Walmart, argued that companies must invest in employees, protect the envi...


Senator Kirsten Gillibrand on Not Regretting Al Franken
Al Franken resigned from the Senate more than 18 months ago over allegations of sexual harassment. New reporting about those allegations has revived the debate over whether the Democratic Party — particularly senators currently seeking the presidency — moved too fast in calling for him to step down. In an interview, one of those senators, Kirsten Gillibrand, says absolutely not.Guest: Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a New York Democrat and 2020 presidential candidate. For more information on today’s episode, vi...

Bankrolling the Anti-Immigration Movement
The New York Times investigated how Cordelia Scaife May, an heiress to the Mellon family’s banking and industrial fortune, used her wealth to sow the seeds of the modern anti-immigration movement — and of Trump administration policy. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times, spoke with Nicholas Kulish, who covers immigration issues. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Newly unearthed documents show how an environmental-minded socialite ...

Russia’s Mystery Missile
At least seven people were killed by a mysterious explosion in northern Russia, and U.S. officials believe it happened during the test of a prototype for a nuclear-propelled cruise missile. President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has hailed the weapon as the centerpiece of Moscow’s arms race with the United States — but what will this mean for an arms race that both countries want to win? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode,...


Is China Really Freeing Uighurs?
Under international pressure, China has said it has released a vast majority of the Muslim Uighurs it had placed in detention camps. We follow up with an American citizen who says the Chinese government cannot be trusted, and find out how Beijing’s propaganda machine has responded to his efforts to protect a relative who was detained. If you missed the previous interview, listen to it here. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur ...

Inside Hong Kong’s Airport
Protesters have flooded Hong Kong’s airport, paralyzing operations and escalating tensions between the semiautonomous territory and Beijing. The protesters are trying to send a message to government officials — and to people in mainland China. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Demonstrations led the airport, one of the world’s busiest, to suspend check-ins for two days in a row ...

The Epstein Investigation, Now That He’s Dead
Federal prosecutors were confident that, this time, justice would be served in the case of Jeffrey Epstein. What happens to the case against him now that he is dead?  Guest: Benjamin Weiser, an investigative criminal justice reporter for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Despite Jeffrey Epstein's death, the criminal investigation that led to the sex-trafficking charges continues. Prosecutors will focus on those who may have aided him.A...


The Freshmen: Mikie Sherrill
Since Democrats retook the House last November, the world has come to know the progressive and divisive vision of four freshmen congresswomen known as “the squad.” But it was moderates — less well-known and laser-focused on common ground between Democrats and Republicans — who were responsible for flipping seats and winning back the House. Today, we meet a moderate Democrat who offers a competing vision of the party ahead of the 2020 election. Guests: Representative Mikie Sherrill, Democrat of New Jersey; K...

The Crackdown on Kashmir
India has guaranteed a degree of autonomy to the people of Kashmir, a disputed territory between India and Pakistan, since 1947. Why did India unilaterally erase that autonomy this week? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: To Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India, eliminating the autonomy of Kashmir was an administrative move. But to his critics, the decision was a blow to India’...

Two Cities in Mourning
President Trump traveled on Wednesday to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, where mass shootings killed 31 people. Our colleagues described the scene in both cities. Guests: Mitch Smith, who covers the Midwest for The New York Times, and Michael Crowley, a White House correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump began a day set aside for healing in Dayton and El Paso by lashing out at rivals, using the kind of divisive language that prompted...


Osama bin Laden’s Successor
In the years before his death, Osama bin Laden seemed to be grooming a successor to lead Al Qaeda: his own son. Here’s what we learned this week about those plans. Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The care Osama bin Laden showed his son was not just fatherly, but appears to have been an attempt by the world’s most hunted terrorist to secure his legacy.The United States had a role i...

Shutting Down 8chan
At least three mass shootings this year — including one in El Paso — have been announced in advance on the online message board 8chan, often accompanied by racist writings. We look at the battle over shutting down the site. Guests: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times, spoke with Fredrick Brennan, the founder of 8chan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Fredrick Brennan started 8chan as a free speech utopia. But the site became ...

Two Days, Two Cities, Two Massacres
In two days, in two cities — El Paso and Dayton, Ohio — two mass shootings have left at least 29 people dead. We look at two stories from one of those shootings. Guests: Simon Romero, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign, spoke with us from El Paso. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: The back-to-back bursts of gun violence left a nation stunned and shaken.The shooting rampage ...


How the Democratic Debates Narrow the Field
Twenty Democratic presidential candidates have appeared on the debate stage for the last time. That’s in part because the Democratic National Committee has introduced a set of rules explicitly designed to narrow the field. We look at the intended and unintended consequences of that change. Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: It will be twice as hard for the 2020 Democrats to qualify for ...

The Economy Is Booming. Or Is It?
The United States economy is in the middle of a record-long expansion. So why is the government deploying an economic weapon it last used during the 2008 financial crisis? Guest: Ben Casselman, who covers the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate for the first time in more than a decade as it tried to insulate the economy from President Trump’s trade war and a global slowdow...

What Does Kamala Harris Stand For?
Democratic voters have been drawn to Senator Kamala Harris as a messenger, even though her message remains a work in progress. Ahead of her second presidential debate appearance, we consider what the candidate says she believes. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times, spoke with Ms. Harris. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Ms. Harris says she wants relevant policy, not “a beautiful sonnet.” Is that enough for voters...


The Origins of Boeing’s 737 Max Crisis
Two crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets have been linked to a software system that helped send the planes into a deadly nose-dive. Our colleague investigated what federal regulators responsible for ensuring the safety of the jets knew about that system. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A Times investigation found that the Federal Aviation Administration’s regulatory process, which g...

A Plan to End Partisan Gerrymandering
The Supreme Court ruled last month that federal courts cannot rule on cases of partisan gerrymandering, saying that judges are not entitled to second-guess the decisions made by state legislators who draw voting maps. We spoke to one man who has long believed there’s a way to address the issue without the courts. Guest: Eric H. Holder Jr., who served as the United States attorney general for six years under President Barack Obama. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Backgrou...

The Next Chapter of the Epstein Story
Maxwell’s yearslong relationship with Jeffrey Epstein has raised questions about what she may have known about the allegations of sex trafficking against him. Now, thousands of pages of sealed documents stemming from their relationship are about to be made public. Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:With Mr. Epstein under federal indictment on charges of sexually trafficking and abusing ...


Robert Mueller’s Testimony
The former special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, testified on Wednesday before Congress. He declared that his two-year investigation did not exonerate President Trump and that Russia would meddle again in American elections. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Lawmakers hunted for viral sound bites and tried to score political points, but Mr. Muelle...

‘Send Her Back’: White Voters and Trump’s Path to Re-election
The majority of Americans disapprove of President Trump. But in 2020, Democrats will still have a hard time defeating him. Here’s why. Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump’s edge in the Electoral College may leave him closer to re-election than one might think based on his approval ratings — and may also blunt the electoral cost of actions...

Special Edition: A Guide to the Mueller Hearings
Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee and the House Intelligence Committee beginning at 8:30 a.m. Eastern on Wednesday. We spoke to our colleague about what to expect. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Read more about what you need to know before the testimony.Here are 19 lingering ques...


The Fight Over Planned Parenthood’s Future
Dr. Leana Wen, the first physician to lead Planned Parenthood in decades, was ousted after just eight months on the job. Her departure highlights a central tension over the direction of the group: Is it a political organization first, or a health organization? Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: As states began to pass ever more restrictive laws on abortion, Planned Parenthood’s leaders...

The Making of Boris Johnson
After trying and failing to withdraw Britain from the European Union, Theresa May will resign this week as the country’s prime minister. Here’s how the man expected to succeed her, Boris Johnson, made Brexit — and how Brexit may soon make him prime minister. Guest: Sarah Lyall, a writer at large for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Johnson has become one of the great escape artists of British politics.Some of Mr. Johnson’s family...

The Almost Moon Man
There are two stories from the 1960s that America likes to tell about itself — the civil rights movement and the space race. We look at the brief moment when the two collided. Guest: Emily Ludolph, who covered this story for The New York Times, spoke with Ed Dwight, a former Air Force pilot who had trained to be the first black astronaut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: President John F. Kennedy was Ed Dwight’s champion. Within weeks of the president’s...


The Political Crisis in Puerto Rico
Hundreds of leaked text messages revealed the governor of Puerto Rico mocking his own citizens. For many Puerto Ricans, it was the last straw. Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with us from San Juan, P.R. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Tens of thousands of people from across Puerto Rican society have united in nearly a week of protests that reveal deep dissatisfaction with how the island is governed....

The Myth That Busing Failed
The first Democratic debate brought renewed attention to busing as a tool of school desegregation. We spoke to a colleague about what the conversation has been missing. Guest: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes about racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: “The school bus, treasured when it was serving as a tool of segregation, became reviled only when it transformed into a tool of integration,” Nikole Hannah-Jon...

A Decision in the Eric Garner Case
One day before the fifth anniversary of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of police officers in New York, the Justice Department said it would not bring federal civil rights charges against an officer involved. We look at that decision. Guest: Ashley Southall, who covers New York for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Attorney General William P. Barr made the call not to seek a civil rights indictment against Officer Daniel Pantaleo.“T...


Trump and ‘the Squad’
In a second day of attacks, President Trump said that four Democratic congresswomen hated the United States and were free to leave the country. The lawmakers — Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan — said they refused to be silenced. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode includes distu...

Waiting for the Immigration Raids
This past weekend, immigration officials were scheduled to begin arresting and deporting thousands of undocumented immigrants who had been ordered to leave the United States but had remained. On Friday evening, we spoke to one woman who feared she was on the list. Guest: Herminia, an undocumented immigrant who has been living in the United States with her husband and children for more than a decade. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:A small number of raid...

Can Gun Makers Be Held Accountable for Mass Shootings?
As mass shootings became commonplace, attempts to hold gun makers accountable kept hitting the same roadblock — until now. We look at a lawsuit that could transform the firearms industry. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with David Wheeler, whose 6-year-old son, Ben, died in the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School; and Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Backgroun...


The President and the Census
Federal courts keep rejecting President Trump’s attempts to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census. But no matter what the courts decide, the president may have already achieved his goal. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A day after pledging that the census would not ask about citizenship, Justice Department officials said they were seeking a way to restore the question on order...

The Plan to Elect Republican Women
Out of 198 Republicans in the House of Representatives, just 13 are women. This week, a closely watched election in North Carolina may help determine how serious the party is about changing that. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Dr. Greg Murphy, a state representative and urological surgeon, defeated Dr. Joan Perry, a pediatrician, in a race that set off a clash at the highest l...

United States v. Jeffrey Epstein
Prosecutors in New York have accused the billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls and of asking them to recruit others. We spoke with our colleague about what happened in a similar case against Mr. Epstein over a decade ago. Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The new indictment of Mr. Epstein could prompt a reckoning for the Justice Department...


The Trial of a Navy SEAL Chief
The trial of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a decorated member of the Navy SEALs, offered rare insight into a culture that is, by design, difficult to penetrate. Our colleague tells us what he learned from the verdict. Guest: Dave Philipps, who covers the military for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: After a key witness for prosecutors changed his story on the stand, Chief Gallagher was found not guilty of the most serio...

When a G.M. Plant Shut Down in Ohio
In 2016, Lordstown, Ohio, helped deliver the presidency to Donald J. Trump, betting that he would fulfill his promise to save its auto industry. Our colleague went there to examine the political fallout from the fact that he didn’t. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, met with Brian Milo, who worked at the General Motors plant in Lordstown for a decade; Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times, spoke with Sabrina. For more information on today’s episode, vi...

Joe Biden’s Record on Race
In the contest to become the Democratic candidate for president, Joseph R. Biden Jr. is being asked to confront his record on race, including past positions that some in his party now see as outdated and unjust. We look at the policies Mr. Biden embraced and how they were viewed at the time. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Biden’s efforts to play down his role in overhau...


What Iran Is Learning From North Korea
President Trump made history over the weekend when he became the first sitting American president to step into North Korea. But the biggest impact of that gesture may have been on Iran. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Trump administration officials are at odds over what demands to make in ne...

Inside the Migrant Detention Center in Clint, Tex.
Federal courts have ruled that migrant children inside the United States must be housed in “safe and sanitary” accommodation. So what explains the conditions at a Border Patrol station in Clint, Tex.? Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Soiled clothes, no diapers and no access to showers or soap — read more about the conditions that migrant children faced in an overcrowded border sta...

A Clash Over Inclusion at Pride
Fifty years after the Stonewall riots, as the largest L.G.B.T.Q. Pride celebration in the world takes place in New York this weekend, some leaders of the community are asking a difficult question: What’s lost as the Pride movement becomes mainstream? Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shane O’Neill, a video editor. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Divisions have emerged in the L.G.B.T.Q. community over the r...


The Democratic Debates
Twenty Democrats seeking their party’s presidential nomination have now made their case to American voters. We take a look at their visions for the future, the breakout performances and the state of the race. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Here are takeaways from the first night and the second night of the debates.See which candidates spoke the most on Wednesday and on Thurs...

Corroborating E. Jean Carroll
Note: This episode contains detailed descriptions of an alleged sexual assault.The writer E. Jean Carroll came forward last week with explosive accusations that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in the 1990s. Today, the two women she privately confided in after the alleged attack go on the record for the first time with our colleague. Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Ms. Carroll, Lisa Birnbach and Carol Martin. For more information on today’s episode, visi...

A Guide to the Democratic Debates
Over the next two days, 20 Democrats will take the stage for the first debates of the 2020 presidential race. We look at the competing visions for America they’ll be fighting over this week, and throughout the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Does anyone deserve to have a billion dollars? How many hours of sleep do you get? The Times asked 21 Democratic presidential ...


The Likelihood of Impeachment
In the weeks since the Mueller report, nearly 80 House Democrats have called for impeaching the president. But with the 2020 campaign underway, the likelihood of such action appears to be fading. That may be exactly what some Democratic leaders want. Guests: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times, spoke with Representative Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background r...

A Military Crackdown in Sudan
A military crackdown in Sudan has left more than 100 pro-democracy protesters dead, just weeks after the military offered support in overthrowing the country’s dictator. Our colleague spoke with us from Sudan’s capital, Khartoum. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, the leader of the paramilitary forces that carried out the killings, is now considered by many to be ...

The Standoff With Iran
The Trump administration has been debating a military strike against Iran as tensions with the country escalate. Here’s how we got to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump approved military strikes against Iran in retaliation for downing an American drone, but abruptly called them off on Thursday night.Mr. Trump has veered between bellicose threats against Am...


Why Asylum Seekers Are Being Sent Back to Mexico
With asylum requests at a record high, the Trump administration is telling migrants to wait in Mexico. We look at how that policy could fundamentally change immigration in the United States. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zolan Kanno-Youngs, who covers homeland security. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A recent State Department report acknowledged the possibility that migrants from Central America were...

Trump’s Re-election Rally
The president kicked off his re-election campaign on Tuesday with a rally in Orlando, Fla. We spoke with a colleague who was there. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump’s messaging at the rally signals a bet that his 2020 campaign will be a replay of 2016 — but this time, with the full support of the Republican Party.Here are eight things our reporters learned from a...

Hacking the Russian Power Grid
A New York Times investigation found that the United States is actively infiltrating Russia’s electric power grid. We look at what that means for the future of cyberwarfare. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The cyberattacks on Russia’s power grid are intended partly as a warning, and partly t...


Why Hong Kong Is Still Protesting
In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don’t trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong’s leader were aimed at mol...

Part 5: Can Liberal Democracy Survive in Europe?
Across Europe, populists are saying that it’s not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there.Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more information on today’s ...

Part 4: Poland’s Culture Wars
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and...


Part 3: ‘Italy First’
In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to become part of the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on toda...

Part 2: The French Rebellion
President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” ...

Part 1: The Battle for Europe
The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In a five-part series this week, we take a look at some of the movements aiming to disrupt the E.U. from within. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Befo...


A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 2: The Future of Genetic Privacy
The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The case of William Earl Talbot...

A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 1: The Genetic Detectives
A year after police used a genetic database to help identify a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, the same technique has been used to arrest dozens of people. Now, for the first time, one of those cases is headed to trial. In Part 1 of a two-part series, we look at the tool that is transforming law enforcement and testing the limits of privacy. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch; Peter Headley, a detective with the S...

This Drug Could End H.I.V. Why Hasn’t It?
Dr. Robert Grant developed a treatment — a daily pill known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP — that could stop the AIDS crisis. We look at why that hasn’t happened. Guests: Dr. Grant, who has been working on H.I.V. treatment and prevention for over 30 years, and Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Gilead Sciences, the maker of Truvada, the only drug approved to prevent H.I.V. ...


How a Secret U.S. Cyberweapon Backfired
A criminal group has held computer systems for the city of Baltimore hostage for nearly a month — paralyzing everything from email to the real estate market to the payment of water bills. But what residents don’t know is that a major component of the malware used to shut down the system was developed nearby by a federal government agency. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security and the U.S. intelligence community for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/the...

The Legacy of Rachel Held Evans
In a brief but prolific career, a young writer asked whether evangelical Christianity could change. In doing so, she changed it. Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times, in conversation with Natalie Kitroeff.  For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Read the Times obituary for Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith...

Death, Profit and Disclosure at a Children’s Hospital
A Times investigation found that doctors at UNC Children’s Hospital suspected that children with complex heart conditions had been dying at higher-than-expected rates, and even children with low-risk conditions seemed to do poorly. Secret recordings shared with our colleague reveal what was happening inside the hospital. Guest: Ellen Gabler, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Limited information released b...


Robert Mueller Breaks His Silence
Robert Mueller, the special counsel, discussed his investigation of Russian election interference for the first time on Wednesday. He did not absolve President Trump of obstruction of justice, saying: “If we had enough confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so.” Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The news co...

The White House Plan to Change Climate Science
From Day 1, the Trump administration has tried to dismantle regulations aimed at curbing climate change. Now officials are attempting to undermine the very science on which such policies rest. Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Parts of the federal government will no longer fulfill what scientists say is one of the most urgent jobs of climate science studies: repor...

What Actually Happened to New York’s Taxi Drivers
In the past year, many New York City taxi drivers have fallen deeper into debt, even as the city moved to rein in ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft. Our colleague explains how the rush to blame those apps shielded those who were really behind the crisis. Guests: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro desk of The New York Times, and Nicolae Hent, a taxi driver in New York City.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A spate of suicides b...


Confronting a Childhood Abuser
Three months ago, a recording of Sterling Van Wagenen, a founder of the Sundance Film Festival, appeared on an obscure website for whistle-blowers in the Mormon Church. The “Daily” producer Annie Brown spoke with our colleague about the story that recording told. Guest: Elizabeth Harris, a culture reporter for The New York Times, talked to Sean Escobar, who made the recording of Mr. Van Wagenen.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains descriptions of abuse.B...

The Bank That Kept Saying Yes to Trump
At a time when most Wall Street firms had stopped doing business with Donald J. Trump, a single bank lent him more than $2 billion. We look at the two-decade relationship that could unlock the president’s financial secrets. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with David Enrich, the finance editor and author of the forthcoming book “Dark Towers: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Destructive Bank.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. ...

A Growing Call for Impeachment
In the weeks since the release of the Mueller report, the Democratic Party has been struggling with how to proceed. Now, divisions are emerging as a group of House members push their leaders to open impeachment proceedings. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Some liberal Democrats called for an impeachment inquiry of President Trump after the former White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn ...


The Rise of Modi: India’s Rightward Turn
India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has governed as a right-wing populist whose nationalist message has often pitted Hindus against Muslims. We look at what Mr. Modi’s likely re-election this week tells us about the country’s political future. Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Mr. Modi’s Hindu nationalist politics and his efforts to project a strong image of India abroad ap...

The Legal Vulnerability of Roe v. Wade
From the day Roe v. Wade was decided, some have seen the constitutional right to an abortion as an inferred right rather than a guaranteed one. That distinction has become a threat to the law’s survival. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Because the court led by Chief Justice John Roberts tends toward incrementa...

A Direct Challenge to Roe v. Wade in Alabama
Alabama has adopted a law that would criminalize nearly all abortions and make the penalty for providing one up to 99 years in prison. The man who wrote the law knew it was unconstitutional — and did it anyway. We asked him why. Guests: Eric Johnston, a lawyer in Alabama who has spent more than 30 years trying to ban abortion, and Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: States across the count...


Caught in the Middle of the Trade War
Yesterday, we told the story of President Trump’s trade war with China. Today, our colleague speaks with two Americans who have been feeling the effects of that war. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, talked to Kevin Watje, a truck manufacturer in Iowa, and Eldon Gould, a farmer in Illinois. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:President Trump’s tariffs, initially seen as a cudgel to break down trade barriers, increasingly...

The President Takes On China, Alone
Years of multinational efforts have failed to get China to play by the international rules of trade. Now, President Trump has launched an all-out trade war in which the United States is confronting China on its own. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The intensifying trade war between the United States and China, the two largest e...

The Freshmen: Rashida Tlaib, Part 2
When we last spoke with Representative Rashida Tlaib, she had just been sworn in — and had fulfilled the fears of Democratic leaders by calling for the impeachment of President Trump. In the months since, she’s been challenging her party on a different front, attracting controversy for her criticisms of Israel, which some have characterized as anti-Semitic.Ms. Tlaib has repeatedly denied that there’s any anti-Semitism behind what she’s said. But she hasn’t spoken at length about the controversy or explained...


John Bolton’s Plan for Iran
Iran is warning that it may resume production on its nuclear program, reviving a crisis that had been contained by the signing of the Iran nuclear deal four years ago. One man within the United States government may have intentionally brought us to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: After President Hassan Rouhani of Iran declared that he would begin to walk away from the t...

A Founder of Facebook Says It’s Time to Break It Up
Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder and Mark Zuckerberg’s college roommate, has written an Op-Ed in The New York Times saying that Mr. Zuckerberg has become too powerful and that Facebook should be broken up. Our colleague sits down with him to talk about why he’s speaking out. Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology writer for The Times who interviewed Mr. Hughes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: “It’s been 15 years since I co-founded Facebook at Harvard, an...

Holding the Attorney General in Contempt
The House Judiciary Committee voted to recommend holding Attorney General William Barr in contempt after President Trump asserted executive privilege over the full Mueller report. But little is likely to happen as a result. We look at why Congress is running out of options for investigating the president. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The House Judiciary Committee voted 24 to 1...


$1 Billion in Losses: A Decade of Trump’s Taxes
In October, The New York Times published an investigation into the tax returns of President Trump’s father, revealing the president’s past involvement in tax evasion and stark inconsistencies in his account of his success. Two reporters who broke that story are back with new information about the president’s own taxes. Guests: Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Times has obtained...

The Chinese Surveillance State, Part 2
In Part 2 of our series, we tell the story of an American citizen whose family members have been detained in Chinese re-education camps for Uighurs and members of other Muslim minority groups. We look at what his efforts to free them reveal about the global reach of China’s surveillance. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur and American citizen who lives in Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/th...

The Chinese Surveillance State, Part 1
Under President Xi Jinping, China is pioneering a new form of governance by surveillance. In the first of a two-part series, we look at how China tested that system by targeting one minority group. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Chinese authorities are expanding an extensive surveillance net by using a vast, secret system of facial recognition technology to control the...


A Secret Dossier in Venezuela
After mass protests and international pressure failed to unseat President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela, it became clear that it would take defections from within his own government to remove him from power. Now, secret documents suggest that some of Mr. Maduro’s people are starting to turn on him. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A secret dossier compiled by Venezuela’s intelligence a...

The Senate Testimony of William Barr
In testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General William Barr defended his handling of the Mueller report, saying he did not misrepresent its findings. We spoke with our colleague who spent the day in the hearing room. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: At a contentious hearing marked by a deep partisan divide, the center of the clash was nothing less than the preside...

A Dictator’s Fall in Sudan
After a brutal 30-year reign, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir of Sudan has been deposed by his own generals. The story of one of those generals and his son could signal what comes next for the country. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with Lt. Gen. Salah Abdelkhalig and Abdelkhalig Salah in Khartoum, Sudan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: When Sudan’s Air Force chief stepped out to address a crowd calling for t...


A Crisis at the N.R.A.
A bitter power struggle has broken out inside the nation’s pre-eminent gun rights group. We look at how the mere threat of a financial investigation plunged the National Rifle Association into crisis. Guest: Danny Hakim, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, spoke with us from the N.R.A.’s annual convention in Indianapolis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Wayne LaPierre was unanimously re-elected as chief executive of the N.R.A. after infig...

Why the Supreme Court Is Ruling on the Census
Before the 2020 census begins in the United States, a case has been fast-tracked to the nation’s highest court about who is counted and why. It has become the biggest case in front of the Supreme Court this session. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Supreme Court’s conservative majority appeared ready to allow the Trump administration to add a question about citizenship status ...

How the Measles Outbreak Started
The number of measles cases in the United States has risen to nearly 700 — the highest annual number recorded since 2000, when the disease was declared eliminated in the country. Many of those cases can be traced to ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in New York. Guest: Sarah Maslin Nir, who covers New York City for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Officials in New York have taken extraordinary measures to fight the measles outbreak, i...


A Secret in the Navy SEALs
Navy SEAL commandos said they had seen their decorated platoon leader, Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, commit war crimes. They were warned not to report it. They did so anyway. Guest: Dave Philipps, who covers the military for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:A confidential Navy criminal investigation report obtained by The Times paints a disturbing picture of a subculture within the SEALs that prized aggression and protect...

The Terrorist Attacks in Sri Lanka
A series of highly coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka has left more than 350 people dead. How did a small, obscure and underfinanced local group carry out one of the deadliest terrorist attacks since 9/11? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the bombings, but the extent of its involvement is not yet clear.Here’s what we currently know a...

The Whistle-Blowers at Boeing
After two crashes of Boeing 737 Max jets, regulators and lawmakers began asking whether competitive pressure may have led the company to miss safety risks, like an anti-stall system that played a role in both crashes. In reporting that story, our colleagues began to look into whether the problems extended beyond the 737 Max. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes....


How Trump’s Protector Became Mueller’s Best Witness
The most interesting figure in the Mueller report may be the man who was hired to protect President Trump, but turned out to be the most damaging witness against him. We look at the role of Donald F. McGahn II, the former White House counsel. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Mr. McGahn’s interviews — including an account of being asked by President ...

The Mueller Report Is Released
Two years and 448 pages later, a redacted version of the Mueller report has been made public. Here’s what we’ve learned. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt and Mark Mazzetti, who have been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language.Background reading:The Mueller report laid out the scope of Russian election interference and President Trump’s frantic efforts to thwart the special coun...

The Abortion Wars, Part 2: The Illinois Option
Four states have passed laws this year that effectively ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, and others, including Missouri, are expected to follow suit. Some Missourians are crossing the state line to Illinois, where abortion access is protected. We spent a day at a clinic in Illinois with three women who were getting abortions. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit ny...


The Abortion Wars, Part 1: The Last Clinic in Missouri
When Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s ascendance to the Supreme Court threw the future of abortion rights into question, states scrambled to enact new laws. Two neighboring states in the Midwest are moving in opposite directions: Missouri is taking action to end abortion access, while Illinois is trying to preserve it. In a two-part series, we explore what those changes look like on the ground.Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for “The Daily...

The Rise and Fall of Carlos Ghosn
Carlos Ghosn, the former head of Nissan, was the rare foreign executive to reach rock-star status in Japan by breaking the rules of its culture. Now, he’s accused of financial wrongdoing at the company he helped save. Guest: Motoko Rich, the Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Mr. Ghosn has been arrested on charges of financial misconduct at Nissan. He said in a video statement that the accusations were part of a p...

The Moral Complexities of Working With Julian Assange
Many have considered Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, to be a hero of the free speech movement and a partner to journalists. He also came to be seen as a threat to national security. Then, he helped Russia interfere in a United States election. And now, he has been arrested. Our colleague tells us about the moral complexities of working with Mr. Assange. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security for The New York Times, has been following Mr. Assange’s decade-long saga. For more information o...


Israel’s Election, Through the Eyes of a Young Palestinian
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has promised to assert sovereignty over dozens of Jewish settlements on the West Bank. For Palestinians there, that could mean the end of a decades-long struggle for a state of their own. We hear the perspective of one young man living on the West Bank. Guest: Fadi Quran, who grew up in a Palestinian community near an Israeli settlement. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Netanyahu Won. The Two-State Solution Lost.
President Trump has promised to broker the deal of the century between Israelis and Palestinians. His partnership with Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, may have made such a peace deal all but impossible. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

When the Lights Went Out in Venezuela
Economic collapse, crumbling infrastructure, a contested presidential election result — Venezuela was already in crisis. Then the power went out. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times, who recently returned from Venezuela. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Brief, Controversial Tenure of Kirstjen Nielsen
Kirstjen Nielsen was forced out as secretary of homeland security, even after carrying out and defending President Trump’s hard-line immigration policies. We look at why that wasn’t enough. Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

A Russian Assassin Tells His Story
Under President Vladimir Putin, Russia has carried out a brazen campaign of state-sponsored assassinations. Our colleague tracked down one of the hitmen. Guest: Michael Schwirtz, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Oleg Smorodinov, a Russian hit man. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Battle to Control the Murdoch Media Empire
Through his media empire, Rupert Murdoch has reshaped the politics of countries across the English-speaking world, pushing their governments to the right. We look inside the struggle over who will control that empire once he’s gone. Guests: Jonathan Mahler and Jim Rutenberg, who spent six months investigating the Murdoch family for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


New Insights Into the Mueller Report
The special counsel’s team sent its report to the attorney general, William P. Barr, who sent a summary of that report to Congress. But some members of the special counsel’s team have told associates that their findings are more troubling for President Trump than Mr. Barr indicated. Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times, and Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Trump Wanted to Scrap Obamacare. His Party Didn’t.
President Trump has backed away from his call to replace the Affordable Care Act with a Republican alternative. Why did his own party talk him out of it? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Agony of Being Theresa May
After months of trying and failing to pass a deal on Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union, Prime Minister Theresa May had one final thing to offer: herself. Guest: Ellen Barry, chief international correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

One Family’s Story of Survival and Loss in New Zealand
New Zealand is holding a national day of remembrance today for the 50 people killed in the mosque shootings in Christchurch. Our colleague spent several days with one family of one man who died in the attack. Guest: Charlotte Graham-McLay, who spent time with the family of Atta Elayyan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Prosecuting R. Kelly
This year, Chicago’s top prosecutor, Kim Foxx, took the unusual step of asking women to come forward with allegations against the musician R. Kelly. In an interview, she explained that decision. Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Ms. Foxx. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Israel’s Indispensable Prime Minister?
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel faces indictment over an alleged scheme involving brazen acts of bribery and fraud. Why are so many Israelis ready to re-elect him? Guest: David M. Halbfinger, the Jerusalem bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Didn’t Mueller Decide on Obstruction?
The special counsel, Robert Mueller, was supposed to decide whether President Trump had committed a crime. Why did the attorney general, William P. Barr, do it instead? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Coordination: Not Established. Obstruction: More Complicated.
Attorney General William P. Barr sent a letter to Congress summarizing the Mueller report: The special counsel investigation did not establish coordination with Russia, but there was a more complicated story when it came to obstruction of justice. Guests: The Times reporters Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House; and Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Special Edition: Robert Mueller Submits His Report
The Mueller report has been sent to the attorney general. Here’s a look at what this means and what comes next. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

How New Zealand Banned Assault Rifles in Six Days
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern of New Zealand promised to change the country’s gun laws after a mass shooting in Christchurch left 50 people dead. Less than a week later, she did it. Guest: Jamie Tarabay, a New York Times correspondent based in Australia who has been reporting in New Zealand. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

A Path to Curing H.I.V.
For only the second time since the start of a global epidemic, a person was reported this month to have been cured of H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS. Scientists and activists had almost given up on reaching that milestone. Here’s a look at how we got to this point. Guest: Peter Staley, a longtime AIDS activist. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


‘Trump of the Tropics’: How Brazil’s President Came to Power
President Trump welcomed Brazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, to the White House on Tuesday. We look at the back story of Mr. Bolsonaro, whose campaign tactics, incendiary rhetoric and brash style have earned him the nickname “Trump of the tropics.” Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Two Crashes, a Single Jet: The Story of Boeing’s 737 Max
As Boeing developed a new line of passenger jets, it was determined to avoid costly training for pilots. Then, two of those jets crashed. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Mosque Attacks in New Zealand
A gunman opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, killing at least 50 people. The massacre was partly streamed online. We look at why the attack was, in some ways, made by and for the internet. Guest: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Family That Profited From the Opioid Crisis
The family that built its fortune on the opioid painkiller OxyContin has never been held legally accountable for the epidemic that the drug helped unleash. Here’s why that could change. Guest: Barry Meier, the author of “Pain Killer: An Empire of Deceit and the Origin of America’s Opioid Epidemic,” who has reported on the opioid crisis for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Bribing Their Way Into College
When a federal prosecutor revealed a $25 million scheme to seek an edge in college admissions for the children of celebrities, executives and other rich parents, he declared, “There can be no separate college admissions system for the wealthy.” But, as it turns out, there is. Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Katie Benner, who covers the Justice Department for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

How ‘Medicare for All’ Would Work (or Not Work)
“Medicare for all” has become a punching bag for Republicans and a rallying cry for many Democrats. But what exactly is it? Guest: Margot Sanger-Katz, who covers health care for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Part 3: What to Expect When You’re Expecting (the Mueller Report)
Once the special counsel’s report has been released, it’s up to Congress and its oversight committees to determine what happens next. We spoke to the head of the House Judiciary Committee, who will have to make that decision. Guest: Representative Jerry Nadler, Democrat of New York. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Part 2: What to Expect When You’re Expecting (the Mueller Report)
As the special counsel finishes his investigation, he can pursue three different paths — each with a profoundly different effect on how Congress will proceed. Recent history makes one of those paths especially treacherous. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Reckoning With the Real Michael Jackson
For decades, despite a swirl of allegations around him, Michael Jackson earned the world’s admiration, bewilderment and pity. A New York Times culture critic reflects on the moment the spell broke for him. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The Times and a host of the podcast “Still Processing.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode contains descriptions of abuse....


Promise and Peril of the Green New Deal
From the moment it was unveiled, a sweeping plan for tackling climate change called the Green New Deal has divided Democrats and handed a political weapon to Republicans. Here’s a look at the plan’s effects in Washington. Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and the environment for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Silicon Valley’s Military Dilemma
Across Silicon Valley, tech companies are pursuing contracts with the Defense Department. But seemingly lucrative deals can come with hidden costs. To explain, we look at a company that sold something to the military and later came to regret it. Guest: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What Happened to Lindsey Graham?
Two years ago, Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina called Donald Trump a “kook,” a “bigot,” “crazy” and “unfit for office.” Now he lavishes praise on the president at every turn. What’s going on? Guest: Mark Leibovich, who interviewed the senator for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Part 1: What to Expect When You’re Expecting (the Mueller Report)
There have only been a handful of investigations into possible criminal conduct by a sitting president of the United States. Each time, an outside investigator has been appointed under a set of rules to ensure independence and accountability — and those rules have changed with each inquiry. Now, the latest set of rules is being tested as the special counsel, Robert Mueller, prepares to release his report. Guest: Neal Katyal, a lawyer who drafted the regulations that govern the special counsel investigation....

Why the North Korea Deal Fell Apart (Again)
President Trump was so confident thahe would reach a nuclear pact with North Korea that he scheduled a signing ceremony before an agreement had even been struck. Here’s how it all unraveled. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Testimony of Michael Cohen
Michael Cohen is headed to prison for lying on behalf of Donald Trump. On Wednesday, he told Congress that he’s done protecting the president. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.  For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Fraudulent Election in North Carolina
For months, allegations of fraud have swirled around a congressional race in North Carolina’s Ninth District, but the Republican at the center of the controversy has held on. Why is he giving up now? Guest: Alan Blinder, who covers the American South for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What Hollywood Keeps Getting Wrong About Race
Three decades ago, the highest honor at the Academy Awards was given to a movie about a white passenger learning to love her black chauffeur. Sunday night, the same award was given to a film about a white chauffeur learning to love his black passenger. We look at Hollywood’s obsession with fantasies of racial reconciliation. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times and a host of the podcast “Still Processing.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Controlling 5G Could Mean Controlling the World
The United States believes that whoever controls fifth-generation cellular networks, known as 5G, will have a global advantage for decades to come. The fear is that China is almost there. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The American Women Who Joined ISIS
They left to join the so-called caliphate and took an oath of allegiance to a terrorist group intent on destroying the West. Now they want to come home. What should the United States do with the American wives of Islamic State fighters? Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism and the Islamic State for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

How New York Lost Amazon
Supporters promised an economic transformation that would benefit generations. Opponents feared a billion-dollar giveaway to one of the world’s richest companies. Here’s how the deal to bring Amazon to New York City fell apart. Guest: J. David Goodman, who covers New York politics for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Democratic Presidential Field (So Far)
Senator Bernie Sanders has entered a crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates. We look at how candidates who agree on many social issues are fighting to distinguish themselves in order to beat President Trump. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Democrats and Israel
In the weeks since they’ve taken office, two freshman Democrats — Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib — have been engulfed in controversy over their criticisms of Israel. We look at how, after decades of unwavering commitment to Israel, the Democratic Party is now dealing with charges of anti-Semitism. Guests: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times, and Jonathan Weisman, the deputy Washington editor of The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/th...

Avoiding a Shutdown (by Declaring an Emergency)
We take a look at the president’s last-minute plan to fund his border wall — and at how we got here. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Parkland Students, One Year Later
It’s been a year since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. We went to Florida this week to check in on some of the students we met 12 months ago. Guest: Clare Toeniskoetter, a producer for “The Daily,” spoke with four students who survived the shooting. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


No Heat, No Power: How a Federal Jail Failed Its Inmates
A New York Times investigation found that inside a Brooklyn jail, more than 1,000 inmates were locked inside freezing cells for 23 hours a day, prompting an inquiry by the Justice Department. But the involvement of the Justice Department may not be the turning point it appears to be.Guest: Annie Correal, who covers New York for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Chief Justice Roberts Just Protected Abortion Rights
From the moment he was confirmed, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has been a reliable conservative on the Supreme Court. So why did he just side with the court’s more liberal members to preserve abortion rights in Louisiana? Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Standoff Over Food and Power in Venezuela
The humanitarian crisis in Venezuela is worsening as President Nicolás Maduro refuses to give up power and blocks food from entering the country despite widespread hunger. Here’s a look at why, in Mr. Maduro’s mind, giving up control of food means giving up power. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Democrats Wanted Zero Tolerance for Misconduct. Then Came Virginia.
Democrats have adopted a policy of zero tolerance for misconduct, past or present, by members of their own party. The growing political crisis in Virginia is testing that approach. Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times, spoke with us from Richmond, Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Overlooked Scandal of Priests Sexually Abusing Nuns
The pope acknowledged for the first time the persistent problem of sexual abuse of nuns by priests. We look at why it took the Catholic Church so long to recognize this group of victims. Guest: Laurie Goodstein, who has covered the Catholic Church for decades. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What Past State of the Union Speeches Tell Us About the Future
In his first State of the Union address since losing control of Congress, the president repeatedly spoke of bipartisan unity. But a history of these speeches suggests that it’s everything else he said that will best predict how he actually governs. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


What Motivates Mitch McConnell?
Over the past decade, the Senate Republican leader has emerged as a skilled legislative warrior, obstructing President Barack Obama’s agenda and enabling President Trump’s. But what does Mitch McConnell himself actually believe in? Guest: Charles Homans, the politics editor for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Making Peace With the Taliban
Nearly 18 years ago, the United States declared war on the Taliban, promising to drive it from power in Afghanistan. Here’s a look at why American officials are now offering peace to the same group. Guest: Mujib Mashal, a New York Times senior correspondent in Afghanistan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The President and the Publisher
On Thursday in the Oval Office, the president of the United States debated the publisher of The New York Times about the role of a free press. Guest: A. G. Sulzberger, The Times’s publisher, sat down with President Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Perils of Reporting on an Investigation of the President
The special counsel’s office disputed an explosive BuzzFeed report claiming that President Trump had instructed his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, to lie to Congress — and that investigators had evidence of this. The scrutiny that followed calls to mind another reporting team and its challenges in the 1970s. Guests: Bob Woodward, one of the Washington Post reporters who broke the Watergate story, and Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more ...

How Democrats Will Govern (Now That Government Is Open)
For weeks, House Democrats have found their agenda overshadowed by the struggle to reopen the government. Now that it’s open, they have a plan. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Dispatches From the Border, Part 2
After a 35-day government shutdown over a proposed wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, Democrats and Republicans in Congress are negotiating over what border security actually means. We checked back in with Annie Brown from “The Daily,” who’s been driving the length of the border with the New York Times reporter Azam Ahmed. Their last dispatch focused on migrants in Mexico deciding whether to cross the border illegally. Now, we hear what can happen once they cross. Guests: Annie Brown, a producer for “The Da...


The Story of Roger Stone and WikiLeaks
The special counsel’s indictment of Roger J. Stone Jr. contains details as over-the-top as Mr. Stone himself, revealing, for instance, that he encouraged an associate to use a tactic straight from “The Godfather.” But the indictment — which shows the most direct link yet between the Trump campaign and WikiLeaks — is wholly serious. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

One Country, Two Presidents: The Crisis in Venezuela
A remarkable battle for power is playing out in Venezuela, with dueling claims to the presidency. We look at what’s happening in the country and why the situation is coming to a head. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

ISIS Has Lost Its Land. What About Its Power?
More than 99 percent of the territory the Islamic State once held in Iraq and Syria is gone — but the United States government may be misunderstanding what that means. Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism and the Islamic State for The New York Times, spoke with us from Iraq. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Confrontation at the Lincoln Memorial
Over the course of three days, the narrative of an encounter between young men wearing “Make America Great Again” hats and a Native American veteran has become a pick-your-side story where who holds power and who’s at fault are all up for debate. What can actually be said about what happened on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial? Guest: Elizabeth Dias, who covers faith and politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Freshmen: Rashida Tlaib, Part 1
Now that the Democrats have taken back the House, their plan is to govern on a message of unity heading into 2020. A small group of new, progressive lawmakers threatens to upend that plan. Meet one of them. Guests: Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan, and Andy Mills, a producer for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language....

A Rift Over Power and Privilege in the Women’s March
After the divisiveness of the 2016 election, the Women’s March became a major symbol of unity. But two years later, a rift in the movement has grown. Guest: Farah Stockman, a national reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Republican Congressman From Texas Who Opposes the Wall
As the government shutdown approaches its fifth week, a few congressional Republicans are publicly breaking from the president in his push for a border wall. We spoke with one of them. Guest: Representative Will Hurd, Republican of Texas. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

William Barr Under Oath
In a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, William P. Barr, the nominee for attorney general, vowed to protect the Justice Department and seemed to tell senators what they wanted to hear. But was it what the president wanted to hear? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Trump’s Pick for Attorney General
William P. Barr, President Trump’s nominee for attorney general, is set to go before senators today for the beginning of his confirmation hearings. What would it mean for the president and the special counsel to have an attorney general who is in charge of the Russia investigation? Guest: Katie Benner, who covers the Justice Department for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Dispatches From the Border, Part 1
As the shutdown continues over the president’s demand for a border wall, Annie Brown from “The Daily” joined Azam Ahmed, a New York Times reporter, and Meridith Kohut, a photojournalist, on their endeavor to drive the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border. Here’s what they saw on the first part of that journey. Guests: Annie Brown, a producer for “The Daily”; Azam Ahmed, the New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean; and Meridith Kohut, a photojournalist who covers Latin Am...

What a Border Sheriff Thinks About the Wall
A majority of Americans oppose the construction of a border wall. President Trump’s insistence on building it has led to a bitter political impasse and a government shutdown. We spoke with a sheriff on the border who supports the president’s efforts. Guest: Mark Napier, the sheriff of Pima County, Ariz. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Republicans’ Shutdown Strategy
In his latest negotiation with Democrats over the shutdown, President Trump slammed the table and stormed out of the meeting. We look at why his strategy requires giving no ground and forcing Republican senators to stand with him, no matter the cost. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Trump’s Prime-Time Address
Millions of Americans watched on Tuesday night as President Trump made his case for a wall on the southern border, and as Democratic leaders dismissed his talk of crisis. Guests: Michael M. Grynbaum, who covers the media for The New York Times, and Mark Landler, a White House correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Is There a Crisis at the Border?
President Trump plans to address the nation tonight about what he calls “the humanitarian and national security crisis on our southern border.” But much of that chaos could be a result of the administration’s policies. Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Trump’s Plan to Withdraw Troops From Syria
President Trump’s decision to withdraw American troops from Syria surprised allies and enemies alike, and prompted public disagreement from military and civilian leaders. But the ensuing debate about the role of the United States military may be long overdue.  Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Day 1 of a Democratic Majority
The 116th Congress has been sworn in. With that, Democrats have taken control of the House, and Representative Nancy Pelosi has reclaimed her position as its leader. Here’s the scene on Capitol Hill as the day unfolded. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Chuck Schumer on the Wall, the Shutdown and the Era of Divided Government
On the 12th day of the government shutdown, the Democratic congressional leaders went to the White House and proposed that the president reopen the government while the two sides ironed out differences on funding for a border wall. A couple of hours after that meeting, we spoke with Senator Chuck Schumer, the Senate minority leader, about his newly emboldened approach and how he and Ms. Pelosi plan to stick together in a divided Washington. Guest: Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Senate minority leade...

What Will Democrats Do With Their New Power?
Democrats have waited two years for a chance to investigate President Trump on their own terms. Starting tomorrow, they can. We look at how they plan to use — and not use — that power. Guest: Jason Zengerle, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


An Ongoing Look Into the Origins of Trump’s Wealth
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to a New York Times investigation into Fred and Donald Trump’s taxes. After spending much of the past year poring over never-before-seen documents, our colleagues unearthed new information about the president’s financial history that contradict his story of being a self-made billionaire. Guests: David Barstow, Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner, inves...

A Mother Talks to Her Sons About Brett Kavanaugh
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. In October, we sat down with a group of teenage girls in Brooklyn to talk about their reaction to the accusations against Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. After that conversation aired, we received dozens of emails from listeners who wanted to hear the same questions posed to a group of boys. Guests: Ann Powers, a listener in O...

The Scars of Family Separation
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we’re going back to an episode from this summer, when we met Nazario Jacinto Carrillo, a farmer from Guatemala who was separated from his daughter at the United States border as part of the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, spoke with Mr. Carrillo. For more i...


For a Family Divided by the Korean War, a New Chapter
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. In April, President Moon Jae-in of South Korea met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to discuss formally ending the Korean War, a conflict that has divided thousands of families for more than six decades. Sylvia Nam’s family is one of them. Guest: Sylvia Nam traveled to North Korea to find out what happened to her grandfather, who left South Korea for the North ...

The Year in Sound: An Audio Time Capsule of 2018
Between the government shutdowns that bookended the year, there were furious standoffs over a border wall; shootings at a high school, a bar, a grocery store, a synagogue; devastating wildfires in California. Handshakes and promises shared with autocrats in North Korea and Russia. Powerful men brought down by #MeToo or trying to make a comeback, and a Supreme Court nominee accused, then elevated to the bench. Questions about a murdered journalist, about election interference, about how much Facebook knew. A...

The Latest Showdown Over a Shutdown
President Trump seemed poised to avoid a government shutdown and to carry his fight for a border wall into 2019, when the House will be controlled by Democrats. Then he shot down the spending deal. So what happened? Also, to cap off a chaotic day of breaking news, Jim Mattis resigned as secretary of defense. Guest: Jonathan Weisman, the deputy Washington editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Senator Claire McCaskill on Losing Missouri and the Politics of Purity
If any Democratic senator representing a red state was going to survive the midterm elections and continue serving in 2019, it was thought to be Claire McCaskill. But she lost. We spoke with her as her time in office was winding down. Guests: Senator Claire McCaskill, Democrat of Missouri, and Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language....

The Ethics of Genetically Editing Babies
Ever since scientists created the powerful gene-editing technique Crispr, they have braced for the day when it would be used to produce a genetically altered human being. Now, the moment they feared may have come. What’s likely to happen next? We also look at the latest updates on a possible government shutdown. Guests: Jennifer Senior, an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, and Carl Zimmer, a science columnist for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. What do y...

A Year in the Russia Investigation
At the start of 2018, the biggest threat to the Trump presidency was an investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia. As the year draws to a close, it’s his hush payments to women. We look at what’s behind that change — and how the threat may change again next year. Guests: Mark Mazzetti and Michael S. Schmidt, New York Times reporters who have been covering the special counsel investigation. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


‘The Most Significant Campaign Contributions’ in U.S. History
It was never clear what motivated Rod J. Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general, to hand the investigation of Michael D. Cohen, President Trump’s former lawyer, over to career prosecutors in New York rather than to the special counsel. With that investigation now implicating the president in serious campaign finance violations, we look at how fateful the decision may be. Guests: Neal Katyal, a lawyer who drafted the rules that govern special counsel investigations, and Michael S. Schmidt, who has been cove...

Undocumented and Working for Trump
Last week, Victorina Morales came forward and said that for the last five years, she had been working as an undocumented immigrant at President Trump’s golf club in New Jersey. A couple of days ago, we visited her in her home with Miriam Jordan, the New York Times reporter who first broke the story. Guest: Victorina Morales, a former housekeeper at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., and Miriam Jordan, who covers immigration for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes...

The Rise of Right-Wing Extremism, and How U.S. Law Enforcement Ignored It
Despite repeated warnings over the past two decades, federal law enforcement officials in the United States have ignored the threat of violence from far-right extremists. Now, they have no idea how to stop it. Guest: Janet Reitman, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine who is working on a book about the rise of the far right in post-9/11 America. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Why Republicans Want a Criminal Justice Overhaul
President Barack Obama came very close in 2015 to passing a bipartisan bill to rewrite prison and sentencing laws. Three years later, the same people who were responsible for stopping that bill may become responsible for passing a scaled-back version. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Waiting for Brexit
In a humiliating last-minute move, Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain postponed a vote in Parliament on Tuesday on the terms of the country’s divorce from the European Union. We look at why Britain is so frustrated by Brexit even before Brexit has taken effect. Guests: Ellen Barry, the chief international correspondent for The New York Times, and Stephen Castle, a Times correspondent in London. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language....

The Business of Selling Your Location
A New York Times investigation has found that the information being collected about us through apps on our smartphones is far more extensive than most of us imagine — or are aware we have consented to. Guests: Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Natasha Singer and Michael H. Keller, reporters who cover technology for The Times; and Gabriel J.X. Dance, deputy investigations editor. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.A note about this episode: The Times identified a small number of pe...


The Photo of the Yemeni Girl
In the three years that Saudi Arabia, supported by the United States, has been at war with the Houthis in Yemen, very few journalists have been allowed into the country to document what’s happening there. The New York Times journalist Tyler Hicks is one. This is the story of how he came to take a photograph of Amal Hussain that drew international attention to the country’s plight. Guest: Tyler Hicks, a senior photographer for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Watering Down Democrats’ Power in Wisconsin
Across the country, Democratic candidates for governor and attorney general won seats that had long been held by Republicans. But Republican-controlled legislatures in some states are resisting that transfer of power. Guest: Mitch Smith, who covers the Midwest for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What the West Got Wrong About China, Part 2
When China first began experimenting with capitalism in the 1980s, the West was certain the experiment would fail. But two of its assumptions — that government controls stifle economic growth, and that the internet cannot be tamed — were quickly proven wrong.Nearly 40 years later, China rivals the United States as a global superpower. Its continued success is challenging not just the West’s assumptions about China, but the West’s assumptions about itself. Guest: Philip P. Pan, the Asia editor for The New Yo...


What the West Got Wrong About China, Part 1
From the very beginning, the West was certain that China would not pull off its economic experiment. That certainty came from a set of assumptions about how societies function and political freedoms emerge. But those assumptions were wrong — and China became stronger than ever. Guest: Philip P. Pan, the Asia editor for The New York Times, spoke with us from Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Legacy of George Bush
George Bush rode the Reagan revolution to the White House, where he had one of the highest approval ratings of any president, and where he successfully oversaw the end of the Cold War. So why was he denied a second term? Guest: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Michael Cohen Lied to Congress
President Trump’s former lawyer has pleaded guilty to lying about Mr. Trump’s business ties to Russia and has agreed to cooperate with the special counsel investigation. It’s the second time this week that a subject of the inquiry has been charged with lying. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Nancy Pelosi’s Last Fight
Many newly elected Democrats in the House have voted to make Representative Nancy Pelosi the next speaker. But that doesn’t necessarily mean she has their support. Guests: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times, and Representative-elect Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What’s Going On With Paul Manafort?
The special counsel’s office says that Paul Manafort, the president’s former campaign chairman, repeatedly lied to investigators, even after agreeing to cooperate in the Russia inquiry. Meanwhile, The Guardian is reporting that Mr. Manafort met with Julian Assange, the head of WikiLeaks, in 2016 — a meeting the special counsel seems to know nothing about. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit ...

The U.S. as a Place of Refuge
As large groups of Central American migrants approach the U.S. border, the Trump administration is making it more difficult for them to apply for asylum. Is the president undermining the original concept of asylum, or is he restoring it?  Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Human Toll of Instant Delivery
With the rise of online retailers like Amazon, consumers’ expectations about the speed of delivery have been transformed. A New York Times investigation examines the cost of that transformation. Guests: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, a business reporter for The Times; Tasha Murrell, a warehouse employee who shared her experience. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language....

Deployed in the U.S., Just Waiting for the Caravan
At nearly every turn, President Trump’s own generals tried to persuade him not to deploy active-duty troops to the United States border with Mexico. So what are 5,000 troops doing there? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why U.S. Bombs Are Falling in Yemen
The killing of Jamal Khashoggi has renewed criticism of Saudi Arabia more broadly, including the kingdom’s role in the war in Yemen. It’s a war that has created what has been called the worst humanitarian crisis in the world — and one that the United States has backed from the beginning. Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


How El Chapo Ended Up in a Brooklyn Courtroom
Nearly two years after being extradited from Mexico, Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the drug lord known as El Chapo, is finally facing trial in a United States court. Here’s why it took so long to get to this moment. Guest: Alan Feuer, who has been covering the trial for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What Facebook Knew and Tried to Hide
The story of Facebook in the past few years has been that of a company slow to understand how powerful it has become. But an investigation by The New York Times finds that once Facebook’s leaders understood the problems they faced, they sought to conceal them. Guests: Nicholas Confessore and Sheera Frenkel, two of the reporters behind the investigation. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

A Conversation With a Freshman Democrat
Last week, we looked at the campaign of a candidate who embodied the Democratic strategy for winning the House. This week, she arrived in Washington. We spoke with Abigail Spanberger, a recently elected congresswoman from Virginia, about her first days in the Capitol and what it means to be a Democrat today. Guest: Representative-elect Abigail Spanberger, Democrat of Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Plan to Discredit the Florida Recount
Republicans, seeking to secure the party’s majority and agenda in the Senate, are determined to delegitimize the statewide recount underway in Florida. We look at what Democrats have learned since the last time Republicans used that strategy. Guests: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times, and Jeremy W. Peters, who covers politics for The Times and is reporting on the recount from Tallahassee. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Diplomacy and Deception From North Korea
President Trump says the nuclear threat from North Korea is over. But new satellite images of hidden missile bases suggest that the situation has only worsened since his meeting with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The California Wildfires
One of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in California history is raging in the north of the state, as two others burn simultaneously in the south. Devastating wildfires have already become the new normal for the state. We look at why this feels different. Guest: Kirk Johnson, a New York Times correspondent who covers the American West and is reporting from Paradise, Calif. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language....


How the Democrats Flipped the House
In this year’s midterm elections, Democrats were battling for House seats in a range of districts. We look at how the party’s leaders came up with a winning strategy to use across vastly different places. Guest: Kate Zernike and Jonathan Martin, political reporters for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Trump Is Firing Sessions Now
After more than a year of mocking his attorney general, President Trump has forced Jeff Sessions to resign. The timing — only hours after the midterm elections — is not a coincidence. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What Happened in the Midterm Elections
The results are in: Democrats gained control of the House, even as Republicans strengthened their hold in the Senate. What does this mean for the next two years? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Field Guide to Today’s Elections
As the country heads to the polls, here are four themes and four races to watch. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

White, Evangelical and Worried About Trump
Two of the key groups that helped elect Donald J. Trump in 2016 were white women and evangelicals. Now, in the midterm elections, white women are turning away from the president and his party, while evangelicals are sticking with him. We look at what happens when you’re both. Guests: Annie Brown, a producer for “The Daily,” speaks with Tess Clarke, who tells us how evangelical Christianity informs her vote, and with Elizabeth Dias, who covers faith and politics for The New York Times. For more information o...

The Problem With Polls
Two years ago, news organizations including The New York Times were accused of having misled the country with voting projections. Here’s what we’re doing differently this time. Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


“I Am Not an Internet Troll”
A Russian news organization with ties to the 2016 election interference operation started a website called USAReally. Its stated purpose was for Americans to get uncensored news about their own country — from Russia. We spoke to the man behind it. Guest Host: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times, talks to Alexander Malkevich, the founder of USAReally, and David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/th...

The Business of Internet Outrage
At the height of its reach, the right-wing website Mad World News was getting millions of views. We talked to its founders about how they hit upon the formula that made it so successful — and why it suddenly stopped working. Guest Host: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times, reported this story for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Re-emergence of American Anti-Semitism
Until recently, many American Jews believed that anti-Semitism was a European problem, one the United States had left behind. But the attack in Pittsburgh did not come out of nowhere. Guest: Jonathan Weisman, the deputy Washington editor of The New York Times and author of “(((Semitism))): Being Jewish in America in the Age of Trump.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue
The massacre in Pittsburgh was one of the worst attacks against the Jewish community in the United States in decades. The city’s mayor called it “the darkest day of Pittsburgh’s history.” Guests: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times, and Campbell Robertson, a national correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Voters Both Parties Are Ignoring
Nearly 30 million Latinos in the United States are eligible to vote, representing almost 13 percent of the American electorate. Why is so little attention being paid to them in the midterm elections? Guest: Jose A. Del Real, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

How 1994 Gave Us Today’s Politics
To understand the divisions that define this year’s midterm elections, you have to go back to the midterm elections of 1994. We look at the moment when exploiting differences of opinion became a winning political strategy. Guests: Jennifer Senior, an Opinion columnist for The New York Times, speaks to Vin Weber, a former Republican congressman from Minnesota. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Migrant Caravan and the Midterms
Thousands of Central American migrants are moving north through Mexico, heading for the U.S. border. Republicans won’t stop talking about it, and Democrats are trying not to. Guest: Annie Correal, a New York Times reporter who spoke to us from Huixtla, Mexico. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Why Trump Can’t Quit Mohammed bin Salman
From the moment he was named the country’s day-to-day leader, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia has disappointed the United States over and over again. Yet the Trump White House hasn’t let go of him. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Who’s Allowed to Vote in Georgia?
One candidate made a name for herself trying to register voters. Another rose to prominence trying to purge them from the rolls. We look at how one of the most closely watched governor’s races in the country became a battle over whose vote counts. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A New Climate Tipping Point
Last week, a long-awaited report showed that the worst consequences of global warming would occur even sooner than previously thought. Here’s the story behind the findings. Guests: Coral Davenport, who covers energy and the environment for The New York Times, and William D. Nordhaus, who was awarded a Nobel this year for his work on the economics of climate change. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Letting Louis C.K. Back Onstage
Nine months after admitting to sexual misconduct with multiple women, Louis C.K. dropped into a New York City comedy club unannounced and tried to make a comeback. And then he returned, again and again. We talk to the club owner who gave him that stage. Guest: Noam Dworman, the owner of the Comedy Cellar. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Battle for Missouri, Part 2: The Moderate
When Democrats lost almost every race in Missouri in 2016, their party decided it needed to do something drastic. But the path they chose may have created an entirely new problem. Guest: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent who reported this story for The New York Times and “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Battle for Missouri, Part 1: The Anti-Abortion Democrat
Weeks before the midterm elections, moderate and progressive Democrats in Missouri are grappling with what the party stands for and who gets to define it. What happens will determine the fate of one of the most endangered Democratic senators in the country. Guest Host: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent who reported this story for The New York Times and “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The State of the Midterms (and the Country)
As the Democrats fight to reclaim control of Congress, the House seems to be headed in one direction, the Senate in the other. With three weeks to go until Election Day, we look at the state of the 2018 midterms. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Police Shooting That Rocked Chicago
On the night of Oct. 20, 2014, a white police officer shot a black teenager 16 times. It took nearly four years for the case to make it to trial. It took less than eight hours for the jury to reach a verdict. Guest: Monica Davey, the Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Disappearance of a Saudi Journalist
Saudi Arabia’s crown prince has promoted himself to the West as a reformer determined to create a more free and open society. That image is unraveling as a prominent Saudi journalist and dissident remains missing. Guest: Carlotta Gall, the Istanbul bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Who Is Believed and Who Is Blamed?
Across the country, the confirmation of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh has set off a highly personal debate among women about credibility and culpability. We sit in on two of those conversations. Guests: A group of teenagers in Brooklyn, who shared with us their reactions to the accusations against Justice Kavanaugh; and the reporters Susan Chira and Ellen Ann Fentress, who spoke to Lovetta Green and Crystal Walls, two friends in Mississippi with very different political views. For more information on today’s e...

The Dilemma for Red-State Democrats
Democratic senators in states that President Trump won had concluded that their best path to re-election was to campaign on local issues. Then came the confirmation fight over Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh. Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Supreme Court With Justice Kavanaugh
Judge Kavanaugh is now Justice Kavanaugh. We look at what the last few weeks mean for the future of the Supreme Court. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

What the F.B.I. Found (and Didn’t Find)
The agency has delivered its report on Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Senate. Republicans say it reveals nothing new — but Democrats say it was specifically designed to reveal nothing new. Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The F.B.I.’s Kavanaugh Investigation
As the F.B.I. shares the results of its investigation into Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh with the Senate, we look at what the scope of the inquiry may mean for his confirmation vote — and why Republicans are changing the way they talk about his accuser. Guests: Michael D. Shear and Peter Baker, who both cover the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


How Trump Really Got Rich
President Trump has long sold himself as a self-made billionaire. But after spending a year studying tens of thousands of pages of confidential records, our New York Times colleagues uncovered new details about the president’s financial history. Here’s what they found....

Kavanaugh’s Classmates Speak Out
The F.B.I. investigation into Judge Brett Kavanaugh is underway. More of his former classmates are now coming forward with personal stories — but it’s unclear whether the inquiry will take those stories into account. Guests: Kate Kelly, a New York Times reporter who attended an all-girls private high school in Washington, and Robin Pogrebin, a Times reporter who was Judge Kavanaugh’s classmate at Yale. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Anguish of Jeff Flake
Senator Jeff Flake’s last-minute demand for an F.B.I. investigation into Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh has single-handedly held up the confirmation vote for the Supreme Court nominee. Here’s the story behind that decision. Guest: Michael D. Shear, who covers the White House for The New York Times, and Ana Maria Archila, one of the protesters who spoke to Mr. Flake on his way to the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on Friday. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Blasey-Kavanaugh Hearing
She gave a raw, reluctant account of sexual assault. He gave an angry, outraged denial. And once again, the United States Senate must take a side. Guest: Kate Zernike, who covers politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Today’s Hearing: Trial or Job Interview?
The Senate Judiciary Committee opens its hearing into allegations against Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh today. At stake for both parties is the swing seat on an ideologically divided Supreme Court in the thick of an election battle for control of Congress. Here’s a preview of each side’s plan for the hearing. Guests: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times, and Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Revisiting What Happened to Anita Hill
Twenty-seven years ago, the Senate Judiciary Committee questioned Anita F. Hill, a law professor, and Judge Clarence Thomas, the Supreme Court nominee she accused of sexual harassment. We look at how those events are shaping the confirmation hearings for Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh. Guest: Kate Zernike, who covers politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Conservative Divide Over Kavanaugh
Conservatives have been deeply split about how to respond to allegations of sexual assault against Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh. That’s now starting to change. Guest: Ross Douthat, an Opinion columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Rod Rosenstein’s Insurrection
Days after being named deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein was so alarmed by what he was seeing inside the White House that he proposed a series of extreme measures. Will those proposals now cost him his job? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

10 Years After the Financial Crisis
A decade ago, U.S. policymakers hatched a plan to rescue a financial system in free fall. Their solution solved that crisis — but deepened another. Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A High School Assault
The accusation against Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh has set off a national debate about how to address decades-old allegations of sexual aggression by a teenager. Here is one woman’s perspective. Guest: Caitlin Flanagan, who wrote about her experience of sexual assault in The Atlantic. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault....

Will Dr. Blasey Testify?
Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of sexual assault, has said she wants the F.B.I. to investigate her claims. We look at what that means for the Supreme Court confirmation process. Guest: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Accusation Against Brett Kavanaugh
Days before Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh was expected to receive a lifetime appointment to the country’s highest court, a woman has come forward with allegations that could derail his confirmation. He denies the claims, and both are now scheduled to testify. Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A Dispatch From the Center of the Storm
North Carolina is facing a statewide crisis as the storm known as Florence slowly ravages the South, flooding cities, sending thousands into shelters and endangering communities from the coast to the mountains. Here’s what’s happening in one of those communities. Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent for The New York Times who has been covering the storm from North Carolina. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Lost in the Storm, Part 2
Even as floodwaters caused by Hurricane Harvey began to recede, Wayne Dailey was pleading with emergency services to send someone to rescue his wife. Guests: Annie Brown, a producer for The Daily, speaks with Wayne Dailey, who sought urgent medical care for his wife during Hurricane Harvey, and Sheri Fink, who reported this story for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Lost in the Storm, Part 1
One year ago, Houston thought it was prepared for Hurricane Harvey. As another major hurricane approaches the U.S., we look at how flooding overwhelmed Houston’s emergency systems, and how one family found out that they were on their own. Guests: Annie Brown, a producer for The Daily, speaks with Wayne Dailey, who sought urgent medical care for his wife during Hurricane Harvey, and Sheri Fink, who reported this story for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com...


The Spy Who Provoked Putin
The attack was brazen and exotic, but the target was a low-level former spy. Why did Russia risk so much in the Sergei Skripal case? Guest: Michael Schwirtz, an investigative reporter for The New York Times who recently returned from covering this story in Moscow. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Bob Woodward on Trump, Nixon and Anonymity
Bob Woodward’s reporting on the Nixon administration pioneered an approach to journalism that drew from anonymous sources and has been widely used since. He has deployed that form of reporting in his new book to tell the story of the Trump administration. Guests: Mr. Woodward, author of “Fear: Trump in the White House,” speaks with Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

An Interview With George Papadopoulos
George Papadopoulos, a former campaign aide to President Trump, was sentenced on Friday for deceiving the F.B.I. about his relationship with a person thought to be a Russian operative who had offered to arrange a meeting between Mr. Trump and the Russian president, Vladimir V. Putin. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington correspondent for The Times, who spoke with Mr. Papadopoulos before his sentencing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


The Kavanaugh Documents
All week, Senate Democrats have furiously protested the decision by Republicans to protect thousands of documents related to Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court. On the third day of his confirmation hearings, that fury came to a head. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Anonymous Senior Administration Official
The New York Times published an account by an unnamed member of the Trump administration about resistance figures operating inside the government. “I would know,” the official wrote. “I am one of them.” Guest: James Dao, Op-Ed editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

A Chaotic Opening Day for Brett Kavanaugh
On the first day of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings, battle lines were drawn around the issues of abortion, the withholding of documents and executive power. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


A 30-Year Plan to Transform the Courts
Republicans have created a pipeline of conservative lawyers to help carry out a sweeping reconfiguration of the federal judiciary. Guest: Jason Zengerle, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

When We Almost Stopped Climate Change
Thirty years ago, the United States had a chance to stop global warming in its tracks. Almost nothing stood in the way — except human resistance. Guests: Rafe Pomerance, an environmentalist who became involved with the climate movement in its earliest days; Nathaniel Rich, who reported on the history of climate politics for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

An Unexpected Upset in Florida
The Florida governor’s race was supposed to come down to a predictable face-off between the establishment Republican and the establishment Democrat. That’s not what happened. Guest: Patricia Mazzei, Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


An Execution in Nebraska
After a 40-year crusade, a state lawmaker succeeded in getting Nebraska to ban the death penalty in 2015. Why, then, did the state execute a prisoner this month? Guests: Nebraska State Senator Ernie Chambers, a longtime opponent of the death penalty, and Mitch Smith, a national reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The War Inside the Catholic Church
An archbishop has accused Pope Francis of being part of the effort to cover up a sex abuse scandal. What does it mean that the accusation is coming from inside the Roman Catholic Church? Guest: Jason Horowitz, the Rome bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

The Paradoxes of John McCain
Senator John McCain was proud of his reputation as a maverick in American politics. Through pivotal moments in his life — as a prisoner of war, a young congressman, a presidential candidate, and, ultimately, an elder statesman — that reputation was both validated and challenged. Guests: Elisabeth Bumiller, the Washington bureau chief for The New York Times; Carl Hulse, The Times’s chief Washington correspondent; Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The Times; and Scott Shane, who writes about nation...


Special Episode: The Last “Year of the Woman”
More women are running for office in the 2018 midterm elections than in any other election in American history. “The Daily” speaks to Senator Dianne Feinstein about what this moment shares with 1992, another record-breaking “Year of the Woman.” Guests: Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, and Kate Zernike, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

“Divided,” Part 2: The Chaos of Reunification
More than 2,000 children were separated from their parents at the border. After a judge ordered the U.S. government to promptly reunite the families, the government claimed it would be nearly impossible to do so. In Part 2 of our series, we look at why the government could separate families, but not bring them back together. Guest hosts: Annie Correal, who covers New York City for The New York Times, and Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit ...

The Man Who Wrote Mueller’s Rules
The special counsel, Robert Mueller, has followed a set of rules devised to allow for the investigation of a sitting president. Those rules will now be tested. Guests: Neal Katyal, who drafted the regulations that govern Mr. Mueller’s investigation, and Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Implicating the President
Michael Cohen, President Trump’s former personal lawyer, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to campaign finance violations — and said Mr. Trump himself had ordered the crimes. Minutes later, Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, was convicted of financial fraud in the first trial resulting from the special counsel’s investigation. Guest: Joseph Kahn, the managing editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

“Divided,” Part 1: How Family Separations Started
The policy began in secret. The Trump administration denied such a policy existed. And when it finally acknowledged that migrant children were being separated from their parents at the border, chaos ensued. Only now is the full picture of what happened and why becoming clear. Guest hosts: Annie Correal, who covers New York City for The New York Times, and Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

Robert Mueller’s Unlikely Witness
The New York Times has found that one of the White House’s own lawyers, Don McGahn, has cooperated extensively in the investigation led by the special counsel, Robert Mueller. And he has shared far more information than the president thought. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, one of the reporters who broke the story. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Nancy Pelosi’s Dilemma
Republicans in this year’s elections are casting one person as the symbol of everything that is wrong with the Democratic Party. Many Democrats are also turning on the same figure. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....

A Culture of Secrecy That Perpetuated Abuse
A grand jury report found that Roman Catholic priests had abused more than 1,000 children in Pennsylvania over a period of 70 years. Some church officials say the report reiterates issues that have already been addressed, but details suggest otherwise. Guest: Laurie Goodstein, a national religion correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode contains descriptions of abuse....

The Economic Cost of Authoritarian Rule
Turkey is on the verge of an economic meltdown that could infect the global financial system. We examine how the country’s slide toward authoritarianism helped trigger the crisis. Guest: Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....


Unearthing the Truth in Myanmar
The country is accused of waging a state-sponsored campaign of massacre, rape and arson against Rohingya Muslims. Why, then, did the government allow a New York Times journalist to tour the epicenter of the reported atrocities? Guest: Hannah Beech, the Southeast Asia bureau chief of The New York Times, who recently visited Rakhine State, where many Rohingya Muslims once lived. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily....