The NPR Politics Podcast

The NPR Politics Podcast Podcast

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

As Trump's Care Moves To White House, Doctor Again Evades Key Questions
The president's care will continue at the White House. Signs still point to a severe case of Covid-19, though his doctor continues to dodge questions posed by NPR and other outlets. We do not know if the president is on blood thinners or the condition of his lungs.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and science correspondent Rob Stein.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podca...

Questions Persist About Trump's Health After Second Dissembling Briefing
The president has started a steroid and his doctor acknowledges that Trump has in fact received supplemental oxygen. His course of treatment suggests a severe case of Covid-19, though his team suggests he could be back at the White House as soon as tomorrow.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, science correspondent Richard Harris, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Pod...

After Doctor Said Trump Doing Well, Source Familiar With His Health Said Otherwise
FOLLOW OUR COVERAGE: https://n.pr/3nj0elUMuddled messaging from the White House has sent confusing signals about the president's well-being. We talk about what we know about his condition and treatment.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House reporter Franco Ordoñez, science correspondent Joe Palca.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout...


Weekly Roundup: October 2nd
The White House says the president's symptoms have been mild so far, but his positive test is likely to have far-reaching effects on Capitol Hill and the campaign trail.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The ...

The President And First Lady Test Positive For Coronavirus
President Trump tweeted after midnight Friday that he and the First Lady Melania Trump had both tested positive for the coronavirus. The White House physician also released a formal letter confirming the news. This comes after top White House aide Hope Hicks tested positive Thursday.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.L...

Two Million Americans Have Already Voted
Early voting is way up in 2020. But conspiracy theories spread by the president and protests at polling places have spooked some voters, and changed how some plan to cast their ballots.Life Kit: How To Cast Your BallotThis episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, voting correspondent Pam Fessler, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics ...


Rail Force One: Biden Leads Whistle-Stop Tour After Debate
The Biden campaign chartered an Amtrak train to take the former vice president through Ohio and Pennsylvania after the first presidential debate. And, voters react to the chaos of last night's event.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Da...

Debate: Trump Refuses To Condemn White Supremacy, Biden Pitches Directly To Camera
The first debate was chaotic and light on policy as the participants disregarded the agreed-upon rules. President Trump repeatedly interrupted the discussion in order to lambast Joe Biden and debate moderator Chris Wallace. The president once again refused to condemn white supremacy and did not agree to respect the results of the election. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politic...

The NYT Says Trump Paid Little In Income Taxes; What Does That Mean For The Campaign?
A New York Times investigation published on Sunday said that President Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes each year in 2016 and 2017, which the president denied at a news conference using a familiar retort: "fake news." This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected]


Amy Coney Barrett Nominated And Expected To Be Confirmed To Supreme Court
The former Antonin Scalia clerk currently serves on the federal bench after a fifteen-year stint as a law professor at Notre Dame. The Senate will now consider her nomination, where Republicans appear to have the votes to ensure a swift confirmation.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast ...

Weekly Roundup: September 25th
There was bipartisan backlash after Trump suggested that he would have to see the results before committing to a peaceful presidential transition. And Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the first woman in U.S. history to lie in state at the Capitol.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] ...

How Campaigns Work: Fundraising
In an ongoing series congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell looks under the hood at campaigns. From how they raise money to what they do once they have it.This episode, Kelsey looks at political fundraising. She talks to former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci about how you ask for those big checks from millionaires, and the head of digital fundraising for Bernie Sanders about how you get a lot of people to donate just a little bit of money over and over again.This episode: White Hou...


200,000 Americans Are Dead — And It Will Take More Than A Vaccine To Halt Pandemic
It is hard to conceptualize 200,000 lives lost. Hundreds more die each day. And a vaccine, with partial efficacy and patchwork adoption, won't be enough to end the pandemic. That would take more testing, contact tracing and social distancing. Also, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was honored in services at the high court.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, science correspondent Allison Aubrey and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe ...

It's Been Months Since Congress Last Passed Coronavirus Aid. Americans Are Struggling.
As Republicans secure the votes to move forward on a Supreme Court nomination, government funding negotiations hit a snag. And Americans are struggling after months with no new federal coronavirus support.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The ...

Who Are The Women Under Consideration To Replace RBG?
"Most of them [the potential nominees] are young, and they've gone through the [nomination] process very recently," Trump said. He noted that one person he is considering for the vacancy is 38 years old and could be on the court for 50 years. Stay Up To Date: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Live BlogThis episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpoliti...


Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Progressive Icon, Dead At 87
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. OUR COVERAGE: - Obituary, by Nina Totenberg - Live Blog and Latest News - Trump's Supreme Court Short-list - What Happened With Merrick Garland And Why It Matters Now (from 2018)This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, legal correspondent Nina Totenburg, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.C...

Weekly Roundup: September 18th
A steady presidential race remains steady: Joe Biden's lead is in the high single-digits nationally. But Trump's messaging tying Joe Biden to socialism is finding purchase with Latino voters in Florida, a state that is essential to the president's re-election effort.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign reporter Juana Summers, White House reporter Franco Ordoñez, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Emai...

Bad News/Good News: Vaccine Access Months Away, But Masks Really Help
The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Congress that a widely-available vaccine probably won't be available until well into 2021. But he did say that masks are perhaps even more useful in preventing the spread. That will prove especially true if people are reluctant to take the vaccine.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and science correspondent Joe Palca.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprp...


Analysis: Biden Leads, But He's Still Short Of 270 Electoral Votes
Joe Biden maintains a lead in key states Trump won in 2016, but the race remains tight in Florida. Arizona and Georgia are toss-ups, and Texas is pink. And, the race is remarkably stable. Our reporting from across the country finds that a vanishingly small share of voters are persuadable. That makes the election primarily a turnout contest.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe t...

They Voted For Obama, Then Trump—Now What?
Understanding the motivation of voters in Michigan and Pennsylvania is key to understand the 2016 coalition that allowed President Trump to notch a decisive electoral college victory. Is Joe Biden doing enough to draw that support back to the Democratic column?This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, national political correspondent Don Gonyea, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and political reporter Abigail Censkey of WKAR in Michigan.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast ...

Trump's Nevada Rally Violated State Covid Rules. He Held It Anyway.
After the weekend's rally, aimed at building support among Hispanic voters, President Trump spent Monday in California hearing about disaster response there. Kamala Harris is set to visit her home state tomorrow.And Democrats have made the decision to abandon door-knocking to engage with voters. The Trump campaign alleges it's knocking on a million doors a week. So who has the best strategy?This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspond...


Weekly Roundup: September 11th
As wildfires rage across the west, activists are noting the campaign's relative silence on the issue of climate change. Natural disasters of all sorts, from heat waves to hurricanes, are made worse as humans continue to increase their emissions.And the Treasury Department and Microsoft have disclosed new election interference efforts by foreign powers, including Russia. The disclosures come the same week a whistleblower alleged Trump administration officials pushed intelligence staff to downplay findings th...

Whistle-blower: Trump Officials Pushed Intel Staff To Downplay Russian Interference
The Department of Homeland Security official says in his complaint that he was ordered to halt reports that made the president "look bad." DHS and the White House deny the allegation. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, election security editor Phil Ewing, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playli...

On Tape: President Trump Admits To Downplaying The Pandemic
President Trump was aware of the severity of the coronavirus in early February, telling Bob Woodward that it was much more severe than the flu. In public, Trump used the flu comparison in a different way: highlighting the flu's high seasonal death toll compared to the few dozen early cases of coronavirus.He admitted to Woodward in March that he was intentionally downplaying the pandemic in order to avoid panic.Those revelations are contained in Woodward's new book Rage.The United States death toll from the ...


President Trump Pushes Unrealistic Vaccine Timeline In Effort To Win Votes
Pressed on whether he was politicizing vaccine development by suggesting that a vaccine could come before election day (very unlikely), President Trump insisted his pitch was that a vaccine would be available by the end of the year, and that he was just saying it may be possible by late October or early November. And, his campaign is struggling with money.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe...

Labor Day Is When Election Season Kicks Into High Gear. Here's Where Voters Are.
In this Labor Day episode of the podcast, we hear from voters in Wisconsin, Iowa, and Pennsylvania about how they're feeling about their options in November.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson, Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Dai...

Weekly Roundup: September 4th
Isolated bursts of violence between protesters have left at least three Americans dead. But demonstrations across the country remain primarily peaceful. And reporting in The Atlantic alleges that President Trump called military service members "losers" and repeatedly privately degraded troops.Also: Facebook now acknowledges that it has a role to play in election security, but experts say that the moves it announced this week are insufficient given the scale of the problems — especially when it comes to disi...


The Pandemic Is Slowing Nationally, But Still Severe
Six million Americans have been diagnosed with coronavirus and more than 185 thousand have died. Cases nationally are trending downward, but the Midwest is seeing a youth-driven surge. And while the number of people seeking unemployment money has continued to tick downward, the absolute numbers of folks out of work remain high when compared to January.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, science correspondent Allison Aubrey, and economics correspondent Sc...

Lawmakers On Both Sides Of The Aisle Contend With New Political Realities
Republicans' internal divisions, and divisions with President Trump, made legislating nearly impossible during Trump's first term. There's little sign that thing would be different should he be re-elected.And Sen. Ed Markey, Democrat of Massachusetts, won his primary against Rep. Joe Kennedy III. Congressman Richard Neal, chairman of the House Ways and Means committee, also held-off a insurgent challenger. But the contests illustrate a new reality of Democratic politics: primary challenges are here to stay....

Trump Defends Man Accused Of Shooting Protesters, Visits Kenosha
The president is in Kenosha, Wis., today, a city that has been rocked by protests after police shot a black man several times in the back a little over a week ago. Despite some incidents of looting, crime appears to be on par with recent years and near a three-decade low. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politic...


Joe Biden: 'Do I Look Like A Radical Socialist With A Soft Spot For Rioters?'
Biden's remarks come after several days of unrest in cities, including the shooting deaths of two protesters in Wisconsin, allegedly by an armed white vigilante, and a fatal shooting in Portland, Ore., where a man was killed during a night of confrontations between Trump supporters and racial justice demonstrators.Also, how activists at the March On Washington are talking about voting this election cycle.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Juana Summers, campaign correspond...

Trump Is Following His 2016 Roadmap. Does It Matter That The Electorate Has Changed?
Protests continue after police in Kenosha, Wisconsin shot Jacob Blake repeatedly in the back on Sunday. A young white man is said to have murdered two demonstrators on Tuesday. What do continuing racial justice demonstrations and sporadic violence mean for Trump and Biden?And, a new report shows how the demographics of eligible voters have changed since Trump's 2016 win. What does that mean for his path to re-election?Sign up for our newsletter.Today's episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White...

'We're Here And They're Not': Amid Pandemic And Recession, Trump Touts Achievements
President Trump accepted the nomination for a second term onstage at the White House, in front of 1500 people — where the was little social distancing and few masks. The president touted accomplishments and unleashed harsh, often misleading, attacks on Joe Biden who Trump said would destroy "American Greatness."Read our recap. Subscribe to our newsletter.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national polit...


Pence: Trump Won't Stay Silent When 'Our Heritage Is Demeaned Or Insulted'
Mike Pence formally accepted the vice presidential nomination on the third night of the Republican National Convention. As racial justice protests continue across the country after a shooting in Wisconsin, Pence touted Trump as a president who stands up for "our heritage."Read our recap of the night. Sign up for the newsletter.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron El...

Trump Leverages Presidential Power To Juice Convention TV
Melania Trump gave her Republican National Convention address from the Rose Garden of "the people's house." Campaign videographers were there as Donald Trump issued a presidential pardon and presided over a citizenship ceremony, relying on the constitutional powers of his office to generate slick videos for his re-election effort. It was unprecedented.Catch up on all that happened with our live blog. Subscribe to the newsletter.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent...

Trump, Or Else: Speakers Laud President As 'Bodyguard Of Western Civilization'
President Trump and his allies portrayed Democrats as "radical" and decried "cancel culture." The first night of the Republican National Convention attempted to rewrite history on the pandemic response while softening Trump's image with stories of compassion and empathy. Overall, though, the night felt gloomy, highlighting a key point of agreement with Democrats: the stakes of this election are existential.Want more? We summed it all up here. And we'll have fresh analysis in our newsletter.This episode: cam...


What To Know About The Republican National Convention
President Trump and the Republican party will lay out their vision for Trump's re-election all week. The NPR Politics Podcast breaks down what to watch and listen for. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Find and support your local public radio station....

Weekly Roundup: August 21st
The head of the United States Postal Service testified before the Senate today about controversial changes that good governance watchdogs say undermine election infrastructure. Louis DeJoy denied he was responsible for most changes, that he now says won't be implemented until after the election.Steve Bannon, who oversaw President Trump's 2016 election effort, was arrested on fraud charges tied to a $27 million "build the wall" crowd-funding effort. And bipartisan Senate investigators released a final repo...

'An Ally Of The Light': Joe Biden Pledges Return To Hope And Compassion
Joe Biden has accepted the Democratic party's presidential nomination. In his acceptance speech, closing out the convention's final night, he pledged to be a president for all Americans.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Find...


Historic: Kamala Harris Accepts Vice Presidential Nomination
Kamala Harris, in her speech on the third night of the Democratic National Convention, accepted the vice presidential nomination with a nod to her mother and tied the death toll of the pandemic to structural racism.Barack Obama attacked Trump directly, fretting about the impact another term could have on democracy in the United States. Hillary Clinton called for a landslide win for Biden.Want more? We summed it all up here. And we'll have fresh analysis in our newsletter.This episode: White House correspon...

Presumptive No Longer: Joe Biden Named Democratic Presidential Nominee
The Democratic National Convention's second night featured speeches from Colin Powell, Bill Clinton, Jill Biden, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — another eclectic political mix designed to bolster Joe Biden's credentials as a unifier. Activist Ady Barkan gave a speech about his struggle with ALS that laid bare how central health care and health coverage are to the Democratic political brand, despite intraparty differences.Read a recap of the night here. And why not? Sign up for our newsletter, too.This episod...

One Upside For Virtual Convention? No Jeers For Controversial Speakers
The Democratic National Convention's second night featured speeches from Colin Powell, Bill Clinton, Jill Biden, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — another eclectic political mix designed to bolster Joe Biden's credentials as a unifier. Activist Ady Barkan gave a speech about his struggle with ALS that laid bare how central health care and health coverage are to the Democratic political brand, despite intraparty differences.Read a recap of the night here. And why not? Sign up for our newsletter, too.This episod...


Not Too Far Left, But Left Enough: Kasich and Sanders Speak On DNC Night One
Those were the dual messages of the first night of the Democratic convention from former Republican governor of Ohio John Kasich and progressive firebrand Sen. Bernie Sanders.There was a heavy focus on the pandemic, including a powerful speech from Kristin Urquiza, the daughter of a Trump supporter who died after contracting the virus.And, Michelle Obama wants people to make a plan about how they'll cast a ballot.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and s...

The DNC Starts Tomorrow. Here's What To Watch For.
Joe Biden, Kamala Harris and others will speak at the mostly-virtual Democratic National Convention. And, will conventions ever be the same?Want more? Sign-up for the NPR Politics Newsletter.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea. Connect:Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR P...

The DNC Starts Tomorrow. Here's What To Watch For.
Joe Biden, Kamala Harris and others will speak at the mostly-virtual Democratic National Convention. And, will conventions ever be the same?Want more? Sign-up for the NPR Politics Newsletter.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea. Connect:Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR P...


Life Kit: How To Vote By Mail
If you're planning to vote this fall, you can probably mail in your ballot instead of voting in person. NPR's Life Kit put together this guide for how to do that....

Weekly Roundup: August 14th
President Trump opposes funding for the U.S. postal service because he believes it will make voting by mail easier. Led by a major donor to the president's campaign, the postal service has made a number of changes that appear likely to slow election results. The president continues to advance baseless fraud allegations, as a new NPR/Marist/NewsHour poll shows him down double-digits to Joe Biden. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, voting reporter Miles Parks, White House reporter Ayesha Rasco...

Trump's Executive Actions Are Less Than Meets The Eye
President Trump announced an executive action last weekend to grant an additional $400 in employment benefits after the White House and Congress failed to strike a deal. But, like the three other pronouncements that came at the same time, it is unclear how the order will be implemented and what the president actually has the power to do.READ: In Executive Actions, Trump Extends Some Unemployment Benefits, Defers Payroll TaxesThis episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Ayesha...


In First Campaign Event, Kamala Harris Prosecutes Trump
Kamala Harris came out swinging, forceful in her critiques of President Trump at her first appearance on the campaign trail since Joe Biden selected her to serve as his running mate. How effective will she be in that role during the campaign? And what will President Trump's attacks look like while running against a woman of color?READ: Harris, As Biden's Running Mate, Says Case Against Trump Is 'Open And Shut'This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and nati...

Why Pick Kamala Harris For Vice President?
Who is Kamala Harris and why did Joe Biden select her to serve as his vice president and running mate? The NPR Politics team sits down to discuss the California senator's record, experience as a prosecutor, and how she might fit into the Biden campaign.READ: - In Historic Pick, Joe Biden Taps Kamala Harris To Be His Running Mate - Who Is Kamala Harris?This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Juana S...

Arizona Voters Discuss Coronavirus, Racial Justice, Election
Who will win Arizona, Trump or Biden? How is the coronavirus being handled in the state? Who is to blame? NPR and Marist College held a virtual focus group with voters of all stripes in this new battleground.READ: Arizona Focus Group Sees Trump's Crime Attack On Biden As 'Far From Reality'This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at npr...


Weekly Roundup: August 7th
Coronavirus stimulus package negotiations are stuck at "no deal." Meanwhile, tens of millions of Americans remain jobless. Trump may accept the nomination at the White House, a violation of norms and maybe laws. And in a rare big interview, Joe Biden talked China and put his foot in his mouth. On Consider This from NPR: Trump signs TikTok Executive Order This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political e...

Weekly Roundup: August 7th
Coronavirus stimulus package negotiations are stuck at "no deal." Meanwhile, tens of millions of Americans remain jobless. Trump may accept the nomination at the White House, a violation of norms and maybe laws. And in a rare big interview, Joe Biden talked China and put his foot in his mouth. On Consider This from NPR: Trump signs TikTok Executive Order This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political e...

Republicans Fear Democrats May Win Senate
Republican strategists worry that the party may not be able to win a Senate majority again, and they almost certainly will not be able to significantly expand their seat total in the chamber. And in the House, a historic seven incumbents have lost their primary races. What's behind the wave?READ: Senate Republicans Face Uphill Fight To Hold MajorityThis episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to...


Different Approaches, Same Pain: Georgia And California Struggle To Curb Covid-19
As Congress stagnates on aid and Biden's convention duties go virtual, states are feeling the pain of the coronavirus. More than 150 thousand Americans have died and that number is growing by more than a thousand a day.In Georgia, schools are reopening — many in person. In California, disagreements abound about the best path forward. And, what will the election look like under these conditions?This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Kelsey Snell, Scott Shafer of KQED, and Em...

Trump's TikTok Trepidation Troubles Teens
President Trump said Monday that TikTok will close Sept. 15 unless it's bought by an American company. Microsoft is in discussions with TikTok parent company ByteDance over a possible purchase. It is the latest example of U.S. tensions with China manifesting as fights over technology.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and technology reporter Bobby Allyn.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the N...

Trump's TikTok Trepidation Troubles Teens
President Trump said Monday that TikTok will close Sept. 15 unless it's bought by an American company. Microsoft is in discussions with TikTok parent company ByteDance over a possible purchase. It is the latest example of U.S. tensions with China manifesting as fights over technology.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and technology reporter Bobby Allyn.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the N...


The 2020 Battleground Map—With 90 Days Left.
NPR's 2020 Battleground MapThe latest NPR analysis of the Electoral College has several states shifting in Biden's favor, and he now has a 297-170 advantage over Trump with exactly three months to go until Election Day. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen ...

Weekly Roundup: July 31st
The country's worst-ever GDP report mirrors common sense: the economic retracted dramatically when the pandemic put life on hold. And the president's mail-in voting conspiracy theories are misleading and undermine conference in election integrity.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, economics correspondent Scott Horsley, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Note: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google all provide financial support to NPR.Connect:Subscribe to ...

Weekly Roundup: July 31st
The country's worst-ever GDP report mirrors common sense: the economic retracted dramatically when the pandemic put life on hold. And the president's mail-in voting conspiracy theories are misleading and undermine conference in election integrity.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, economics correspondent Scott Horsley, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Note: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google all provide financial support to NPR.Connect:Subscribe to ...


Trump Suggests Unprecedented Election Delay. Congress Isn't Interested.
The president tweeted the proposal just after a report showed the U.S. economy shrank by one-third, the worst contraction in history. Legally, rescheduling the election would require changing a law that dates back to 1845.And, Asma Khalid reports from Duval County in Florida, which could support a Democratic presidential nominee for the first time since Jimmy Carter.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:...

Trump Suggests Unprecedented Election Delay. Congress Isn't Interested.
The president tweeted the proposal just after a report showed the U.S. economy shrank by one-third, the worst contraction in history. Legally, rescheduling the election would require changing a law that dates back to 1845.And, Asma Khalid reports from Duval County in Florida, which could support a Democratic presidential nominee for the first time since Jimmy Carter.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:...

Who Will Joe Biden Pick As His Running Mate?
NPR has profiled a series of women thought to be under consideration to serve as Joe Biden's running mate. They include Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Tammy Duckworth, Karen Bass, and Susan Rice.You can find all of our profiles here.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and campaign correspondent Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to ou...


Who Will Joe Biden Pick As His Running Mate?
NPR has profiled a series of women thought to be under consideration to serve as Joe Biden's running mate. They include Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Tammy Duckworth, Karen Bass, and Susan Rice.You can find all of our profiles here.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and campaign correspondent Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to ou...

Can The GOP Unite Behind Their Coronavirus Plan?
The Senate Majority Leader has announced what is nominally the Republican proposal for the next phase of coronavirus relief, but members of his own party are feeling uncertain about the cost. The plan also includes money for a new FBI headquarters in downtown DC, a priority for the president that lacks wide support in Congress.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast he...

Can The GOP Unite Behind Their Coronavirus Plan?
The Senate Majority Leader has announced what is nominally the Republican proposal for the next phase of coronavirus relief, but members of his own party are feeling uncertain about the cost. The plan also includes money for a new FBI headquarters in downtown DC, a priority for the president that lacks wide support in Congress.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast he...


There Are Fewer Than 100 Days Left Till Election Day. Here's The State Of The Race.
Joe Biden leads in national polls by a large margin and Trump's approval ratings on key issues are sliding. Despite a term filled with scandals, from the Mueller investigation to impeachment, the president's reelection bid is defined by the pandemic. But a surprising amount can happen in a hundred days.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Em...

Weekly Roundup: July 24th, 2020
President Trump announced yesterday that much of the Republican National Convention would be cancelled because of coronavirus concerns. School reopening continues to be a major concern for parents, most of whom want to see their kids return to the classroom but worry that it can't be done safely. And Republicans find themselves divided over what to include in their coronavirus aid proposal.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, education correspondent ...

After Crackdown In Portland, Trump And Barr Tout Federal Police
Federal police have been militant in their response to protests in Portland, including detaining people in unmarked vans. In the wake of that controversy, President Trump and his attorney general are touting an increased role for federal officers in combating systemic violence issues elsewhere in the country.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here....


Trump Wants To Change Who Counts When Dividing Up Seats In Congress
President Trump gave a more sober briefing about the coronavirus Tuesday evening, though it still contained inaccuracies. He said, months into the pandemic, that the White House is working on a strategy. And President Trump released a memorandum Tuesday that calls for the exclusion of unauthorized immigrants from the numbers used to divide up seats in Congress among the states.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, senior political editor and correspon...

Is The Suburban Swing To Biden A Political Realignment?
Joe Biden is winning in the suburbs. They were key to Democrats' winning the House in the 2018 midterms. But suburban voters were once a key part of the GOP coalition. Is the shift indicative of a bigger political realignment?This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to ou...

Congress To Work On Pandemic Relief
Lawmakers return to Capitol Hill this week with plans to tackle a long-awaited pandemic relief package. And a majority of Americans don't trust the president for information about the coronavirus. The White House says it plans to return to daily briefings anyway.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Po...


Weekly Roundup: July 17th
Congress has a lot it wants to take on when lawmakers return to Washington next week—police reform, Confederate names on military bases, and coronavirus relief. How likely are they to get any of it done? And the president has asked a new international development agency tasked with countering China to expand its responsibilities to include the US emergency stockpile of personal protective equipment. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, election security...

GOP Hoped To Diversify. Then Came President Trump.
A report from Republicans after Mitt Romney's loss called for the party to diversify its base. Instead, President Trump won. Now what?This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and...

Polls Show Biden Riding High. Democrats Are Still Worried.
Joe Biden is doing well in the polls: in traditional Democratic strongholds, in swing states, and even in historically Republican bastions. But Democratic strategists and voters both feel worried that there is something the polls are missing.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen...


Trump Fights Fauci. Nearly 140,000 Americans Are Dead.
The U.S. continues to break its record daily high of new coronavirus cases. The White House has begun to openly criticize the country's most visible public health expert: Anthony Fauci.And an NPR investigation has found that some 65,000 votes were invalidated because of hang-ups with mail-in voting. As more Americans plan to vote by mail in November, such hangups could have huge consequences.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspo...

Trump Uses His Office To Help A Friend
President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of Roger Stone. Stone was convicted by a jury of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. The move has prompted outcry from Democrats, Mitt Romney, and Robert Mueller.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NP...

Weekly Roundup: July 10th, 2020
Joe Biden has received detailed policy proposals from the joint committees he formed with Bernie Sanders, part of an effort to bring progressives into his campaign's fold. But, with Biden up by double-digits over President Trump, progressive votes seem less essential to his path to victory. And, he's released a new economic policy plan he calls "Build Back Better," an explicit counter to President Trump's economical nationalism.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondent...


Absolute Immunity? Presidents Don't Have It.
The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected President Trump's claim that he is "categorically immune" from having his pre-presidential financial records investigated by a New York grand jury. But in a second decision on the House's request for similar information, the court questioned the breadth of congressional authority. Americans, almost certainly, will not see the president's taxes before Election Day.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national justice co...

Is It Safe For Kids To Return To School?
The President is insistent: kids must return to school in the fall. But its not his decision to make and school districts are struggling to figure out how to open safely. Also, the Supreme Court allows more exceptions to contraception coverage. The last day of the Court's term is tomorrow.This episode: reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, education correspondent Cory Turner, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national correspondent Sarah McCammon.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the ...

Young People Drive Coronavirus Surge
The US is now regularly seeing days with more than 50,000 new cases of the coronavirus, up from the previous peak of 30 thousand a day in April. Florida is among the states hardest hit by the uptick.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, science correspondent Allison Aubrey, and national correspondent Greg Allen.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected]


President Revives "American Carnage" Message
In a speech Friday at Mount Rushmore, President Trump returned to the divisive "law and order" rhetoric and white identity politics that fueled his 2016 campaign. That's despite signs that the message is not as resonant this election cycle.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House reporters Ayesha Rascoe and Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist Th...

How Black Americans Experience Patriotism
The U.S. is experiencing a reckoning over the fact that the promises of America are not fulfilled equally. Black Americans share how they experience patriotism ahead of the July Fourth celebration. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist, The NPR Politics Daily Workou...

US Added Jobs In June⁠—But Now The Pandemic Is Getting Worse
The unemployment rate fell to 11.1%. But there are indications that the job growth has slowed recently amid a surge of new coronavirus infections. Follow our playlist, The NPR Politics Daily Workout.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and...


Trump Remakes Federal Judiciary In His Image
In June, the Senate confirmed President Trump's 200th judge to the bench. With a dearth of legislative achievements to point to, reshaping the federal judiciary could be the president's most durable legacy.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our ...

Trump's Disapproval Climbs Alongside US Coronavirus Cases
Amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases, the number of voters disapproving of the job President Trump is doing is at an all-time high, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Joe Biden is using the pandemic to attack the president. And despite a narrow loss in the Kentucky Senate primary, the progressive wing of the Democratic party is amassing power in the halls of Congress.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and co...

Supreme Court Overturns Restrictions On Abortion Access
Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals, citing the Supreme Court's adherence to precedent, to invalidate a Louisiana law that required doctors at clinics that perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Plus, lawmakers in both parties are asking for more information after press reports suggested that Russian operatives have paid Afghan insurgents to target U.S. forces. This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell correspondent Sarah McCammon, national ...


Weekly Roundup: June 26th, 2020
At the first coronavirus taskforce briefing in months, Vice President Mike Pence reiterated that the White House was there to support states in their response to the pandemic and touted the administration's response so far despite the country's high death toll. And Attorney General William Barr talks to NPR about the pile of controversies facing the Department of Justice.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson,...

Congress Probably Won't Agree On Police Reform
A day after Democrats blocked a Republican proposal in the Senate, they are set to pass a reform plan of their own in the House. Lawmakers appear pessimistic about the chances of compromise legislation.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter...

U.S. Coronavirus Cases Holding Steady
The United States isn't experiencing a second wave of the coronavirus—because the first wave never ended. While original hotspots of the outbreak, like New York and New Jersey, have seen declines, population centers in the south, including Texas, are seeing record numbers of cases. White House coronavirus task force member Anthony Fauci testified about the pandemic yesterday on Capitol Hill.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, science correspondent ...


Who Will Kentucky Pick To Face Mitch McConnell?
Closely-watched congressional primaries in New York and Kentucky will test how well progressives fare in two very different parts of the country. And reporting from a Michigan suburb on how folks there view the racial justice protests and the president's response to the pandemic.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Kentucky Public Radio reporter Ryland Barton, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.E...

Trump Fires Lawyer Who Prosecuted His Allies
President Trump has removed a top Justice Department official, Geoffrey Berman, whose office has overseen the prosecutions of several of the president's associates. And the president's Saturday rally was a return to form for Trump, but fell short of expectations set by his campaign.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Emai...

Weekly Roundup: June 19th, 2020
In Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday, President Trump will hold his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic seized the United States. The top public health official there said he hoped it would be delayed and the campaign agreed to limited public health precautions. And, new allegations from a former national security adviser draw White House ire.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Su...


In 5-4 Decision, Supreme Court Lets DACA Stand
The Supreme Court has extended a life-support line to some 650,000 so-called "Dreamers" on Thursday, allowing them to remain safe from deportation. In the majority opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts said the decision was not about the Trump administration's authority to end the program, but rather about its "arbitrary" justification.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR P...

NPR Analysis: Biden Has Early Edge On 2020 Political Map
President Trump is in a political hole and has a lot of ground to make up over the next five months if he hopes to win another term, an NPR analysis of the Electoral College map finds. Read the analysis.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the ...

What Trump's Policing Order Does (And Doesn't) Do
President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against people of color.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and congressional reporter Claudia Grisales.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics ...


Supreme Court: LGBTQ Employment Discrimination Is Illegal
The vote was 6-3 with conservatives Chief Justice John Roberts and Neil Gorsuch joining the court's four liberal justices in the majority. "In Title VII, Congress adopted broad language making it illegal for an employer to rely on an employee's sex when deciding to fire that employee," the court held in Monday's decision. "We do not hesitate to recognize today a necessary consequence of that legislative choice: an employer who fires an individual merely for being gay or transgender defies the law."In this ...

It's Been a Minute: 'Not Just Another Protest'
There is so much to unpack in this current moment. Sam has a candid conversation with Aunt Betty about how history has shaped her view of the current protests, and he walks around downtown Los Angeles to get the perspective of people he meets. Sam also talks to BuzzFeed News reporter Melissa Segura on her recent reporting about police unions and what they mean for reform, and Morning Edition executive producer Kenya Young about being a black parent during this time and the 'talk' she has to give her sons.NP...

The Ground Is Shifting In Trump's Culture War
President Trump and his campaign are sticking to culture war messaging even as some congressional Republicans cede ground on police reform as an increasing majority of Americans voice their support for the protests.This episode: campaign correspondents Asma Khalid and Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Gr...


The End Of Police In Minneapolis
After one of the city's police officers killed George Floyd, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis city council has pledged to disband the city's police force. What comes next could take years to figure out.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, reporter Adrian Florido, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Fi...

"Is that what a black man's worth? Twenty dollars?"
Philonise Floyd, whose brother was killed by Minneapolis police, testified in front of the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. The hearing, tied to House Democrats' police reform proposal, took place as Republican reform efforts in the Senate began to take shape.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and National Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Po...

President Trump Denies Systemic Racism In Policing. Most Americans Disagree.
As Joe Biden's campaign touted his plans for police reform, President Trump denied that there is a systemic problem with American policing; according to polls, a large majority of Americans disagree. And Republicans have controlled Georgia politics for nearly two decades. Tuesday's primary in the state could be the beginning of a shift in power.This episode: campaign correspondents Asma Khalid and Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and WABE reporter Emma Hurt.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR ...


Democrats Want To Reform, Not Defund, Police
Congressional Democrats on Monday unveiled the Justice in Policing Act of 2020, which aims to install wide-ranging reforms for police departments across the country. It faces Republican opposition. Responding to a mantra of nationwide anti-racism protests, Joe Biden's campaign announced he doesn't support defunding police departments. Reform activists say their ask is more nuanced than that.In this episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and congressional corres...

Weekly Roundup: June 5th, 2020
As the country erupts in protests over police brutality and racism, two-thirds of Americans think President Trump has increased racial tensions. That poll comes as news that 2.5 million American jobs were added in May as Trump encourages the country to reopen. Plus, a look at the type of leadership Americans want in this moment.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to ...

View from the Ground At Washington DC Protests; Misinformation Spreads Online
Since the White House has increased its military in the nation's capital, more protesters are gathering by the day. The protests continue to remain largely peaceful despite the Trump administration's focus on violence. Plus, misinformation is spreading quickly as more people are turning to social media to understand what's happening on the ground.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Alan Wise, political reporter Miles Parks, and investigations reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscr...


Congress Searches For How To Respond To Calls From Protesters
Despite curfews imposed across the country, protesters continue to gather to demand action after the death of George Floyd. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called on the the Congressional Black Caucus to draft legislation while President Trump continues to focus on quelling the protests.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected]

'He Thinks Division Helps Him': Biden Condemns Trump's Protest Response
Former Vice President Joe Biden condemned both police violence and President Trump's increasingly confrontational response to widespread unrest in a Tuesday morning speech delivered at Philadelphia City Hall. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign reporter Juana Summers, and senior political ediotr and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR...

Trump Threatens To Deploy Military To States If They Don't Stop Violent Protests
Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them." This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected]


Trump Encourages Governors To 'Dominate' Protesters, Blames Democrats For Unrest
President Trump on Monday called governors weak and urged them to "dominate" to prevent further violent demonstrations following the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis who died after a white police officer kneeled on his neck. Plus former Vice President Joe Biden meets with black leaders and is encouraged to listen to younger African-Americans.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscr...

Weekly Roundup: May 29th, 2020
President Trump responded to violent protests days after the killing of a black man. He said he will send in the National Guard, adding: "When the looting starts, the shooting starts." Joe Biden called on the nation to better empathize with the pain of black Americans in the wake of the death of the black man by a white police officer.Plus, the death toll from the coronavirus pandemic reaches a 100,000 milestone. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, camp...

The Death Of George Floyd Sparks Outrage From Both Sides Of The Aisle
The Justice Department says it has made the investigation into George Floyd's death "a top priority," after furor over a video depicting a white police officer kneeling on his neck spilled over into widespread protests for a second night. Both Democrats and Republicans called Floyd's death a tragedy. But what action could come from it?This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast h...


Twitter Adds Warning To Trump's Tweets As He Spreads Misinformation
Twitter has placed a fact-checking warning on a pair of tweets issued by President Trump in which he claims without evidence that mail-in ballots are fraudulent. The label comes in the middle of a series of tweets from the president touting a conspiracy theory.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast F...

Trump Threatens To Move The Republican National Convention
President Trump has threatened to relocate the Republican National Convention, which has been scheduled to take place in Charlotte, N.C., in August. He is objecting to the governor's safety measures.Meanwhile Democrats weigh options for how they may host their own convention.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Po...

Republicans And Democrats Battle Over The Future Of Voting
The coronavirus has reshaped how voting may happen for the 2020 elections, and Democrats and Republicans are battling in courts across the country trying to get the upper hand in November. But because the landscape has changed so quickly, neither party is sure what exactly gives them an advantage.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Miles Parks, and correspondent Pam Fessler.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the ...


Weekly Roundup: May 22nd, 2020
In an at-times tense exchange on the radio show Breakfast Club, former Vice President Joe Biden said, "If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you ain't black." The comments drew widespread criticism.Plus, China moves to exert more control over Hong Kong causing more tension with the United States.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, reporter Juana Summers, editor & correspondent Ron Elving, Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and chief economic corresp...

Trump And Biden Wage An Uneven Virtual Campaign
The president with a major social media presence is facing a Democratic challenger with fewer digital resources. Biden's strategy counts on real-world conditions overcoming Trump's virtual dominance. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Fi...

Democrats Think Prioritizing Health Care Will Give Them Wins In 2020
Hoping to build on the party's success in 2018, the Democratic Party will take aim at federal challengers who want to repeal Obamacare and state candidates who resist Medicare expansion. Plus, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that two-thirds of Americans do not expect their daily lives to return to normal for at least six months.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subs...


Senators Clash Over How Soon To Reopen The Economy
Members of the Senate Banking Committee squabbled Tuesday over how quickly the U.S. economy can rebound from the coronavirus shutdown and whether the federal government is doing enough to support struggling families and businesses in the meantime. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley....

Democrats Launch Probe Into Trump's Firing Of State Department Inspector General
Congressional Democrats announced Saturday they're requesting all records and documents regarding President Trump's decision to fire State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, the fourth government watchdog Trump has fired or sought to remove in the last six weeks. Plus, former President Obama addresses 2020 graduates and says the United States lacks the leadership to fight the pandemic. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political co...

Weekly Roundup: May 15th, 2020
In this week's roundup: Senator Richard Burr, Republican of North Carolina, had his cell phone seized by the FBI as they investigate his stock trades in the weeks before the coronavirus pandemic gathered steam in the U.S. And, what will the Supreme Court say about the limits on a president's ability to forestall investigations into his conduct?This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and chief legal affairs c...


Ousted Scientist Warns Government Response Risks American Lives
Career government scientist Rick Bright testified that he was pushed out as the head of a government medical research agency after pushing back against higher-ups over an under-researched coronavirus treatment touted by the president. Bright says raised alarms about critical supply shortages early on in the pandemic. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, science correspondent Allison Aubrey. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the sho...

House Democrats Push For Money For States In New Relief Bill
House Democrats plan to move forward with a $3 trillion bill for additional coronavirus relief, following up on the historic $2 trillion aid package passed in March. It prioritizes granting hazard pay to front-line workers and providing aid to state and local governments, which had not been allotted in previous bills. It is seen as an opening salvo in a long series of negotiations on the next relief package.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and national po...

Nation's Top Health Officials Testify
Public health needs continue to stymie lawmakers' hopes for an immediate economic reopening. The nation's top health experts appeared — virtually — before a Senate committee today and provided updates on coronavirus testing and the state of the outbreak.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and science correspondent Richard Harris.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Faceboo...


Fauci In "Modified Quarantine"; CA Special Election Has Lessons For November
After coming into contact with a White House staff member who tested positive for the coronavirus, Anthony Fauci and two other top officials from the White House taskforce are self-quarantining. And the special election in California's 25th congressional district illustrates the challenges social distancing will pose to congressional campaigns ahead of the general election.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and...

Weekly Roundup: May 8th, 2020
After months of wrangling following the Russia probe, prosecutors will not go ahead with the case against Michael Flynn based on the former national security adviser's false statements to the FBI. And U.S. employers shed a record number of jobs in April, as the unemployment rate climbed to the highest since the Great Depression.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:...

Supreme Court Firsts: Teleconferences, Livestreams, And A Toilet Flush
The Supreme Court resumed oral arguments this week after a lengthy hiatus because of the pandemic. The high court heard arguments via teleconference, a process that was (mostly) without hiccups. Remote arguments continue next week.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and chief legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at [email protected] the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Grou...


Partisan Divide: Michigan, Texas Take Differing Approaches To Reopening
As new confirmed cases decline in the state, Michigan has extended its stay-at-home order until May 15th. Texas is moving quickly toward reopening, and while the state's outbreak is comparatively less severe, it isn't tapering off. That has led some public health experts to worry that lifting restrictions could mean a spike in cases.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, WKAR reporter Abigail Censky, KUT reporter Ashley Lopez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at np...