The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads Podcast

The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

'I just needed to find my family': the scandal of Chile's stolen children – podcast
At two months old, Maria Diemar was flown to Sweden to be adopted. Years later, she tracked down her birth mother, who said her baby had been taken against her will. Now investigations are showing that she was one of thousands stolen from their parents. By Aaron Nelsen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Chile Adoption AugustoPinochet

From the archive: 'A reckoning for our species': the philosopher prophet of the Anthropocene
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Timothy Morton wants humanity to give up some of its core beliefs, from the fantasy that we can control the planet to the notion that we are ‘above’ other beings. His ideas might sound weird, but they’re catching on. By Alex Blasdel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Animals Environment Music Philosophybooks Climatechange Philosophy


Penthouses and poor doors: how Europe's 'biggest regeneration project' fell flat
Few places have seen such turbocharged luxury development as Nine Elms on the London riverside. So why are prices tumbling, investors melting away and promises turning to dust? By Oliver Wainwright. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Housingmarket Architecture Property London Constructionindustry

From the archives: The race to build the world’s first sex robot
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: The $30bn sex tech industry is about to unveil its biggest blockbuster: a $15,000 robot companion that talks, learns, and never says no. By Jenny Kleeman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Sex Robots Sexuality Technology

‘A managerial Mephistopheles’: inside the mind of Jeff Bezos
The Amazon founder’s relentless quest for ‘customer ecstasy’ made him one of the world’s richest people – now he’s looking to the unlimited resources of space. Is he the genius our age of consumerism deserves? By Mark O’Connell. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Amazon JeffBridges Business Space Technology E-commerce


One drug dealer, two corrupt cops and a risky FBI sting
Davon Mayer was a smalltime dealer in west Baltimore who made an illicit deal with local police. When they turned on him, he decided to get out – but escaping that life would not prove as easy as falling into it. By Yudhijit Bhattacharjee. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

USpolicing Society Drugs Baltimore USnews FBI Podcasts Drugstrade Worldnews

From the archive: PPE: the Oxford degree that runs Britain
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: Oxford University graduates in philosophy, politics and economics make up an astonishing proportion of Britain’s elite. But has it produced an out-of-touch ruling class? By Andy Beckett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Education Universities Politics Philosophy Economics Highereducation

How the long fight for slavery reparations is slowly being won
In a suburb of Chicago, the world’s first government-funded slavery reparations programme is beginning. Robin Rue Simmons helped make it happen – but her victory has been more than 200 years in the making. By Kris Manjapra. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Slavery Africa Race USnews Podcasts


'Our souls are dead': how I survived a Chinese 're-education' camp for Uighurs
After 10 years living in France, I returned to China to sign some papers and I was locked up. For the next two years, I was systematically dehumanised, humiliated and brainwashed. By Gulbahar Haitiwaji with Rozenn Morgat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Uighurs Podcasts AsiaPacific China Xinjiang Islam XiJinping

From the archives: The booming business of nation branding
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: These days, every place in the world wants to market its unique identity – and an industry has sprung up to help put them on the map. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Marketing&PR Mexico Russia Paraguay Travel&leisure

The ungrateful refugee: ‘We have no debt to repay’
Dina Nayeri was just a child when she fled Iran as an asylum seeker. But as she settled into life in the US and then Europe, she became suspicious of the idea that refugees should shed their old identities and be eternally thankful. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Refugees Iran MiddleEastandNorthAfrica Migration USnews Podcasts


The joys of being an absolute beginner ... for life
The phrase ‘adult beginner’ can sound patronising. It implies you are learning something you should have mastered as a child. But learning is not just for the young. By Tom Vanderbilt. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Education Hobbies Chess Boardgames Lifeandstyle Parentsandparenting

From the archive: Why did two parents murder their adopted child?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: Asunta Fong Yang was adopted as a baby by a wealthy Spanish couple. Aged 12, she was found dead beside a country road. Not long after, her mother and father were arrested. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Spain Adoption Children Europe Worldnews

How Julia Donaldson conquered the world, one rhyme at a time
She published her first book in her 40s and became the biggest selling author of the past decade in any genre – The Gruffalo alone has sold 13m copies. How did this former busker make it so big? By Oliver Franklin-Wallis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

JuliaDonaldson Books Children'sbooks:7andunder


Super cubes: inside the (surprisingly) big business of packaged ice
Britain’s leading ice company makes five billion cubes a year, filling everything from cocktail glasses to ice baths. Now it faces its toughest challenge – for what is ice without a party season? By George Reynolds. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Food Cocktails Spirits Food&drinkindustry Business UKnews

From the archive: Killer, kleptocrat, genius, spy: the many myths of Vladimir Putin
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Russia’s role in Trump’s election has led to a boom in Putinology. But do all these theories say more about us than Putin?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Russia Europe VladimirPutin Worldnews

Trump's defeat and the death throes of the Civil War
How Republicans applied old school racism to new demographics, and lost. By Gary Younge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

USvotingrights Race Americancivilwar Civilrightsmovement USelections2020 USnews USpolitics Worldnews DonaldTrump JoeBiden


'Singing and dancing to their deaths': football’s forgotten tragedy
In 1971, an Old Firm derby at Ibrox ended with the death of 66 fans as they celebrated a late goal. John Hodgman survived the terrifying crush and, 50 years on, asks how Rangers avoided taking responsibility. By John Hodgman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Football Scotland Hillsboroughdisaster Celtic Rangers Sport

From the archives: Total recall: the people who never forget
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Memory Science

The curse of 'white oil': electric vehicles' dirty secret
The race is on to find a steady source of lithium, a key component in rechargeable electric car batteries. But while the EU focuses on emissions, the lithium gold rush threatens environmental damage on an industrial scale. By Oliver Balch.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Environment Mining Renewableenergy Portugal Chile Electric hybridandlow-emissioncars Energy


From the archives: Why we fell for clean eating
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The oh-so-Instagrammable food movement has been thoroughly debunked – but it shows no signs of going away. The real question is why we were so desperate to believe it. By Bee Wilson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Dietsanddieting Foodscience Health&wellbeing Food&drinkindustry Food

How to be entitled: can Debrett’s help outsiders join Britain’s elite?
The faithful chronicler of the aristocracy for 250 years is reinventing itself as an engine for social mobility, offering courses in manners and getting your foot in the door. Is this just snobbery rebranded? By Aida Edemariam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Classissues Socialmobility Society Inequality Aristocracy Lifeandstyle NancyMitford


A Christmas message – audio long reads
Merry Christmas! We hope you’re having a good one. We are taking a short break but will be back on 4th January 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

From the archives: Fifa: the video game that changed football
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Fifa belongs to a select group of titles familiar to people who have no interest in gaming – or even real football. What’s the secret of its success? By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Technology Gameculture Sport Football

The mystery of the Gatwick drone
A drone sighting caused the airport to close for two days in 2018, but despite a lengthy police investigation, no culprit was ever found. So what exactly did people see in the Sussex sky? By Samira Shackle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Gatwickairport Drones(non-military) Drones(military)


'A peculiarly English epic': the weird genius of The Archers
Strangely eventless, yet swelling with high drama, The Archers is the longest-running series in the world. But has this rural soap been teaching Middle England about itself, or inventing it from scratch? By Charlotte Higgins. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

TheArchers Radio Culture Television&radio Podcasts

From the archive: Why time management is ruining our lives
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2016: All of our efforts to be more productive backfire – and only make us feel even busier and more stressed. By Oliver Burkeman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Timemanagement Technology Health&wellbeing Lifeandstyle

'Is anybody in there?' Life on the inside as a locked-in patient
Jake Haendel spent months trapped in his body, silent and unmoving but fully conscious. Most people never emerge from ‘locked-in syndrome’, but as a doctor told him, everything about his case is bizarre by Josh Wilbur. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Deathanddying Science Medicalresearch Health Coronavirus


From the archives: How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The ability of statistics to accurately represent the world is declining. In its wake, a new age of big data controlled by private companies is taking over – and putting democracy in peril. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Smartphones Technology Politics UKnews Governmentdata OfficeforNationalStatistics

The ‘false positives’ scandal that felled Colombia’s military hero
When the Colombian army defeated the Farc guerrillas, ending decades of conflict, General Mario Montoya was hailed a national hero. But then it was revealed that thousands of ‘insurgents’ executed by the army were in fact innocent men. By Mariana Palau. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Colombia Farc Americas

Life during wartime: how west Belfast became the frontline of the Troubles
Acts of state violence, and repeated official denials, drove some Northern Irish Catholics to armed resistance. But not everyone in west Belfast supported the IRA’s methods. By Ian Cobain. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Belfast NorthernIreland IRA UKsecurityandcounter-terrorism


From the archive: The inside story of Facebook’s biggest setback
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The social network had a grand plan to connect millions of Indians to the internet. Here’s how it all went wrong. By Rahul Bhatia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Facebook Technology MarkZuckerberg India Socialnetworking Media Worldnews

'Try again next time': my three visa rejections
After being offered a prestigious international literary residency, Nkiacha Atemnkeng was excited for his first visit to the US – until he turned up at the embassy for his interview. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Cameroon Worldnews Africa Trumptravelban Migration Books Literaryfestivals

The contested legacy of the anti-fascist International Brigades
In the 1930s, thousands of men and women around the world enlisted to fight fascism in Spain. Many survivors went on to play a key role in the fight against the Nazis – but, in some cases, later became powerful servants of brutal regimes. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Mexico Spain GeorgeOrwell


From the archive: Political correctness and how the right invented a phantom enemy
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: For 25 years, invoking this vague and ever-shifting nemesis has been a favourite tactic of the right – and Donald Trump’s victory is its greatest triumph. By Moira Weigel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

DonaldTrump USnews Worldnews USpolitics Universities

China’s memory manipulators
The country’s rulers do not just suppress history, they recreate it to serve the present. They know that, in a communist state, change often starts when the past is challenged. By Ian Johnson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

China AsiaPacific


From the archives: An American drugs bust in west Africa
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Using undercover agents, the DEA spent four years trying to bring down a cocaine trafficking gang in Liberia. Was the operation a triumph in the global war on drugs or a case of American overreach? By Yudhijit Bhattacharjee. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Drugs Africa Liberia Worldnews

Behind China’s ‘pork miracle’: how technology is transforming rural hog farming
As Chinese demand for pork grows and grows, traditional small-scale farms are being replaced by vast, AI-assisted operations that feel more like smartphone factories than bucolic countryside havens. By Xiaowei Wang. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Agriculture Farming Foodscience Foodsafety Animals Meat Technology Meatindustry

How Syria's disinformation wars destroyed the co-founder of the White Helmets
In November 2019, James Le Mesurier, the British co-founder of the Syrian rescue group, fell to his death in Istanbul. What led an internationally celebrated humanitarian to take his own life? By Martin Chulov. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Syria Warreporting Turkey Russia Worldnews


From the archive: The hygge conspiracy
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: This year’s most overhyped trend is a wholesome Danish concept of cosiness, used to sell everything from fluffy socks to vegan shepherd’s pie. But the version we’re buying is a British invention – and the real thing is less cuddly than it seems. By Charlotte Higgins. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Denmark Lifeandstyle Worldnews

Facts v feelings: how to stop our emotions misleading us
The pandemic has shown how a lack of solid statistics can be dangerous. But even with the firmest of evidence, we often end up ignoring the facts we don’t like. By Tim Harford. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Psychology Coronavirus Science Science UKnews

How maverick rewilders are trying to turn back the tide of extinction
A handful of radical nature lovers are secretly breeding endangered species and releasing them into the wild. Many are prepared to break the law and risk the fury of the scientific establishment to save the animals they love. By Patrick Barkham. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Wildlife Conservation Insects Butterflies Podcasting Animals Environment


From the archives: The fall of Jersey: how a tax haven goes bust
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Jersey bet its future on finance but since 2007 it has fallen on hard times and is heading for bankruptcy. Is the island’s perilous present Britain’s bleak future?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Taxavoidance ChannelIslands Jersey

The fatal hike that became a Nazi propaganda coup
In 1936, a school group from south London went on a hike in the Black Forest. Despite the heroic rescue attempts of German villagers, five boys died. Eighty years on, locals are still asking how it happened. By Kate Connolly. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Nazism Germany Europe Worldnews

‘Machines set loose to slaughter’: the dangerous rise of military AI
Autonomous machines capable of deadly force are increasingly prevalent in modern warfare, despite numerous ethical concerns. Is there anything we can do to halt the advance of the killer robots? By Frank Pasquale. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Artificialintelligence(AI) Technology Robots Warcrimes Military Armstrade


From the archives: The lawyer who takes the cases no one wants
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: It has never been easy to win as an immigration lawyer – but now the government is trying to make it impossible. By Aida Edemariam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Immigrationandasylum Law Legalaid Migration

Confessions of a killer policeman
In a state bloodied by decades of armed rebellion, Thounaojam Herojit became one of India’s most deadly police officers – killing more than a hundred people. Then, he became something rarer still: an executioner who wanted to tell the world about his crimes. By Raghu Karnad and Grace Jajo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

India Police Worldnews

Inside the airline industry's meltdown
Coronavirus has hit few sectors harder than air travel, wiping out tens of thousands of jobs and uncountable billions in revenue. While most fleets were grounded, the industry was forced to reimagine its future. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Airtransport Airlineindustry VirginAtlantic Boeing BritishAirways Flybe AirFrance/KLM Coronavirus Business Travel&leisure Travel


From the archives: The prison where murderers play for Manchester United
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Luzira was once the most notorious prison in Uganda. Now it’s home to what is surely the world’s most elaborate prison football league – and a model for the transformative power of the beautiful game. By David Goldblatt. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Football Africa ManchesterUnited


From the archives: Time, gentlemen: when will the last all-male clubs admit women?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: The Garrick Club in London is preparing for a bitter struggle over whether to admit women members. How long can the British establishment fend off modernity? By Amelia Gentleman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

UKnews Gender

How rescuing drowning migrants became a crime
The Iuventa ran hundreds of missions to save migrants from drowning off the coast of Libya. But after Europe cracked down on migration, its crew found themselves facing prosecution. By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Migration Refugees Libya Italy EuropeanUnion MatteoSalvini FiveStarMovement TheLeague

'I don't want to be seen as a zealot': what MPs really think about the climate crisis
In return for anonymity, MPs agreed to speak candidly about climate change. The difference between what they say in private and in public is striking – and shows us how we can make climate action central to post-pandemic politics. By Rebecca Willis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Climatechange Environment Politics Climatechange


From the archives: The simple idea that could transform US criminal justice
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Judge Victoria Pratt looks defendants in the eye, asks them to write essays about their goals, and applauds them for complying – and she is getting results. By Tina Rosenberg. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

USjusticesystem

The battle over dyslexia
It was once a widely accepted way of explaining why some children struggled to read and write. But in recent years, some experts have begun to question the existence of dyslexia itself. By Sirin Kale. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Dyslexia Education Children Schools Specialeducationalneeds

Fashion's dirty secret: how sexual assault took hold in jeans factories
After revelations of sexual violence in Lesotho garment factories, where jeans are made for brands such as Levi’s, workers fought for better conditions. But now Covid-19 has hit the fashion industry, those gains may be lost. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Sexualviolence Africa Humanrights Lesotho Garmentworkers


From the archives: The sugar conspiracy
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long? By Ian Leslie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Health Sugar Nutrition Nutrition Dietsanddieting Healthpolicy

How philanthropy benefits the super-rich
There are more philanthropists than ever before. Each year they give tens of billions to charitable causes. So how come inequality keeps rising?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

BillGates WarrenBuffett Kochbrothers Philanthropy

The butcher's shop that lasted 300 years (give or take)
Frank Fisher, now 90, was a traditional high street butcher his whole working life – as were three generations of his family before him. How does a man dedicated to serving his community decide when it’s time to hang up his white coat? By Tom Lamont. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Meat Coronavirus Shopsandshopping


From the archives: How Boots went rogue
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Britain’s biggest pharmacy used to be a family business, dedicated to serving society. Now, many of the company’s own staff believe that its relentless drive for profit is putting the public at risk. By Aditya Chakrabortty. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Healthcareindustry Pharmaceuticalsindustry Business Health NHS

Life after deportation: 'No one tells you how lonely you're going to be'
The Windrush scandal brought the cruelty of Britain’s deportation policies to light, but the practice continues to this day – and shockingly, it is made possible by UK aid money. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Jamaica Windrushscandal Prisonsandprobation UKcriminaljustice Commonwealthimmigration

Operation Condor: the cold war conspiracy that terrorised South America
During the 1970s and 80s, eight US-backed military dictatorships jointly plotted the cross-border kidnap, torture, rape and murder of hundreds of their political opponents. Now some of the perpetrators are finally facing justice. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Espionage Uruguay Argentina AugustoPinochet


From the archives: Tudormania: Why can’t we get over it?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Our fixation with the sexy powerplays of the Tudor court shows no signs of fading. What is it about this 16th-century dynasty that still obsesses us? By Charlotte Higgins. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

History Historicaldrama(TV) WolfHall WolfHall HilaryMantel Historybooks HamptonCourtPalace

Escape: the woman who brought her trafficker to justice
Thousands of young women leave home in Nigeria every year on the promise of a good job in Europe, only to be trapped by debt and forced into prostitution. But one joined forces with investigators in Italy to expose the traffickers. By Ottavia Spaggiari. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Podcasts Italy Nigeria Humantrafficking Sexualviolence Prostitution

Love you to death: how we hurt the animals we cherish
Something has gone badly wrong with the way we keep pets. Our casual cruelties are a symptom of our unhealthy relationship with other species. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Animals Pets Dogs Cats Animalwelfare Dangerousdogs


From the archives: The fortune-teller of Kabul
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: For centuries mystics have channelled the hopes and fears of Afghans. With the nation in turmoil, their services are as popular as ever. But can they survive the latest crackdown by religious hardliners?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Society Afghanistan

The tyranny of chairs: why we need better design
Most chairs aren’t designed to serve human bodies – but a better seat is possible. By Sara Hendren. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Design Disability Podcasts Health Health&wellbeing

America's 'untouchables': the silent power of the caste system
We cannot fully understand the current upheavals, or almost any turning point in American history, without accounting for the human pyramid that is encrypted into us all: the caste system. By Isabel Wilkerson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Race Civilrightsmovement India MartinLutherKing


From the archives: The birth of Rhodes Must Fall
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: When a black South African student threw a bucket of excrement over a statue of Cecil Rhodes, it kicked off a protest movement that is shattering the way the country sees its past. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

SouthAfrica Studentpolitics Africa Race

Decolonising dermatology: why black and brown skin need better treatment
During my medical training, it was almost always assumed that my patients would be white. That prejudice is harmful in its own right – and when it comes to dangerous skin conditions, it can be deadly. By Neil Singh. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Medicine Skincare Skincancer Race Health&wellbeing

The business of kidnapping: inside the secret world of hostage negotiation
Official policy in the UK and US – unlike in many other countries – is to never make concessions to kidnappers. Those taken sometimes die as a result. Is it time to rethink? By Joel Simon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Americas Business Worldnews Colombia Crime Insuranceindustry


From the archives: The art of sound in movies
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Skip Lievsay has created audioscapes for Martin Scorsese and is the only sound man the Coen brothers go to. But the key to this work is more than clever effects, it is understanding the human mind. By Jordan Kisner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Film

The last of the Zoroastrians
A funeral, a family, and a journey into a disappearing religion. By Shaun Walker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

India Religion Society Family

The evolution of Extinction Rebellion
In its first year of existence, XR transformed the global conversation around the climate crisis. But then it was gripped by internal conflicts about its next steps. Can the movement reinvent itself for the post-pandemic world? By Matthew Taylor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

ExtinctionRebellion Climatechange Climatechange Environment Protest


From the archives: Who killed the 20th century’s greatest spy?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: When Ashraf Marwan fell to his death from the balcony of a London flat, he took his secrets with him. Was he working for Egypt or Israel? And did the revelation of his identity lead to his murder? By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Espionage

From the archives: Who killed the 20th century’s greatest spy?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: When Ashraf Marwan fell to his death from the balcony of a London flat, he took his secrets with him. Was he working for Egypt or Israel? And did the revelation of his identity lead to his murder? By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Espionage


From the archives: Why can’t the world’s greatest minds solve the mystery of consciousness?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors.This week, from 2015: philosophers and scientists have been at war for decades over the question of what makes human beings more than complex robots. By Oliver Burkeman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Consciousness


From the archives – Ceausescu’s children: life in a Romanian orphanage
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Romania’s orphanages shocked the world when they were first exposed in 1989. But what happened to the children left behind? Vişinel Balan, now 27, tells his story. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Romania Children Childprotection


'Mama Boko Haram': one woman's extraordinary mission to rescue 'her boys' from terrorism
Aisha Wakil knew many of Boko Haram’s fighters as children. Now she uses those ties to broker peace deals, mediate hostage negotiations and convince militants to put down their weapons – but as the violence escalates, her task is becoming impossible. By Chika Oduah. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

BokoHaram Nigeria Podcasts

How Nespresso's coffee revolution got ground down
Nestlé’s sleek, chic capsule system changed the way we drink coffee. But in an age when everyone’s a coffee snob and waste is wickedness, can it survive? By Ed Cumming. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Coffee Nestlé Business

From the archives: The man who was caged in a zoo
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Ota Benga was kidnapped from Congo in 1904 and taken to the US, where he was exhibited with monkeys. His appalling story reveals the roots of a racial prejudice that still haunts us. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Race


How Hindu supremacists are tearing India apart
For seven decades, India has been held together by its constitution, which promises equality to all. But Narendra Modi’s BJP is remaking the nation into one where some people count as more Indian than others. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

India Hinduism NarendraModi

How Hindu supremacists are tearing India apart
For seven decades, India has been held together by its constitution, which promises equality to all. But Narendra Modi’s BJP is remaking the nation into one where some people count as more Indian than others. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

India Hinduism NarendraModi

What's wrong with WhatsApp
As social media has become more inhospitable, the appeal of private online groups has grown. But they hold their own dangers – to those both inside and out. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

WhatsApp Socialmedia Podcasts


From the archives: The man who sleeps in Hitler’s bed
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Kevin Wheatcroft has quietly amassed the world’s largest collection of Nazi memorabilia. Now he wants to share it with the world. What is behind this dark obsession?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Secondworldwar Nazism AdolfHitler


From the archives: Can we reverse the ageing process by putting young blood into older people?
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: A series of experiments has produced incredible results by giving young blood to old mice. Now the findings are being tested on humans. Ian Sample meets the scientists whose research could transform our lives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Ageing Biology Science Podcasts

The end of tourism?
The pandemic has devastated global tourism, and many will say ‘good riddance’ to overcrowded cities and rubbish-strewn natural wonders. Is there any way to reinvent an industry that does so much damage? By Christopher de Bellaigue. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Travel Podcasts Coronavirus Environment


From the archives – Karachi vice: inside the city torn apart by killings, extortion and terrorism
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Amid the mayhem that has turned parts of Karachi into no-go zones, reporters risk their lives to make sense of a crime wave that is virtually an insurgency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Pakistan Podcasts

My four miscarriages: why is losing a pregnancy so shrouded in mystery?
After losing four pregnancies, Jennie Agg set out to unravel the science of miscarriage. Then, a few months in, she found out she was pregnant again – just as the coronavirus pandemic hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Pregnancy Parentsandparenting Health Podcasts Children Medicine IVF

How a small Spanish town became one of Europe's worst Covid-19 hotspots
In the northern region of La Rioja, one medieval town has suffered a particularly deadly outbreak. And in such a tight-knit community, suspicion and recrimination can spread as fast as the virus. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Coronavirus Spain Europe


From the archives: The clean, green and slightly bonkers world of CBeebies
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: CBeebies isn’t just a channel, it’s a culture – and as a new parent you have little choice but to surrender to it. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Children'sTV Family Podcasts Children

How Hong Kong caught fire: the story of a radical uprising
Hong Kong used to be seen as cautious, pragmatic and materialistic. But in the past year, an increasingly bold protest movement has transformed the city. Now, as Beijing tightens its grip, how much longer can the movement survive? By Tania Branigan and Lily Kuo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

HongKong Protest

The power of crowds
Even before the pandemic, mass gatherings were under threat from draconian laws and corporate seizure of public space. Yet history shows that the crowd always finds a way to return. By Dan Hancox. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Society Protest Coronavirus Podcasts Police Publiclands


From the archive: One lawyer’s crusade to defend extreme pornography
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Myles Jackman is on a mission to change Britain’s obscenity laws. For him, it’s more than a job – it’s a moral calling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Law Pornography

What black America means to Europe
Many have attempted to claim that ‘things are better here’ for black people than in the US. This ignores both Europe’s colonial past and its own racist present. By Gary Younge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Race Podcasts Colonialism Protest Europe

The man in the iron lung
When he was six, Paul Alexander contracted polio and was paralysed for life. Today he is 74, and one of the last people in the world still using an iron lung. But after surviving one deadly outbreak, he did not expect to find himself threatened by another. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Polio Medicalresearch Vaccinesandimmunisation Disability Podcasts Coronavirus Health


From the archives: The gangsters on England's doorstep
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This time we revisit Felicity Lawrence’s 2016 report on the exploitation of migrant labour in the UK: In the bleak flatlands of East Anglia, workers are controlled by criminal gangs, and some are forced to commit crimes to pay off their debts. This is what happens when cheap labour is our only priority. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Migration Crime Farming Norfolk Podcasts

Extremist cops: how US law enforcement is failing to police itself
For decades, anti-government and white supremacist groups have been attempting to recruit police officers – and the authorities themselves aren’t even certain about the scale of the problem. By Maddy Crowell and Sylvia Varnham O’Regan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

USpolicing Race Podcasts Slavery Law(US)


From the archive: Why would someone steal the world’s rarest water lily?
For the next few weeks we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s pick: In January 2014, an endangered plant was taken from Kew Gardens, only a few years after scientists saved it from extinction. Sam Knight investigates what happens when plant obsession turns criminal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Podcasts Plants KewGardens

Cholera and coronavirus: why we must not repeat the same mistakes
Cholera has largely been beaten in the west, but it still kills tens of thousands of people in poorer countries every year. As we search for a cure for coronavirus, we have to make sure it will be available to everyone, not just to those in wealthy nations. By Neil Singh. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Cholera Coronavirus India Health Podcasts


From the archives: Gary Younge: Farewell to America
For the next couple of months we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: In 2015, after 12 years living in the US, Gary Younge was preparing to depart, amid another eruption of the country’s racial tensions. As we hear in Gary’s new introduction - which was recorded in January 2020 - half a decade later, this piece remains as grimly relevant as ever.. Help support our independent journal...

Race Society Podcasts

Can computers ever replace the classroom?
With millions of children shut out of schools worldwide, tech evangelists claim now is the time for AI education. But as the technology’s power grows, so too do the dangers that come with it. By Alex Beard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Education Artificialintelligence(AI) Technology Teaching Schools

The sound of icebergs melting: my journey into the Antarctic
Not long after Antarctica recorded some its highest-ever temperatures, I joined a group of scientists studying how human activity is transforming the continent. It wasn’t what we saw that was most astonishing – but what we heard. By Jonathan Watts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Wildlife Antarctica Climatechange Whales Podcasting


From the archives: The death and life of the great British pub
For the next couple of months we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. First up is Tom Lamont’s 2015 account of one London pub’s fight for survival: Across the country, pubs are being shuttered at an alarming rate – scooped up by developers and ransacked for profit – changing the face of neighbourhoods and turning our beloved locals into estate agents, betting shops, and luxury flats. This is the story of ...

Pubs Housing

'If one of us gets sick, we all get sick': the food workers on the coronavirus front line
Low-paid women in US poultry factories are leading the struggle for fair conditions and basic safety. As Covid-19 rips through plants across the country, they have a fight on their hands. By Mya Frazier. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Meatindustry Chicken Podcasts Coronavirus Employmentlaw USeconomy Meat Protest USwork&careers


Our new series, Forgotten stories of football: Manchester United v Galatasaray, 1993
The Guardian has launched a brand new podcast series, Forgotten stories of football, which is something like a football version of Audio Long Reads – some of the best tales from the beautiful game that you might not have heard before, written by some of the world’s leading sports journalists. In this episode, the second in the series: few had expected much from Galatasaray in the European Cup, but United were out of their depth on the pitch, amid terrifying hostility and harassment off it. Help support our ...

Football Sport Podcasts ManchesterUnited Galatasaray

Therapy under lockdown: 'I’m just as terrified as my patients are'
In a pandemic, the best we can do to take care of one another is to stay away from one another. Even Freud at his most misanthropic could never have come up with that. By Gary Greenberg. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Mentalhealth Psychiatry Coronavirus Podcasts SigmundFreud

Italian lessons: what we've learned from two months of home schooling
Schools in northern Italy were the first in Europe to close. Since then, teachers, parents and kids across the country have all had to adapt to a new existence – and the results have surprised everyone. By Tobias Jones. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Homeschooling Coronavirus Europe Infectiousdiseases Worldnews Science Education Children Parentsandparenting


How the face mask became the world's most coveted commodity
The global scramble for this vital item has exposed the harsh realities of international politics and the limits of the free market. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Coronavirus Internationaltrade Business Politics

‘Feasting on fantasy’: my month of extreme immersion in Disney Plus
Disney’s new streaming service arrived in the UK just as the coronavirus lockdown kicked in. With so many hours to fill, it seemed like a sensible investment. Pretty soon, it was infiltrating my every waking hour. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Disney+ Podcasts Television Children'sTV DisneyChannel Business

How coronavirus almost brought down the global financial system
The crisis has brought the economy to a near halt, and left millions of people out of work. But thanks to intervention on an unprecedented scale, a full-scale meltdown has been averted – for now. By Adam Tooze. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Economics Coronavirus Financialcrisis Economicpolicy Podcasts Recession


The WHO v coronavirus: why it can't handle the pandemic
Attacked by Trump and ignored by many of its most powerful members, the World Health Organization is facing a major crisis – just at the moment we need it most. By Stephen Buranyi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

WorldHealthOrganization Podcasts Coronavirus DonaldTrump

Splendid isolation: how I stopped time by sitting in a forest for 24 hours
My life seemed to be getting busier, faster: I felt constantly short of time – so I stepped outside it for a day and a night and did nothing. By Mark O’Connell. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Treesandforests Mindfulness Wildlife Podcasts Lifeandstyle


‘We can’t go back to normal’: how will coronavirus change the world?
Times of upheaval are always times of radical change. Some believe the pandemic is a once-in-a-generation chance to remake society and build a better future. Others fear it may only make existing injustices worse. By Peter C Baker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Coronavirus Society Climatechange

Real estate for the apocalypse: my journey into a survival bunker
Doomsday luxury accommodation is a booming business, offering customers a chance to sit out global pandemics and nuclear wars in comfort – as long as they have the money to pay for it. By Mark O’Connell. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Realestate Society Homes Podcasts Architecture


Cod wars to food banks: how a Lancashire fishing town is hanging on
When I grew up there, Fleetwood was a tough but proud fishing port. It’s taken some knocks in the years since, but not everyone has given up on it. By Luke Brown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Fishingindustry Poverty Society Podcasts Brexit

The invisible city: how a homeless man built a life underground
After decades among the hidden homeless, Dominic Van Allen dug himself a bunker beneath a public park. But his life would get even more precarious. By Tom Lamont. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Homelessness Housing Podcasts


Golden Dawn: the rise and fall of Greece’s neo-Nazis
A decade ago, violent racists exploited a national crisis and entered mainstream politics in Greece. The party has since been caught up in the biggest trial of Nazis since Nuremberg, and is now crumbling – but its success remains a warning. By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

GoldenDawnparty Europe Greece Financialcrisis Thefarright Podcasts

Why we need worst-case thinking to prevent pandemics
Threats to humanity, and how we address them, define our time. Why are we still so complacent about facing up to existential risk? By Toby Ord. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Infectiousdiseases Podcasts Health Coronavirus Science Historyofscience


What Noma did next: how the ‘New Nordic’ is reshaping the food world
In our time of climate crisis and inequality, as top chefs dream less of Michelin stars and more of changing the world, the New Nordic movement is reaching beyond haute cuisine into classrooms, supermarkets and parliaments. By Kieran Morris. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Food Restaurants Health Podcasts

Question time: my life as a quiz obsessive
I’ve taken part in quizzes all my life: in schools, in pubs and on TV shows, from India to the US. But the biggest secret is that curiosity, not knowledge, is the key to success. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Quizandtriviagames Lifeandstyle Podcasts

The end of farming?
For decades, the way we farm has been degrading land and destroying wildlife. Now there’s a revolution coming – but is it going to create more problems than it solves? By Christopher de Bellaigue. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Farming Podcasts Wildlife


Inside the mind of Dominic Cummings
He is now the country’s de facto project manager, but what does he actually believe? In a bid to find out, I read (almost) everything Cummings has written in the last decade. By Stefan Collini. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

DominicCummings Politics BorisJohnson

Inside the mind of Dominic Cummings
He is now the country’s de facto project manager, but what does he actually believe? In a bid to find out, I read (almost) everything Cummings has written in the last decade. By Stefan Collini. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

DominicCummings Politics BorisJohnson

How ultra-processed food took over your shopping basket
It’s cheap, attractive and convenient, and we eat it every day – it’s difficult not to. But is ultra-processed food making us ill and driving the global obesity crisis? By Bee Wilson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Food Nutrition Health Supermarkets Health&wellbeing


Tampon wars: the battle to overthrow the Tampax empire
For decades, one company has ruled the world of tampons. But a new wave of brands has emerged, selling themselves as more ethical, more feminist and more ecological. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Business Health Menstruation Science


What I have learned from my suicidal patients
A GP has minutes to try to convince a person that life is worth living. It’s a challenge that brings rare rewards. By Gavin Francis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Doctors Scotland GPs Mentalhealth Deathanddying

False witness: why is the US still using hypnosis to convict criminals?
For decades, US law enforcement has used ‘forensic hypnosis’ to help solve crimes – yet despite growing evidence that it is junk science, this method is still being used to send people to death row. By Ariel Ramchandani. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Law UScrime

False witness: why is the US still using hypnosis to convict criminals?
For decades, US law enforcement has used ‘forensic hypnosis’ to help solve crimes – yet despite growing evidence that it is junk science, this method is still being used to send people to death row. By Ariel Ramchandani. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Law UScrime


Kudos, leaderboards, QOMs: how fitness app Strava became a religion
The Strava app offers community, training data and motivation to millions of athletes. Even runners who dislike tech can’t bear to be without it. By Rose George. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Fitness Running Health Technology

The weird magic of eiderdown
In Iceland, the harvesting of these precious feathers has created a peculiar bond between human and duck. What can this unique relationship teach us? By Edward Posnett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Birds Iceland Animals Wildlife

A scandal in Oxford: the curious case of the stolen gospel
What links an eccentric Oxford classics don, billionaire US evangelicals, and a tiny, missing fragment of an ancient manuscript? Charlotte Higgins unravels a multimillion-dollar riddle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

UniversityofOxford Podcasts Christianity Academics


Bring up the bodies: the retired couple who find drowning victims
Gene and Sandy Ralston are a married couple in their 70s, who also happen to be among North America’s leading experts at searching for the dead. By Doug Horner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Forensicscience Rivers Oceans

How the US helped create El Salvador’s bloody gang war
The story of El Salvador’s gang problem is a study in shortsighted thinking – and Donald Trump’s policies threaten to make a bad situation even worse. By William Wheeler. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

ElSalvador Gangs USnews USimmigration DonaldTrump


Freedom without constraints: how the US squandered its cold war victory
The US believed the American way of life was humankind’s ultimate destiny. But unrestrained greed has led to an era of injustice and division. By Andrew Bacevich. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Podcasts Politics Russia Coldwar DonaldTrump

The empty promises of Marie Kondo and the craze for minimalism
From the ‘KonMari method’ to Apple’s barely there design philosophy, we are forever being urged to declutter and simplify our lives. But does minimalism really make us any happier? By Kyle Chayka. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Podcasts MarieKondo

Why WeWork went wrong
The office-space startup took a tumble when investors tired of its messianic CEO and lack of profits. But why were its backers – the House of Saud among them – so keen to pour billions into it in the first place? By Matthew Zeitlin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

WeWork Business Money SaudiArabia



Best audio long reads of 2019: the Anthropocene epoch
Have we entered a new phase of planetary history? Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history. By Nicola Davison. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Environment Geology Science Climatechange Fossils Plastics

Best audio long reads of 2019: my infant son’s struggle with food
After her son was born prematurely, Tahmima Anam thought the worst was behind her. But when he was allowed to come home two months later, a new problem emerged: he refused to eat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Eatingdisorders Children Health Food


Best audio long reads of 2019: Hand dryers v paper towels
For a century, the humble paper towel has dominated public toilets. But a new generation of hand dryers has sparked a war for loo supremacy. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Health Sanitation Hygiene Business Podcasts

People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer
These tiny pests adapt so successfully to changing conditions that they have become humankind’s deadliest predator. We might soon be able to eradicate them – but should we? By Timothy Winegard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Insects Science Health


How the right’s radical thinktanks reshaped the Conservative party
In the wake of the Brexit vote, ultra free market thinktanks have gained exceptional access to the heart of Boris Johnson’s government. By Felicity Lawrence, Rob Evans and David Pegg. Additional reporting by Caelainn Barr and Pamela Duncan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Conservatives Politics Thinktanks Podcasts

The great American tax haven: why the super-rich love South Dakota
It’s known for being the home of Mount Rushmore – and not much else. But thanks to its relish for deregulation, the state is fast becoming the most profitable place for the mega-wealthy to park their billions. By Oliver Bullough. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Taxhavens Taxavoidance Money Politics Podcasts

How our home delivery habit reshaped the world
The great trick of online retail has been to get us to shop more and think less about how our purchases reach our homes. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Retailindustry Consumerspending Podcasts Business Amazon


How big tech is dragging us towards the next financial crash
Like the big banks, big tech uses its lobbying muscle to avoid regulation, and thinks it should play by different rules. And like the banks, it could be about to wreak financial havoc on us all. By Rana Foroohar. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Financialcrisis Business Technology Technologysector Banking


How liberalism became ‘the god that failed’ in eastern Europe
After communism fell, the promises of western liberalism to transform central and eastern Europe were never fully realised – and now we are seeing the backlash. By Ivan Krastev and Stephen Holmes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Podcasts Europe Politics

Why do people hate vegans?
It has left the beige-tinted margins and become social media’s most glamorous look. But why does veganism still provoke so much anger? By George Reynolds. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Veganism Podcasts Lifeandstyle Health&wellbeing


'A body drifted past the window': surviving the Ladbroke Grove train crash
On 5 October 1999, two trains collided at speed in west London, killing both drivers and 29 passengers. Barrister Greg Treverton-Jones, who survived the crash and worked on the harrowing inquiry, pieced together what went wrong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Traincrashes Podcasts

The real David Attenborough
He is the most beloved figure in Britain, and, at 93, a global superstar. His films long shied away from discussing humanity’s impact on the planet. Now they are sounding the alarm – but is it too late? By Patrick Barkham. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

DavidAttenborough Wildlife Documentary Climatechange Television Podcasts Television&radio

Collision course: why are cars killing more and more pedestrians?
For drivers, roads are safer than ever – but for people on foot, they are getting deadlier. Car companies and Silicon Valley claim that they have the solution. But is that too good to be true? By Peter C Baker. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Roadsafety Automotiveindustry Podcasts Pedestrianisation


Flour power: meet the bread heads baking a better loaf
The days of the mass-produced pappy white British supermarket loaf may be numbered. Meet the bread heads revolutionising the way we eat. By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Bread Baking Health&wellbeing Food


The girl in the box: the mysterious crime that shocked Germany
On 15 September 1981, 10-year-old Ursula Herrmann headed home by bike from her cousin’s house. She never arrived. So began one of Germany’s most notorious postwar criminal cases, which remains contentious to this day. By Xan Rice. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Germany

Ship of horrors: life and death on the lawless high seas
From bullying and sexual assault to squalid living conditions and forced labour, working at sea can be a grim business – and one deep-sea fishing fleet is particularly notorious. By Ian Urbina. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Slavery Fishingindustry


The myth of Eurabia: how a far-right conspiracy theory went mainstream
Once an obscure idea confined to the darker corners of the internet, the anti-Islam ideology is now visible in the everyday politics of the west. How did this happen? By Andrew Brown. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

DonaldTrump September112001 Islamophobia SteveBannon Thefarright

Why can’t we agree on what’s true any more?
It’s not about foreign trolls, filter bubbles or fake news. Technology encourages us to believe we can all have first-hand access to the ‘real’ facts – and now we can’t stop fighting about it. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Newspapers Magazines Media Internet Socialmedia Brexit

Dark crystals: the brutal reality behind a booming wellness craze
Demand for ‘healing’ crystals is soaring – but many are mined in deadly conditions in one of the world’s poorest countries. And there is little evidence that this billion-dollar industry is cleaning up its act. By Tess McClure. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Alternativemedicine Mining Madagascar Africa


Inside the bizarre, bungled raid on North Korea's Madrid embassy
In February, a gang of armed men took a North Korean official hostage and demanded that he defect. When he refused, their plan fell apart, and they fled. Who were they, and why did they risk everything on this wild plot? By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

NorthKorea Spain KimJong-un DonaldTrump


The race to create a perfect lie detector, and the dangers of succeeding
AI and brain-scanning technology could soon make it possible to reliably detect when people are lying. But do we really want to know? By Amit Katwala. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Psychology Science Technology Ethics UKcriminaljustice Police UScrime

The machine always wins: what drives our addiction to social media
Social media was supposed to liberate us, but for many people it has proved addictive, punishing and toxic. What keeps us hooked? By Richard Seymour. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Socialmedia Twitter Facebook Smartphones


Justin Trudeau: the rise and fall of a political brand
Thanks to his clever use of social media, he was dubbed the first prime minister of the Instagram age – but after four years in power, cracks in his image have started to show. By Ashifa Kassam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

JustinTrudeau Canada Instagram

The air conditioning trap: how cold air is heating the world
The warmer it gets, the more we use air conditioning. The more we use air conditioning, the warmer it gets. Is there any way out of this trap? By Stephen Buranyi. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Environment Climatechange

Is fair trade finished?
Fairtrade changed the way we shop. But major companies have started to abandon it and set up their own in-house imitations – threatening the very idea of fair trade. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Fairtrade


‘Loud, obsessive, tribal’: the radicalisation of remain
They hate Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn. They no longer trust the BBC. They love civil servants, legal experts and James O’Brien. And now, consumed by the battle against Brexit, hardcore remainers are no longer the moderates. By Daniel Cohen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

EuropeanUnion Brexit

How the media contributed to the migrant crisis
Disaster reporting plays to set ideas about people from ‘over there’. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Migration Refugees Syria MiddleEastandNorthAfrica Greece Europe Media

Speed kills: are police chases out of control?
The public expects cops to pursue the bad guys. But a shocking tally of deaths has exposed how often these chases put the public at risk. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Police IndependentOfficeforPoliceConduct Roadsafety Crime


Enslaved on a British cannabis farm: ‘The plants were more valuable than my life’
Minh was 16 when he was kidnapped, raped and trafficked to the UK, and then locked up and forced to grow cannabis. But when the police found him, he was treated like a criminal rather than a victim. By Annie Kelly. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Humantrafficking Slavery Drugstrade UKcriminaljustice


Boar wars: how wild hogs are trashing European cities
They have become a menace in European cities. In Barcelona, where wild boar are jostling tourists and raiding rubbish bins, the fightback has begun. By Bernhard Warner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Wildlife Cities Barcelona Europe

‘State capture’: the corruption investigation that has shaken South Africa
Gavin Watson was a hero of the struggle against apartheid. But this once-powerful businessman is now caught up in a sweeping inquiry that goes to the heart of how a nation is run. By Mark Gevisser. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

SouthAfrica JacobZuma CyrilRamaphosa Africa


The rise and fall of French cuisine
French food was the envy of the world – before it became trapped by its own history. Can a new school of traditionalists revive its glories? By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

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Are your tinned tomatoes picked by slave labour?
How the Italian mafia makes millions by exploiting migrants. By Tobias Jones and Ayo Awokoya. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Migration Italy Slavery Food&drinkindustry Farming


The invention of Essex: how a county became a caricature
From Loadsamoney and ‘Basildon man’ to Towie and Brexit – Essex has long been held up as both the authentic England and the crudest, stupidest symbol of Englishness. By Tim Burrows. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Essex TheOnlyWayisEssex

The mindfulness conspiracy
It is sold as a force that can help us cope with the ravages of capitalism, but with its inward focus, mindful meditation may be the enemy of activism • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Mindfulness Mentalhealth Meditation Health&wellbeing

El Chapo: what the rise and fall of the kingpin reveals about the war on drugs
As the capture and conviction of Mexico’s notorious drug lord has shown, taking down the boss doesn’t mean taking down the organisation • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Joaquín'ElChapo'Guzmán Mexico Drugstrade US-Mexicoborder Drugspolicy


Why parents are addicted to Calpol
It is the one medicine we reach for whenever our babies are feverish or in pain. What’s the secret of its success? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Children Family Drugs Health

'I wouldn't be the refugee, I'd be the girl who kicked ass': how taekwondo made me
When she arrived in the US as a 10-year-old refugee, Dina Nayeri found it hard to fit in. But that all changed when she hatched a plan to get into Harvard – by becoming a taekwondo champion • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

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The price of plenty: how beef changed America – podcast
Exploitation and predatory pricing drove the transformation of the US beef industry – and created the model for modern agribusiness • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Beef Cattle Farming Agriculture


The price of plenty: how beef changed America
Exploitation and predatory pricing drove the transformation of the US beef industry – and created the model for modern agribusiness • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Beef Cattle Farming Agriculture

‘Socialism for the rich’: the evils of bad economics – podcast
The economic arguments adopted by Britain and the US in the 1980s led to vastly increased inequality – and gave the false impression that this outcome was not only inevitable, but good • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Economicpolicy Taxandspending Economics Taxavoidance Corporategovernance

‘Socialism for the rich’: the evils of bad economics
The economic arguments adopted by Britain and the US in the 1980s led to vastly increased inequality – and gave the false impression that this outcome was not only inevitable, but good • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Economicpolicy Taxandspending Economics Taxavoidance Corporategovernance


The Anthropocene epoch: have we entered a new phase of planetary history?
Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Geology Climatechange Fossils Plastics Environment Science

‘A zombie party’: the deepening crisis of conservatism
The traditional right is clinging on to power – but its ideas are dead in the water • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Conservatives Politics MargaretThatcher RonaldReagan Republicans


Building the Brexit party: how Nigel Farage copied Italy's digital populists – podcast
The former Ukip leader forged an alliance with the Five Star Movement just as they bulldozed Italian politics using a tightly controlled digital operation. And now he’s putting their techniques to work in Britain • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

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Building the Brexit party: how Nigel Farage copied Italy's digital populists
The former Ukip leader forged an alliance with the Five Star Movement just as they bulldozed Italian politics using a tightly controlled digital operation. And now he’s putting their techniques to work in Britain • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Brexitparty FiveStarMovement Italy BeppeGrillo Europe UKIndependenceparty(Ukip)

From The Archers to HBO: how Sally Wainwright conquered TV – podcast
She was fired by Emmerdale, injected some much-needed grit into Coronation Street and struck gold with Last Tango in Halifax and Happy Valley. Now Sally Wainwright is going international • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Television Drama Televisionindustry HappyValley CoronationStreet Emmerdale


From The Archers to HBO: how Sally Wainwright conquered TV
She was fired by Emmerdale, injected some much-needed grit into Coronation Street and struck gold with Last Tango in Halifax and Happy Valley. Now Sally Wainwright is going international • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Television Drama Televisionindustry HappyValley CoronationStreet Emmerdale


Blow up: how half a tonne of cocaine transformed the life of an island – podcast
In 2001, a smugglers’ yacht washed up in the Azores and disgorged its contents. The island of São Miguel was quickly flooded with high-grade cocaine – and nearly 20 years on, it is still feeling the effects • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Portugal Drugs

Blow up: how half a tonne of cocaine transformed the life of an island
In 2001, a smugglers’ yacht washed up in the Azores and disgorged its contents. The island of São Miguel was quickly flooded with high-grade cocaine – and nearly 20 years on, it is still feeling the effects • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Portugal Drugs

How the news took over reality – podcast
Is engagement with current affairs key to being a good citizen? Or could an endless torrent of notifications be harming democracy as well as our wellbeing? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Politics Technology USpolitics Internet


How the news took over reality
Is engagement with current affairs key to being a good citizen? Or could an endless torrent of notifications be harming democracy as well as our wellbeing? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Politics Technology USpolitics Internet

Into the pharaoh's chamber: how I fell in love with ancient Egypt
Amid the convulsions in the years following the Arab Spring, Peter Hessler went to the ancient city of Amarna, site of another short-lived attempt to remake a nation • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Egyptology History Archaeology


Busting the myth that depression doesn't affect people in poor countries – podcast
For decades, many psychiatrists believed depression was a uniquely western phenomenon. But in the last few years, a new movement has turned this thinking on its head • Warning: this article contains discussion of suicide • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Depression Mentalhealth Science Africa Psychiatry Medicine

Busting the myth that depression doesn't affect people in poor countries
For decades, many psychiatrists believed depression was a uniquely western phenomenon. But in the last few years, a new movement has turned this thinking on its head • Warning: this article contains discussion of suicide • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Depression Mentalhealth Science Africa Psychiatry Medicine

The shocking rape trial that galvanised Spain’s feminists and the far right – podcast
The ‘wolf pack’ case inspired widespread anger and protests against sexual assault laws in Spain. But the anti-feminist backlash that followed has helped propel the far right to its biggest gains since Franco. • Warning: this episode contains strong language and descriptions of sexual abuse. • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

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The shocking rape trial that galvanised Spain’s feminists and the far right
The ‘wolf pack’ case inspired widespread anger and protests against sexual assault laws in Spain. But the anti-feminist backlash that followed has helped propel the far right to its biggest gains since Franco. • Warning: this episode contains strong language and descriptions of sexual abuse. • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Spain Gender Politics Podcasts Rapeandsexualassault Protest Feminism


How to identify a body: the Marchioness disaster and my life in forensic pathology – podcast
In my career, I have investigated many of the UK’s worst disasters. Few cases were as harrowing as the sinking of the Marchioness in 1989, which left scores dead and almost impossible to identify • Warning: this piece contains graphic descriptions of dead bodies • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Deathanddying TheThames Police

How to identify a body: the Marchioness disaster and my life in forensic pathology
In my career, I have investigated many of the UK’s worst disasters. Few cases were as harrowing as the sinking of the Marchioness in 1989, which left scores dead and almost impossible to identify • Warning: this piece contains graphic descriptions of dead bodies • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Deathanddying TheThames Police


‘For five years we dreaded every meal’: my infant son’s struggle with food
After her son was born prematurely, Tahmima Anam thought the worst was behind her. But when he was allowed to come home two months later, a new problem emerged: he refused to eat • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Eatingdisorders Childbirth Prematurebirth Health

China’s hi-tech war on its Muslim minority – podcast
Smartphones and the internet gave the Uighurs a sense of their own identity – but now the Chinese state is using technology to strip them of it Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Uighurs China Surveillance Xinjiang Islamophobia Islam

China’s hi-tech war on its Muslim minority
Smartphones and the internet gave the Uighurs a sense of their own identity – but now the Chinese state is using technology to strip them of it Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Uighurs China Surveillance Xinjiang Islamophobia Islam


Can we stop AI outsmarting humanity? – podcast
The spectre of superintelligent machines doing us harm is not just science fiction, technologists say – so how can we ensure AI remains ‘friendly’ to its makers? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Artificialintelligence(AI) Consciousness Technology Computing Internet


Can we stop AI outsmarting humanity?
The spectre of superintelligent machines doing us harm is not just science fiction, technologists say – so how can we ensure AI remains ‘friendly’ to its makers? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Artificialintelligence(AI) Consciousness Technology Computing Internet

Smart talking: are our devices threatening our privacy? – podcast
Millions of us now have virtual assistants, in our homes and our pockets. Even children’s toys are getting smart. But when we talk to them, who is listening? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Smartspeakers Virtualassistant GoogleHome AmazonAlexa GoogleAssistant Apple

Smart talking: are our devices threatening our privacy?
Millions of us now have virtual assistants, in our homes and our pockets. Even children’s toys are getting smart. But when we talk to them, who is listening? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Smartspeakers Virtualassistant GoogleHome AmazonAlexa GoogleAssistant Apple


Can the world quench China’s bottomless thirst for milk? – podcast
China’s leaders have championed milk as the emblem of a modern, affluent society – but their radical plan to triple the nation’s consumption will have a huge environmental cost • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

China Milk(drink) Agriculture Food

Can the world quench China’s bottomless thirst for milk?
China’s leaders have championed milk as the emblem of a modern, affluent society – but their radical plan to triple the nation’s consumption will have a huge environmental cost • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

China Milk Agriculture Food

Why Israel is quietly cosying up to Gulf monarchies – podcast
After decades of hostility, a shared hatred of Iran – and a mutual fondness for Trump – is bringing Israel’s secret links with Gulf kingdoms out into the open • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Israel SaudiArabia UnitedArabEmirates BenjaminNetanyahu Oman Qatar Palestinianterritories


Why Israel is quietly cosying up to Gulf monarchies
After decades of hostility, a shared hatred of Iran – and a mutual fondness for Trump – is bringing Israel’s secret links with Gulf kingdoms out into the open • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Israel SaudiArabia UnitedArabEmirates BenjaminNetanyahu Oman Qatar Palestinianterritories

Dirty lies: how the car industry hid the truth about diesel emissions
The ‘Dieselgate’ scandal was suppressed for years – while we should have been driving electric cars • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Automotiveindustry Pollution Electric hybridandlow-emissioncars Environment Volkswagen(VW) Health


What animals can teach us about politics – podcast
Decades of studying primates has convinced me that animal politics are not so different from our own – and even in the wild, leadership is about much more than being a bully • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Animals DonaldTrump Politics Biology


What animals can teach us about politics
Decades of studying primates has convinced me that animal politics are not so different from our own – and even in the wild, leadership is about much more than being a bully • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Animals DonaldTrump Politics Biology

How violent American vigilantes at the border led to Trump’s wall
From the 80s onwards, the borderlands were rife with paramilitary cruelty and racism. But the president’s rhetoric has thrown fuel on the fire • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Mexico DonaldTrump USpolitics Trumpadministration BarackObama


Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth – podcast
After water, concrete is the most widely used substance on the planet. But its benefits mask enormous dangers to human health – and to culture itself Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Cities Environment Constructionindustry China


Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth
After water, concrete is the most widely used substance on the planet. But its benefits mask enormous dangers to human health – and to culture itself Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Cities Environment Constructionindustry China

Spain’s Watergate: inside the corruption scandal that changed a nation – podcast
The Gürtel case began with one Madrid mogul. Over the next decade, it grew into the biggest corruption investigation in Spain’s recent history, sweeping up hundreds of corrupt politicians and businessmen – and shattering its political system • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Spain Politics Europe

Spain’s Watergate: inside the corruption scandal that changed a nation
The Gürtel case began with one Madrid mogul. Over the next decade, it grew into the biggest corruption investigation in Spain’s recent history, sweeping up hundreds of corrupt politicians and businessmen – and shattering its political system • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Spain Politics Europe


How the world got hooked on palm oil – podcast
It’s the miracle ingredient in everything from biscuits to shampoo. But our dependence on palm oil has devastating environmental consequences. Is it too late to break the habit? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Palmoil Indonesia Malaysia Wildlife Environment

How the world got hooked on palm oil
It’s the miracle ingredient in everything from biscuits to shampoo. But our dependence on palm oil has devastating environmental consequences. Is it too late to break the habit? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Palmoil Indonesia Malaysia Wildlife Environment

How the US has hidden its empire – podcast
The United States likes to think of itself as a republic, but it holds territories all over the world – the map you always see doesn’t tell the whole story Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Colonialism Maps Americas


How the US has hidden its empire
The United States likes to think of itself as a republic, but it holds territories all over the world – the map you always see doesn’t tell the whole story Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Colonialism Maps Americas

How a Slovakian neo-Nazi got elected – podcast
In 2013, the far-right politician Marian Kotleba won a shock victory in regional elections. Four years later, he was voted out in a landslide. But now he’s running for president Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Thefarright Slovakia Antisemitism

How a Slovakian neo-Nazi got elected
In 2013, the far-right politician Marian Kotleba won a shock victory in regional elections. Four years later, he was voted out in a landslide. But now he’s running for president Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Thefarright Slovakia Antisemitism


The battle for the future of Stonehenge – podcast
Britain’s favourite monument is stuck in the middle of a bad-tempered row over road traffic Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Stonehenge Archaeology Heritage Conservation Roadtransport

The battle for the future of Stonehenge
Britain’s favourite monument is stuck in the middle of a bad-tempered row over road traffic Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Stonehenge Archaeology Heritage Conservation Roadtransport

The class pay gap: why it pays to be privileged – podcast
Within Britain’s elite occupations, the advantages of class are still mistaken for talent Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Inequality Work&careers Classissues Oxbridgeandelitism Careers Privateschools


The class pay gap: why it pays to be privileged
Within Britain’s elite occupations, the advantages of class are still mistaken for talent Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod...

Inequality Work&careers Classissues Oxbridgeandelitism Careers Privateschools




Rwanda’s Khashoggi: who killed the exiled spy chief? – podcast
Dissident Patrick Karegeya had fled to South Africa, but was murdered in a well-planned attack. Now an inquest into his death threatens to bring unwelcome attention to Rwanda’s feted leader • Read the text version here...

Rwanda PaulKagame JamalKhashoggi SouthAfrica

Rwanda’s Khashoggi: who killed the exiled spy chief?
Dissident Patrick Karegeya had fled to South Africa, but was murdered in a well-planned attack. Now an inquest into his death threatens to bring unwelcome attention to Rwanda’s feted leader • Read the text version here...

Rwanda PaulKagame JamalKhashoggi SouthAfrica

Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far? – podcast
Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences • Read the text version here...

Deathanddying Netherlands


Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far?
Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences • Read the text version here...

Deathanddying Netherlands

When the ice melts: the catastrophe of vanishing glaciers
As global temperatures rise, shrivelling glaciers and thawing permafrost threaten yet more climate disruption. How should we confront what is happening to our world? • Read the text version here...

Glaciers Climatechange Alaska Polarregions Environment


‘We the people’: the battle to define populism
The noisy dispute over the meaning of populism is more than just an academic squabble – it’s a crucial argument about what we expect from democracy • Read the text version here...

DonaldTrump BernieSanders JeremyCorbyn Brexit


Why exercise alone won’t save us – podcast
Sedentary lifestyles are killing us – we need to build activity into our everyday lives, not just leave it for the gym • Read the text version here...

Health&wellbeing Fitness Health

Why exercise alone won’t save us
Sedentary lifestyles are killing us – we need to build activity into our everyday lives, not just leave it for the gym • Read the text version here...

Health&wellbeing Fitness Health


Inside China's audacious global propaganda campaign – podcast
Beijing is buying up media outlets and training scores of foreign journalists to ‘tell China’s story well’ – as part of a worldwide propaganda campaign of astonishing scope and ambition • Read the text version here...

Newspapers&magazines China AsiaPacific Radioindustry Newspapers Televisionindustry

Inside China's audacious global propaganda campaign
Beijing is buying up media outlets and training scores of foreign journalists to ‘tell China’s story well’ – as part of a worldwide propaganda campaign of astonishing scope and ambition • Read the text version here...

Newspapers&magazines China AsiaPacific Radioindustry Newspapers Televisionindustry