The World of Business

The World of Business Podcast

Insights into the business world - featuring content from BBC Radio 4's In Business programme, and also Global Business from the BBC World Service.

Indonesia’s new capital
Indonesia’s capital Jakarta is sinking, and struggling with traffic and pollution. The government’s solution? To build a new capital on the island of Borneo instead, better known for its jungles and orangutans. How will this work? Former BBC Indonesia correspondent Rebecca Henschke travels to the proposed new capital site and meets families, environmental campaigners, and local indigenous people to find out how they feel about being included in the proposed new capital territory. Can the indigenous villager...

Making fashion sustainable
Fashion is a hugely polluting industry and is under enormous pressure to become more sustainable. From the way cotton is grown, to the use of synthetic materials and the conditions in factories where our clothes are made - these are all challenges facing the sector. In this programme Patrick Grant, the British menswear designer, factory owner and judge on the Great British Sewing Bee, asks how the fashion industry should respond and what we, as consumers, should be doing too. Presenter: Patrick Grant Prod...

Hydrogen: The answer to Climate Change?
Hydrogen is a volatile gas with an image problem, but hydrogen evangelists think this could be the ‘magic molecule’ which will solve the world’s air pollution and cut carbon emissions dramatically. Manuela Saragosa presents the final part of this special series on energy from Italy, where hydrogen has been pumped into the existing gas network. Could a hydrogen boat replace the diesel belching cruise liners and ships along the canals of Venice? Presenter: Manuela Saragosa Producer: Nina Robinson Photo Cr...


Is the UK up for sale?
Jaguar Land Rover, Cadbury, Weetabix are but some of the many British brands now owned by foreign corporations. The UK has one of the highest rates of company takeovers by new overseas owners. Sometimes these deals rescue a struggling business and save jobs. And sometimes they provide welcome investment for fast growth. But is there also the risk of Britain suffering a permanent loss of technology and know-how, or even a threat to national security, such as when the company targeted for takeover is in the d...

Australia’s Coalface
Australia is stubbornly sticking to providing much of its power through coal. While many countries around the world are eschewing fossil fuels, (because of their environmental impact), the Australian government continues to give the all-clear to new coal mines, including one called the Carmichael mine. It’s being constructed by the Indian company, Adani. Much of the coal it produces will be exported to Asia. The mine was an issue in the country’s 2019 general election, and has been the site of many prot...

Zimbabwe's Food Crisis: Can Old Crops Fix New Problems?
Every day people dig into sadza, a maize based meal, but there’s a problem. Zimbabwe’s getting much drier and maize can’t cope. Crop failures have partly contributed to food shortages this year leading to more than 7 million people needing food aid. The economic crisis has made the situation more serious and things will only get worse as the climate heats up. How can Zimbabwe feed itself? It turns out grains like millet and sorghum could hold the key. Unlike maize, these small grains are indigenous to the r...


Germany’s Energy Transition
Germany has long been considered a leader in renewable energy – a model even for others to follow with its subsidies for wind and solar. Householders were encouraged to put solar panels on their rooves as early as two decades ago. But its so-called “Energiewende” or “energy transition” from fossil fuels to renewables is facing challenges and the country still relies on coal for 30 per cent of electricity generation. That will be phased out within the next eighteen years and nuclear energy will end too by 2...

Selling Britain
Whatever happens in British politics, Britain's reputation has changed. What does this mean for its global business image? Chris Bowlby discovers what's ahead for Brand Britain....

Clean Cooking in Rwanda
More than seventy percent of households in Rwanda cook over wooden and charcoal fires. This means women often sit for hours every day in smoky conditions which can damage their health, increasing the risk of respiratory infections, heart disease, strokes and lung cancer. These traditional cooking methods are also the cause of widespread deforestation. The Rwandan government is aiming to halve the number of people using these cooking fuels in the next six years. They're investing in infrastructure and offeri...


The Business of Beethoven
"Beethoven's arms were bigger than the piano" says concert pianist Stephen Hough at his Steinway. "I sense him pushing at every moment - as if he's in a cage saying 'Let me out'". To mark the 250th anniversary of the composer's birth in 2020, Clemmie Burton-Hill looks, not at Beethoven the composer, but at a little-known aspect of the composer's life, Beethoven the entrepreneur. In the company of some of the foremost Beethoven proponents - pianist Stephen Hough, violinists Anne-Sophie Mutter and Daniel Hope...

The pub is dead! Long live the micropub!
Since 2001 the UK has lost a quarter of its pubs. They've shut their doors for good. High taxes, high prices, supermarket competition, even the smoking ban have all been blamed. But there are new types of pub, the micropub, and community-owned pubs, which are bucking the trend. While larger, traditional establishments have been under pressure, these have flourished. So why have they been able to succeed where others have not? For In Business, John Murphy visits his local boozer - and others - to see what th...

Keeping the Lights On
As Britain’s sources of electricity change, along with significant changes in demand, how will the lights stay on? The major power blackout that hit the UK in early August – the worst in more than a decade – was an indication of how increasingly complicated our electricity grid is becoming. Hundreds of thousands of people, as well as major transport hubs, were affected as electricity supplies were cut to restore balance to the system and prevent an even greater blackout. The National Grid, which is the ener...


What is the value of women’s work?
Iceland has taken radical measures to reduce its gender pay gap. These aren't just about equalising pay when men and women do the same job but when they do different jobs of equal value. That's proved to be quite a sticking point in many countries around the world; ensuring that the jobs routinely occupied by women are paid as well as those that men do. Lesley Curwen meets the people tasked with comparing a production line worker with an office administrator, an HR professional with an accountant and a came...

What is the value of women’s work?
Iceland has taken radical measures to reduce its gender pay gap. These aren't just about equalising pay when men and women do the same job but when they do different jobs of equal value. That's proved to be quite a sticking point in many countries around the world; ensuring that the jobs routinely occupied by women are paid as well as those that men do. Lesley Curwen meets the people tasked with comparing a production line worker with an office administrator, an HR professional with an accountant and a came...

Belarus: Harvesting the whirlwind
The irradiated lands around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor were large, prosperous, and lively collective farms until the reactor exploded in 1986. Seventy percent of the toxic radiation fell in Belarus – a small, agrarian country in which most people lived on the land. Hundreds of villages were evacuated, but much of the population has since returned. A generation later Global Business visits the Belarussian contamination zone and its hinterland to see how the local economy and way of life has adapted to a w...


Belarus: Harvesting the whirlwind
The irradiated lands around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor were large, prosperous, and lively collective farms until the reactor exploded in 1986. Seventy percent of the toxic radiation fell in Belarus – a small, agrarian country in which most people lived on the land. Hundreds of villages were evacuated, but much of the population has since returned. A generation later Global Business visits the Belarussian contamination zone and its hinterland to see how the local economy and way of life has adapted to a w...

Can Liberian rubber bounce back?
A victim of the “resource curse”, Liberia is one of the poorest countries in the world, in spite of being rich in natural resources. Rubber is one of the country’s biggest exports but few Liberians have benefitted from this multimillion dollar business. In this Global Business, Josephine Casserly meets a retired Californian policeman, James Cooper, who has returned to his grandfather’s farm, determined to revolutionise Liberia’s rubber industry. But in a country with a struggling economy and endemic corrupt...

Can Liberian rubber bounce back?
A victim of the “resource curse”, Liberia is one of the poorest countries in the world, in spite of being rich in natural resources. Rubber is one of the country’s biggest exports but few Liberians have benefitted from this multimillion dollar business. In this Global Business, Josephine Casserly meets a retired Californian policeman, James Cooper, who has returned to his grandfather’s farm, determined to revolutionise Liberia’s rubber industry. But in a country with a struggling economy and endemic corrupt...


How Politics Broke up with Business
Why have politicians gone from cosying up to businesses, to turning a deaf ear to their concerns? Jeremy Schwartz – a CEO himself – finds that the love affair was starting to become toxic long before Brexit, and asks whether it’s really such a bad thing if governments no longer care what business leaders think. Contributors include: Andrea Leadsom – Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Frances O’Grady – General Secretary, TUC Iain Anderson - Executive Chairman, Cicero Giles Wil...

Flying Green
Flying, for many of us, is now routine. For a few of us it is a weekly, maybe even daily, event. At the same time global protests, concerned with the pressing danger of climate change and the need to reduce CO2 emissions, are gaining attention and causing alarm. So, will we ever get to a point where we can indulge our flying habit and our keep our conscience clear? Katie Prescott talks to the flight refuseniks and assesses the impact they are having. Is the long term solution to change minds or can techno...

The Business of Clicks
Online retail spending has increased more than four fold in the last ten years - it now accounts for almost one in five pounds we spend shopping. But whilst times are tough for our high streets, e-retailing is far from a licence to print money. With widespread discounting and a growing cost of delivery and returns, margins are being squeezed and many are finding it a struggle to survive. In this programme, Adam Shaw investigates how the economics of e-commerce work, what the move to predominantly online ...


India’s fashion industry
India has emerged as one of the world’s fastest-growing fashion markets and is expected to touch $60 billion by 2022, which will make it the sixth largest in the world. This is due to its rapidly growing middle class and tech savvy consumers, who are buying online, as well as from a plethora of shopping malls which have mushroomed in the country’s bigger cities. International brands are trying to step in and take a share of this demand – some 300 of them are planning to open stores in India within the next ...

Managing Volunteers: Free and Easy?
Twenty million Brits give their time for free each year. From the National Trust to the hospice coffee morning, the Samaritans to the local football club, huge parts of our world rely on volunteers. But how easy is it to manage a workforce who can walk out at a moment's notice? How can you ensure people perform well - or even turn up - without the "carrot and stick" of pay and disciplinary procedures? Presenter Claire Bolderson knows both sides of this: she volunteers at a food bank, but also chairs the...

Managing Volunteers: Free and Easy?
Twenty million Brits give their time for free each year. From the National Trust to the hospice coffee morning, the Samaritans to the local football club, huge parts of our world rely on volunteers. But how easy is it to manage a workforce who can walk out at a moment's notice? How can you ensure people perform well - or even turn up - without the "carrot and stick" of pay and disciplinary procedures? Presenter Claire Bolderson knows both sides of this: she volunteers at a food bank, but also chairs the...


Berries Galore!
Strawberries at Christmas? No problem! And as cheap as ever? Yes, of course! Many of us have become used to buying whatever fruit and vegetables we want, whenever we want, no matter the season. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries are available in supermarkets all year round. Until recently that was not the case. So what does it take for this to happen and what’s the cost? John Murphy peels back the layers of the berry industry, which has grown massively in recent years. Despite increasin...

Who are Huawei?
Chinese technology company, Huawei, is the world’s biggest supplier of network telecoms equipment, and with a research budget of up to $20 billion, its ambition is to be even bigger still. However, it’s also one of the most controversial businesses of our time. The United States and others have banned its involvement in their critical infrastructure, fearing that Beijing might use the company to spy, steal trade secrets, or even wage cyber warfare. Huawei insists that its networks are as secure as anyone el...

Business Making an Impact
Climate-change scientists have warned that the clock is ticking, environmental campaigners are blocking the streets, but until now the world of business has kept itself out of the fray. That is changing. From multi-billion dollar investors, to leaders of international companies, to banking bosses, the call is going out for business to take more responsibility for the way the world runs, and the way businesses run themselves. And it’s not just their environmental impact that’s coming under scrutiny. Inequali...


The Berlin Airport Fiasco
One thing Germany does well, you might assume, is infrastructure and transport. Think again. For Global Business on the BBC World Service, Chris Bowlby’s had a rare behind the scenes tour of Berlin’s new airport. It’s billions over budget, already seven years late in opening, and is still being rebuilt before a single plane’s landed. So what’s gone so wrong in a place supposed to be the capital of efficient engineering? And is the Berlin airport fiasco a warning for infrastructure builders everywhere? Pres...

Plastic Backlash: The Business Response
The last eighteen months have seen a global public backlash against plastic. Everyone talks about the huge impact that Sir David Attenborough and the BBC's Blue Planet series has had in raising public awareness about the damage that 8 million tonnes of plastic which enter the ocean every year is having on sea life. It was one of the triggers for consumers, governments and companies to decide that action needed to be taken. But what does it mean for businesses which depend on plastic as a core raw material o...

Guyana: Getting Rich Quick
Guyana, a country of just 750,000 people wedged between Venezuela and Suriname on the north-east coast of South America, has never had an oil industry. But a series of recent discoveries in its waters has revealed billions of barrels of oil beneath the ocean, potentially one of the world’s biggest reserves. Next year, the oil is due to start flowing and the impact on business is already being felt. A shoreside oil service industry has popped up; workers who previously struggled to get by are finding stabl...


Getting Hired
The face-to-face interview can be life-changing. But it comes with risks attached, of bias on the part of the interviewer, or nerves on the part of the candidate. Lesley Curwen looks at the fast-changing process of getting hired in companies, big and small. Large companies are increasingly using recruitment tools including artificial intelligence to weed out the weakest candidates, in order to find the right candidate for the right job. But there is resistance in some quarters from some small employers who ...

Green Shoots: growing food in UAE’s deserts
Can the United Arab Emirates grow its own food? The Desert kingdoms today import 90% of their own food, at great cost. And each year consumption increases by 12%. This raises issues of food security, price and environmental damage – flying in fruit from California is not environmentally sustainable. This is a region with little soil and few water resources. On average it rains just five days a year. So why is agriculture now considered one of the most exciting growth areas in the UAE? Farmers here depend on...

Behind the Facades
The relationship between landlord and tenant is an important, often unseen, dynamic that most of us don’t give much thought to. And yet, it's reshaping high streets up and down the country. High rents are blamed for the collapse of so many retailers - they appear unsustainable yet they are the vehicle through which much of our pension wealth is invested. In this programme, Ruth Alexander looks at different models of ownership: from the big financial institutional investors through to the original aristocrat...


The Irresistible Rise of eSports
Its top stars can earn millions of dollars a year, without breaking into a sweat. They train for hours a day and have legions of fans, who fill stadiums to watch them. But these aren't normal sports stars. They're part of one of the fastest growing industries - known as Esports. And, as John Murphy discovers, the distinction between real physical sport and this online, virtual version is narrowing, as major companies and some of the world's most famous football clubs are signing up the top Esports players t...

A Tale of Two Towns
Much has been made of the death of the high street, but some places are staging a comeback. The government has announced this Spring a £1.6bn Stronger Towns Fund to help less well-off areas. Six hundred million pounds of that will be shared out to towns which can come up with credible plans to help their high street adapt to the rapidly changing retail environment. So what does it take to turn a town around? In this programme, Ruth Alexander visits two towns in Cheshire - Northwich and Altrincham - which ha...

Portugal’s Ocean Economy
As the global economy slows and the search for new areas of growth becomes more intense, many countries are looking beyond their coastline to the vast, untapped potential of the sea. The “Ocean Economy” is now attracting attention from governments, businesses and investors, not only in traditional industries like fishing and shipbuilding but also in new areas like biotech and robotics. Integration is the watchword and one country, Portugal, is now taking this seriously enough that its government has even es...


Light Bulb Moments and How to Have Them
There’s more money spent on innovation today than ever before. Yet the process by which we come up with ideas is still poorly understood. If only we had a better grasp of how great ideas are generated, we would have the key to unlock huge new waves of innovation and productivity. Adam Shaw looks at the growing study of innovation to uncover its secrets and looks at what companies and individuals are doing to make them more innovative than ever before. Presenter: Adam Shaw Producer: Smita Patel Editor: Pe...

Uruguay: the World’s Marijuana Pioneers
Five years after Uruguay became the first country to allow the sale of recreational marijuana, what does a legal cannabis industry look like? When the small South American nation of Uruguay made it legal to grow and buy marijuana for fun, an entire industry had to start from scratch. For producers, regulators, investors, and consumers, it was a blank canvas. Now, as Canada and more and more US states follow in Uruguay’s pioneering footsteps, what can others learn from Uruguay’s approach? And as even more US...

Brexit: Germany Gets Ready
Caroline Bayley reports from Hamburg in Germany on how companies there are preparing for Britain's exit from the European Union. The UK is one of the port city's most important trading partners and one thousand firms in the area have business links with Great Britain. So it's not surprising that there's a flurry of activity in Hamburg in the final weeks before the UK's departure. But how do you plan for Brexit and a new trading scenario which has not yet been finalised? We speak to those who are planning ah...


Hungary’s “Slave” Law
Hungarian politicians have been the focus of protest since they passed what many have called a “slave law” last December. This legislation allows companies to ask their workers to do more overtime – and to delay payment for up to three years. But the government says the law gives businesses flexibility and employees the freedom to work more and earn more. Many think that this legislation is intended to deal with Hungary’s chronic labour shortage. With an aging population, hard-line immigration policies and ...

Koreans in South Africa
The Chinese have long been involved – sometimes controversially - in Africa. But there’s another Asian economic powerhouse that is doing business there. Using South Africa as a springboard, South Koreans are seizing control of some of the key markets on the continent. There are four thousand Koreans living in Johannesburg, creating new businesses and developing established companies. Karen Allen talks to them about some of the challenges they face. Visiting the global electronics giant LG and the car manufa...

Beyond the Barbed Wire - Cyber Security in the UK
Since Bletchley Park and the enigma machine, Britain has been at the forefront of what would become cyber security. In GCHQ we have a world leader in threat detection and yet our industry lags far behind both the US and Israel. Jonty Bloom looks at what we could do to make this Brexit proof industry bigger and finds out why Belfast is at the forefront of the UK’s research and development to keep us safe online. He looks at Unit 8200 the Israeli Army’s elite cyber security unit which has spun off several s...


Potholes - the road to the future
Potholes are a national obsession. But there's much more to them than you might think. Ruth Alexander digs deep into their costs for business and society - where fixing two holes in a motorway can cost half a million pounds. But she also finds all kinds of entrepreneurial imagination going into solving the problem. Everything from new data analysis to 3D printing drones may be the answer. Beneath it all lies a fundamental question. Can we learn to value roads, and maintain them as a vital national asset, sm...

Home Truths
Does the house building industry need to change? Manuela Saragosa meets the disruptors, the companies trying to transform how the vast majority of residential property is built. Across the country new factories are springing up - in a bid to manufacture our homes in much the same way as we do our cars. The risks are huge. Significant investment is required to get things moving and demand for these new homes has yet to be tested. But the disruptors claim that the house building industry must modernise or d...

On the Rails
It’s been a challenging year on Britain’s railways with timetable chaos, over-running engineering works, cancelled trains and irate passengers, not to mention a private operator handing back control to the government. The transport secretary, Chris Grayling has announced yet another review of the industry. Meanwhile, Labour and many of the public want to see rail re-nationalised. Rail professionals point to the industry’s successes – a doubling in passenger numbers since privatisation, and a current strong ...


Selling Sleep
From innovative mattresses to personal sleep consultants, business is moving in on our nights under the covers. The sector is booming, thanks to a new understanding of the importance of sleep, with annual sales in the billions of pounds. And it’s not only our homes that businesses are targeting. In the workplace, managers are becoming more aware of the sleep needs of their teams and some are even installing pods to allow their employees to have a nap on the job. David Baker looks at the products and servic...

The Golden Opportunity
Will life sciences lead Britain towards a new economic future? Brexit's causing uncertainty. But as Ruth Alexander discovers, there's a dynamic 'golden triangle' now linking medical and other cutting edge research at Oxford and Cambridge universities with London's political and financial power. The government's putting this at the centre of its vision for a transformed economy. So what's behind all this, and can this sector live up to the ambition? Producer: Chris Bowlby Editor: Penny Murphy...

The Business of Tutors
Caroline Bayley delves into the booming industry of private tutoring....


Changing Realities
Aleks Krotoski explores new ways that we are watching and listening to content....


The US Media: “Enemies of the people?”
With the media in the United States facing a period of unprecedented challenge - technologically, editorially and politically, Chris Bowlby travels to New York to assess the impact of the huge changes sweeping the industry. Some traditional print titles such as The New York Times are enjoying a "Trump Bump," with its digital offer attracting record subscriptions but how sustainable is this? With billions now using social media to access information and news, how can journalism compete and counter the increa...

Is Tunisia’s Media Freedom in Danger?
Tunisia has seen huge changes in its media industry in the seven years since its revolution and move to democracy. Before 2011, the country’s TV and radio were tightly controlled by the regime of President Ben Ali, one of the most restrictive in the Arab world. Now the media has opened up to a whole range of new players and there is significant freedom of speech, leading many to hold Tunisia up as the Arab Spring’s success story. But while people are able to say what they want in public, this doesn’t necess...

Recrafting Serbia's Economy
Across Serbia, age-old traditions passed down through the generations are dying out. Those hit the hardest are people living in the rural areas who rely on skills like weaving, wood-cutting and pottery to make an income. Realising the potential, the Serbian state is now turning its attention to these micro-enterprises to bolster its economy, offering tax relief and other benefits to artisans. Nicola Kelly speaks to craftsmen and young entrepreneurs about the challenges they face and finds out how they plan ...


Colombia’s Coffee Revolutions
Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia’s struggling farmers? It’s not been easy growing coffee in recent decades in Colombia, where rural life has been dominated by the conflict between guerrillas, paramilitaries and drug traffickers. Now, two years on from the historic peace deal here, how is business benefiting? And with global market prices not even covering growers’ costs, could the trend for coffee with a story come to growers’ rescue? Presenter: Simon Maybin Producer: Karenina Velandia ...

Retail's AI Revolution
Will artificial intelligence change how we shop and decide which retailers succeed? Senior retail executive, Jeremy Schwartz, meets chat bots, robots and the humans behind them, to find out. He explores the impact that the AI revolution may have on jobs - not just the number of them but their nature too. As algorithms take over certain tasks, he asks how humans - and the companies that employ them - will need to respond. And he looks at the growing digital divide between retailers and asks what role AI is p...

On the Trade War Frontline
As international trade tensions escalate, the US state of Wisconsin is a fascinating place to discover the consequences. Specialist producers like Wisconsin's ginseng growers are directly affected by the new trade war between the US and China. Traditional cheese makers meanwhile see all this as the latest round in an endless battle for freer trade in global food. And in the south of the state, a new kind of manufacturing economy is taking shape with a vast new investment by the Taiwanese tech manufacturer F...


How Sex Toys Became Sexy
Do you own a sex toy? And if so, would you admit it to your friends? Increasingly, the answer to both questions is yes. Once a seedy mail-order product advertised in the back pages of porn magazines, sex toys today are marketed as a fun way for couples to enhance their relationships. And in the process, the global sales of these objects of arousal have grown exponentially into the billions of dollars. Laurence Knight explores how this came about, speaking to industry pioneers such as Sam Roddick, Doc Johnso...

Soft Power Seduction: China Lures Taiwan's Youth
Young Taiwanese entrepreneurs working in a start-up hub are offered attractive sweeteners. But this isn’t in California or even Taipei, it’s on the outskirts of Shanghai. The People’s Republic of China is setting its sights on Taiwan’s youth by encouraging them to relocate to the ‘mainland’. Wages in Taiwan have stagnated as its economic growth has failed to keep pace with that of China, prompting thousands of people to leave the island and head to the mega cities of the People’s Republic for better jobs an...

Retiring Retirement
Life expectancy is going up, pensions are declining. Meanwhile the official retirement age has been abolished, while the age at which you can draw your state pension is rising. As a result, more and more of us will have to work until our 70s, or even our 80s. So, asks David Baker, is this the end of retirement? That may not be as bad as it sounds. For In Business, David meets people who could live a quiet, retired life, but choose not to. One founded a bikini company in her 70s, others sell vintage good...


Banking on Change?
Online banking has grown massively, and some new banks don't bother with a branch network at all. But as Ruth Sunderland discovers, some in the banking business still think high street branches and personal service have a bright future. So how far will this financial revolution go? Talking to leading players in the business, Ruth hears how those who want to manage our money are full of new ideas, but facing huge uncertainty about what banking will become. Producer: Chris Bowlby Picture Credit: Shut...

Failures, Flops and Flaws
Thousands of new consumer products are launched every year, and most end in failure. These flops are rarely discussed, and quickly forgotten. The Museum of Failure in Sweden is taking a different approach, showcasing some of the world's most flawed products and services. Ruth Alexander talks to curator Samuel West, and some of the product designers, about what we can learn from commercial mistakes. Producer: John Murphy Image: The 1957 Ford Edsel parked outside the Museum of Failure in Helsingborg, ...

Has Taiwan Lost Its Roar as an “Asian Tiger” Economy?
Once known as a hugely successful " Asian Tiger" economy built on hi-tech manufacturing, Taiwan's recent economic growth has been relatively sluggish, wages have stagnated and young people are leaving for better paid jobs in China and elsewhere. So what does the self-ruled island need to do to start roaring again? Caroline Bayley reports from Taipei. Producer and Presenter: Caroline Bayley Image: Taiwan Credit: BBC...


The Neopolitan Tech Experiment
Can tech entrepreneurs revitalise Southern Italy’s failing economy? Manuela Saragosa visits Naples – which has seen a huge exodus of its talented young people – to explore if a change of direction might be possible. She meets Neapolitans starting up high-tech businesses against the odds and explores why, rather surprisingly, in recent years the city has attracted significant foreign investment from big tech firms. What has been the city’s appeal? She also asks what the business reasons are for building a co...

Our 5G Future
In just a couple of years, the fifth generation mobile network will be available. Like previous generations, 5G will offer consumers greater speed and capability when they use their smartphones and tablets. Advocates argue it is more than just the next step in that evolution. Lightning fast speed, greater bandwidth and more reliability have the potential to transform entire industries: from how a surgeon operates on us and the products we use are made, to how we are transported to and from work and home. In...

Pop for Export in South Korea
As K-pop and K-drama go global, what are the secrets of their success? The Korean Wave - South Korea’s pop culture exports of music and TV dramas - has already swept across much of Asia, including the giant markets of China and Japan, bringing billions of dollars into the country’s economy every year. Now, with boy band BTS topping the US album charts, and hit dramas reaching streaming services around the world, the wave appears to be growing into a tsunami. How did this medium-sized Asian nation end up as ...


How Much is Your Rubbish Worth?
When you throw away rubbish, it can create an environmental problem – or a business opportunity. Your old newspapers, tin cans and plastic bottles are someone else’s valuable harvest. Just like gold, steel, sugar or coffee, rubbish is traded all over the world as a commodity. If it can be recycled, it’s worth money. Until recently, countries vied to recycle the waste of others. But now one of the main players - China - says it doesn’t want foreign rubbish anymore. That has sent this multi-billion dol...

Out of Office: The Rise of the Digital Nomad
What do digital nomads mean for the world of work? A new army of digital nomads is wandering the world. Equipped with a laptop and willing to work anywhere that has Wi-Fi and a low cost of living, they are changing the way millions think about the world of work. But how do firms and Governments adapt to a fast moving, ever changing highly skilled and paid workforce that doesn’t even recognise borders? And do digital nomads represent the future of work or a threat to taxation systems and therefore the n...

Confronting Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment at work has become “normalised” according to the Equality and Human Rights Commission. A recent UK survey by polling company ComRes found that half of women and a fifth of men have experienced it during their careers. From unwanted comments and jokes to inappropriate touching, actions that go beyond office banter seem to have become the norm for many in the workplace. As MPs and shareholders start to look at the issue more closely - business reporter Katie Prescott explores how ...


The Economic Impact of America's Opioid Epidemic
Ohio is one of the worst hit US states for opioid addiction rates and deaths. Huge numbers of people have dropped out of the workforce and employers say they struggle to recruit the people they need. If automation increases as a result, will unemployment, despair and addiction get even worse? And is drug testing workers part of the solution or part of the problem? Claire Bolderson asks why the opioid epidemic has taken such a hold here and visits companies hoping to develop new medical solutions to treat pa...

Ireland's Brexit Challenge
Ireland’s economy is hugely interlinked with its next-door neighbour, the UK, in everything from energy to transport to finance. Can those links be kept after the UK leaves the EU, or will Irish business have to change direction? Ruth Alexander travels to Ireland to find out how businesses large and small are preparing for Brexit, and what challenges - and opportunities - they see. Producer: Chris Bowlby...

The Global Trade Referee
The WTO has facilitated global trade since the 1990s but is now under threat. Ever since he was elected, US President Donald Trump has been critical of the World Trade Organisation, which he has described as a “catastrophe”. Also known as the WTO, the organisation was set up to facilitate global trade and act as a referee in trade disputes. Its ultimate objective is to avoid the sort of trade war that can lead to a real war. But as the United States and China threaten each other with new tariffs, ...


Kenya's Basic Income Experiment
What happens if you give every adult in a village $22 a month, no strings attached, for 12 years? In rural Kenya, researchers are trying to find out. They're conducting the world's largest study of 'universal basic income' - giving 'free money' to nearly 200 villages, to see whether this could kick-start development and bring people out of poverty. The BBC's Africa correspondent Anne Soy visits western Kenya to meet some of the people involved in this giant economic experiment, and to find out what they mak...

Belarus' Tractor Town
The vast Minsk Tractor Works in Belarus was famed all over the Soviet Union. And it's still making tractors. Raging capitalism in the 1990s closed down hundreds of state-owned factories. But Belarus kept open this complex providing not only work but cradle to grave care for tens of thousands of Belarusians. Clinics, nurseries and holiday camps formed an industrial megapolis within a city. Despite its huge workforce, original buildings and old technology, the Minsk factory is finding new markets world-wide a...

The Fish Farming Revolution
By 2050 the world needs to produce 70% more food and we need to do so using fewer resources and with less damage to the environment. Peter Morgan travels to Skjervoy in Norway to find out how technologically sophisticated fish farming businesses are increasing the availability and lowering the price of the fish we consume and he hears about the environmental issues that pose a serious challenge to the sector's growth. He also discovers how fish farming is providing employment for people in remote coastal co...


Can Frankfurt become Europe’s new financial capital?
A small German city with a population of under a million has big ambitions. It wants to beat Paris to the top spot of financial centre of Europe. But can the city of Frankfurt attract the international bankers and their support work force when the UK leaves the European Union next year? Several international banks have already confirmed that staff will be moving to Frankfurt. Office space is secured and the international schools say banks are block booking places for pupils. But what will this mean for Fran...

Putting the Fizz Back into Catalonia’s Cava
Why Spain’s sparkling fizz, Cava, is seeking to re-invent itself. If you think of sparkling wine what probably comes to mind is popping corks and Champagne. But what about Cava from Spain? In terms of exports Cava is as big as Champagne, and it is made in the same expensive, time-consuming way. Yet its image in recent years has suffered and it’s now generally thought of as a cheap, less popular alternative to the likes of Prosecco. Most Cava comes from Catalonia, that region in Spain which has been bese...

The Transparency Detectives
Many fees and charges in the investment industry - which, among other things, manages vast pension fund wealth - have been hidden for decades. Lesley Curwen meets the transparency "detectives" intent on bringing reform to a sector that has long shunned it. She asks why the investment industry has been so slow to embrace change and explores the barriers that might still lie ahead. How much money has been unnecessarily spent and how might more transparency alter the shape and structure of the industry? She a...


Mental Health at the Workplace
Why can you phone in sick with flu but not with depression? Mental health is a big deal in the workplace at the moment. Following recent celebrity and Royal disclosures about their own mental health issues, it's become a hot topic. But away from the glare of publicity what's actually going on - what are employers actually doing? In this edition of In Business David Baker asks how far companies should go in managing their employee's mental health. With technology and an on-call culture increasingly blurring ...

Tanzania’s Second-hand Trade War
Second-hand fashion is big business in Tanzania. Every year, it imports millions of dollars-worth of used clothes from richer nations and many ordinary Tanzanians have come to rely on these - known locally as 'mitumba' - as a reliable source of affordable outfits. Now the Tanzanian government want to phase-out these imports, which they say are killing the local textiles industry. But if they do, they risk losing a lucrative trade-aid deal that allows them to export to the United States duty free. BBC Africa...

Ryanair - a Change of Direction?
In September Ryanair was headline news and in crisis, having had to cancel many thousands of flights at very short notice. By offering extremely low fares to flyers, the company has become one of the world's biggest and most profitable airlines. Matthew Gwyther traces Ryanair's history and explores how its business model differs from its competitors. Has Ryanair suffered reputational damage since September or will its passengers stick with the company no matter what? And has a change of direction now been f...


Electric Cars
There is a motoring revolution underway: the fast accelerating switch from petrol and diesel cars, to electric vehicles. In Norway, almost 40% of new car purchases are now fully electric or hybrids. Other countries are starting to catch up, and are setting ambitious targets. Britain wants to ban the sale of all petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Motor manufacturers are investing vast sums in new electric models. Those who don't, risk being left behind. And yet, as Peter Morgan reports, obstacles remain. Many d...

Putin's Park
President Vladimir Putin has gifted Moscow with a new park – a free public space right next to the Kremlin. Designed by the US architects behind New York’s High Line, Zarydaye Park is a bold step in city branding, aiming to demonstrate that Moscow is open to the world and to innovation. But does it break new ground for large-scale development projects in 21st century Russia? For Global Business, Lucy Ash explores some of the prizes and pitfalls of this notoriously bumpy terrain. Contributors include: ...

What Keeps the Chancellor Awake at Night?
If you're the Chancellor of the Exchequer, worrying about where the next financial crisis might come from, what keeps you awake at night? Jonty Bloom hears about the potential problems which might induce insomnia; including car loans, High Frequency Trading and the threat of Cyber attack. Producer: Phoebe Keane...


Diversifying Russia's Economy
Oil and gas are the backbone of Russia’s economy and swings in energy prices can push the country from boom to bust. 80 per cent of the country's exports are directly related to hydro-carbons. So how successfully is Russia diversifying into new areas? As Caroline Bayley discovers, government money is supporting hi-tech start-ups and counter sanctions imposed by the government on food imports from the US and EU are helping the food sector. However, doing business in Russia is far from straightforward. Prod...

American Jobs: The Ties that Bind
Why are so many US workers forced into job contracts that make it hard for them to leave? Employers routinely ask new recruits to agree to "non-compete" clauses when they start work. This means they might be unable to work for a competitor company, or to set up on their own. Is this a good way to protect intellectual property or an unnecessary infringement of workers' rights? Claire Bolderson goes to Massachusetts to explore the personal and economic impact of the legislation and asks if reform might, final...

Starting Up in Bulgaria
Can entrepreneurs at Sofia Tech Park kick-start one of the EU's poorest countries? Ruth Alexander meets the tiny companies growing fast at Sofia Tech Park, Bulgaria's first technology business centre. Start-up culture is a new phenomenon in the former communist state, which has an unfortunate reputation for corruption; but does it now have what it takes to spark an entrepreneurial revolution? Producer: John Murphy Photo credit: Walltopia...


Uganda’s Refugee Entrepreneurs
Uganda has taken in more than a million South Sudanese refugees. Many have lost almost everything. So how do they get back on their feet? For some of them the answer is to set up a small business. But doing that in a refugee settlement, when you have no capital and many of your customers have no money, is no easy task. Yet markets are sprouting up across the refugee settlements of northern Uganda. There are stalls selling eggs, vegetables, mobile phone cards, jeans; and there are even hairdressers and p...

The Business of Food Waste
With food waste a huge global problem, can business find new, profitable solutions? Tanya Beckett delves into pizza bins, visits larvae breeders and talks to everyone from bankers to hummus-makers as she investigates why this fast-changing business scene. How can new technology help tackle the problem? And are wasteful food consumers ready for radical change? Producer: Chris Bowlby; Editor: Penny Murphy...

Playing the Market
From the film Wall Street, to the play Enron, finance workers and bankers tend to be portrayed negatively in works of fiction. Andrew Dickson traces the history of these depictions, asking if they're fair - and if more positive portrayals would enhance the reputation of the City He speaks to playwrights, a bond trader turned thriller writer, a film historian and a veteran of the banking industry. Producer: Penny Murphy....


Crossing the Line
What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets? As political turmoil engulfs Turkey, total economic collapse threatens in Venezuela and other global threats emerge, In Business explores the point at which businesses decide that enough is enough. Does it depend on the size of the investment and do companies in different sectors play by different rules? And what reputational risk might companies suffer if they get that calculation wrong? Presenter, Matthew Gwyther, talks to bu...

Private Prisons: Who Profits?
Twenty five years after Britain opened its first privately run prison, Matthew Gwyther explores whether private jails in the UK have delivered on the promise of a cost effective, safe, and reliable service. And he looks to the US, the pioneer of the private prison system. Does incarcerating people for profit work? Or does it lead the sector to cut corners, sacrificing safety and security in the pursuit of profit? Producer: Sarah Shebbeare (Photo: A prison guard walks through a cell area at HMP Berwyn. ...

The Secrets of Germany's Success
From sick man of Europe to world's richest exporter - how did Germany do it? At the turn of the century, Germany's economy was weak and its unemployment high. Fast forward to today and the country has overtaken China as the world's richest exporter. To find out how, Caroline Bayley travels to rural South Germany, home to many so called "hidden champions", little-known world market leading companies. But she also hears how for all its economic success, Germany has yet to come up with the next Google. Tho...


Community Enterprise
What role can the community play in rejuvenating their local economy? Globalisation often results in a big geographical divide between where profits are made and where they are spent. Anu Anand visits two communities trying to reverse that trend and keep investment, jobs and profits close to hand. In Frome, in Somerset, she meets local property developers who are keeping rents low and chain stores at bay in a bid to allow local independent retailers to thrive. And in rural Lancashire she spends time with vi...

Fish to Share
Many British fishermen rejoiced after the UK vote to leave the European Union. They hoped it would mean fewer EU boats fishing in UK waters. Business reporter and sailor Lesley Curwen visits ports and harbours at both ends of Britain to talk to fishermen about their hopes and fears, and hears from a group of European fishermen who argue a hard Brexit would destroy thousands of their jobs. Producer: Smita Patel (Image: Newlyn fish market, Cornwall. Credit: BBC)...

Managing a Tower Block
Tower blocks are under intense scrutiny. So what's the best way to run them? Matthew Gwyther visits Manchester and discovers this is not just about architecture. These blocks are also complex communities of people. So what's the future now for this key sector in our housing and commerce? Producer: Chris Bowlby Editor: Penny Murphy....


Forecasting: How to Map the Future
Why do so many economic and business forecasts fail to correctly map the future? Adam Shaw asks why so many recessions take us by surprise and why the failure of certain forecasts should be a cause of celebration, not despair. He examines the role of complexity and groupthink and how technological advance can scupper the best laid forecasts. Do we, as consumers, invest too much faith in forecasts? And is there anything forecasters can do to ensure their pronouncements are more reliable? Producer: Rosamund...

India's Cashless Economy
Nina Robinson looks at how India’s digital payments industry is mushrooming after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s demonetisation ‘shock doctrine’ tactic to rid the country of 500 and 1,000 rupee bills last November. It had an unimaginably huge impact on India’s digital payment and banking systems. The sector now has to cope with an enormous increase in digital payments using your mobile phone. People are making e-payments for goods using these ‘e-wallets’. New digital payment points have sprung up everywhere...

Engineering the Future
For decades the UK has not produced enough engineers. What's been going wrong? Is education at fault or does engineering have an intractable image problem? Engineering is a very male world. If that changes, might its recruitment problem disappear? Ruth Sunderland visits businesses with innovative schemes aimed at reversing the trend, and meets students, teachers and industry leaders. Who will be the engineers of the future? Producer: Rosamund Jones (Image: Ruth Sunderland. Credit: Mark Richards)....


Keeping Up with the Burgers
McDonalds has long dominated the burger market and continues to do so in the UK. But the US owned, giant fast food chain is in the midst of a make-over. Posher burger chains are springing up everywhere and McDonalds is now offering table service and new-look restaurants. Matthew Gwyther, Editor of Management Today, asks how and why McDonalds feels the need to present a new image to its customers and whether it will work in today's health conscious society. Producer: Caroline Bayley....

The Art of the Meeting
We spend hours in meetings at work so what can we do to love them more? Tanya Beckett looks at the art of the meeting and asks how can we make them more productive & enjoyable. How do you deal with the person who never stops talking, or someone who spends an entire hour on their smartphone? Tanya learns how to prepare for successful meetings and discovers that how they're run tells us a lot about the culture of an organisation, and even a country. Produced by Smita Patel....

Rebooting Rural Russia
The Kremlin has been flexing economic and political muscles on the world stage but the Russian economy is struggling to keep up. Plunging oil prices, U.S. and European sanctions over Ukraine and military operations in Syria have all taken their toll. People across the country are feeling the pinch but rural areas are the hardest hit – much of the countryside is empty and dying. Almost 36,000 villages, or one in four, have 10 residents or fewer. Another 20,000 are abandoned, according to the latest census. Y...


The Big Fat Greek Struggle
How have private businesses fared in Greece since the crisis began? The economy has shrunk by nearly a third and unemployment has soared. So what have companies had to do to survive? And have any managed to actually thrive? Louise Cooper meets hopeful entrepreneurs, embattled importers, and a few small companies going underground in a bid to avoid rising costs and disappearing demand. Can Greece ever return to growth? Producer: Rosamund Jones....

From Ex-Offender to Entrepreneur
The number of women in prison globally is rapidly increasing. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research has calculated that between 2000 and 2015, the female prison population around the world grew by 50%, compared with an 18% rise in male prisoners over the same period. Re-offending rates are high, and overcoming the stigma of a prison sentence makes finding a job extremely tough. But can entrepreneurship break the cycle? Caroline Bayley speaks to six former women prisoners across three continents. They w...

In Business: Northern Ireland and Brexit
Northern Ireland is the only part of the UK that shares a land border with the European Union. It voted to stay in the EU in last year’s referendum. Tens of thousands cross between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland every day to work. Matthew Gwyther, the editor of Management Today, travels across Northern Ireland to find out how businesses – large and small – are preparing for life outside the EU and what the potential impact is for the vitally important agriculture industry. (Image: Traffic ...


In Business: Why are the French so productive?
Productivity, or the lack of it, is one of the great puzzles of the British economy at the moment. Productivity is not about how hard we work, but how much value we get for each hour of graft. And the French seem to be better at that than the British. Jonty Bloom explores how workers in France can put in shorter hours and take longer holidays and yet still have productivity levels close to those seen in Germany and the United States. And he asks whether high productivity always makes for a better e...

Mexican remittances on the rise
Why are Mexicans working abroad sending more money back home? Last year total remittance payments for Mexico reached a record of nearly $27bn – most of that came from Mexicans working in the United States. But it’s a sensitive time with President Trump determined to clamp down on illegal immigrants and build a wall along the US-Mexican border. Caroline Bayley asks how significant those payments are to relatives back home and the Mexican economy as a whole. (Image: Mexican farmer and his wife. Copyright: ...

Denmark's Wind Power Progress
Denmark is on course to generate 50% of its electricity from wind power in the next three years. The move towards clean energy and self sufficiency stands in stark contrast to the situation the country found itself in after the 1973 oil crisis when street lighting was reduced and people were told not to drive on Sundays. Keith Moore visits the Scandinavian country and discovers how public support and political will has created an industry that not only makes environmental sense but business sense too. (...


In Business: The NHS - The Recruitment Dilemma
Since its inception, the National Health Service has always relied on doctors and nurses who have been trained overseas. How does it plan for the workforce it requires? In the second of two programmes exploring today's health service, doctor-turned-journalist Smitha Mundasad, asks why the NHS is currently facing a recruitment crisis on so many fronts. She'll ask what impact Brexit could have. Can pharmacists, physician associates and other health workers do some of the work doctors do, and so reduce staff s...

In Business: The NHS and Productivity
The NHS is facing a sustained squeeze. An ageing population, the rising cost of new treatments and increasing patient demand on the one hand, and the impact of continued austerity on the other. What can it do? One answer might lie in improving productivity. In the first of two programmes on the NHS, Louise Cooper explores its productivity puzzle. What does increased productivity look like in the health service? She meets clinicians, across the country, who are trying to do more for less. Can their efforts b...

In Business: Mexico and Mr Trump
How is Mexico preparing for the presidency of Donald Trump? During the election campaign Mr Trump promised to tear up trade agreements with Mexico, build a border wall and send back millions of illegal Mexican immigrants. Caroline Bayley travels to Mexico to find out how the country feels about the US's new president and what impact his policies might have on Mexico. Producer: Anna Meisel. (Image: A woman hits a piñata of Donald Trump during a protest in Mexico City, on October 12, 2016. Credit: RONALDO ...


In Business: Transforming Trains?
Work on HS2 is finally due to start next year. And those whose housing will be affected have dominated the headlines. But what will it mean for business? For some it seems a huge opportunity if high speed rail kick starts much broader regeneration. Other businesses face major challenges during construction, or fear they'll lose out when the new railway changes the way people work. And what does it all tell us about how the UK copes with major infrastructure? Maryam Moshiri visits Sheffield and north London ...

In Business: Corporations and the Arts
Who pays for the arts, who should pay for the arts? In the UK, there is controversy about corporate sponsorship of arts organisations - particularly oil companies. In the US, there is a very different approach and state funding is much lower. Andrew Dickson examines the funding models and speaks to BP as well as a number of leading arts organisations. Producer, Penny Murphy (Image: Burlington House, the Piccadilly site for the Royal Academy of Arts. Credit: Fraser Mar)....

In Business: Brexit and the Future of Farming
What will Brexit mean for the future of British farms? The EU has been subsidising agriculture - via the Common Agricultural Policy - for decades, and there is a tariff-free market for produce. Jonty Bloom looks at the challenges that lie ahead. Producer, Ruth Alexander....


In Business: Whatever Happened to Advertising?
Last year, the UK became the first place where spending on digital ads exceeded that spent on all other forms of advertising combined. In this new world, what are ad agencies doing to square up to the challenges they face? Management Today's Matthew Gwyther presents. The producer is Nina Robinson. (Image: A visitor looks at old posters advertising various chocolate products at the Belgian Chocolate Village museum. Credit: EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)...

In Business: The Italian Banking Crisis
Why are Italy's banks in crisis and what's the impact on business? The country's banks have huge numbers of non-performing loans, the result of nearly a decade of recession. The economy has shrunk by nearly 10% in that time. Some small banks have already failed, others may follow. What has it been like to do business through these very lean times? Are banks continuing to lend? And what solutions might there be for one of Europe's biggest players? Ruth Sunderland visits small businesses, the backbone of the ...

Global Business: Estonia’s e-Residents
Estonia is one of the smallest countries in Europe, with only 1.3 million citizens. But it is hoping to become much bigger – by attracting what it calls e-residents. A scheme was started two years ago to give citizens of any nation the opportunity to set up Estonian bank accounts and businesses – and to develop a digital identity which can be managed from anywhere. Ruth Alexander examines how it works, and who benefits....


Global Business: A Tree of Life
When it comes to business, much of the focus in Sweden is on its successful tech start-ups. But its traditional industries are still a cornerstone of the economy. Global Business' Keith Moore takes a look at Sweden's forestry industry by following the journey of a tree, from the forest, to the sawmills and through to the shops many of us visit across the world. (Photo: Felled trees in a forest)...

In Business: Brexit: The Response of the French Abroad
How has London's French community fared since Brexit? Caroline Bayley explores why so many entrepreneurs have chosen to start businesses on this side of the channel. And what is the capital's attraction for so many of France's young people? After the vote to leave the EU, the response of many French ex-pats was deep shock. Three months on, are French people and companies re-assessing their future in the UK? And will London be as open for business as it has been in the past? Producer: Rosamund Jones....

In Business: Start-up Scotland
Brexit, a global slump in oil prices, and political uncertainty around a second independence referendum; these have combined to place the Scottish business community in uncharted waters. Additionally, Scotland has longer term historical structural issues, particularly when it comes to successfully starting and growing new ventures. It is widely recognised that the Scottish economy needs to grow faster and be less dependent on both fossil fuels and inward investment. For this edition of 'In Business', the BB...


In Business: Making Babies - the business of fertility
The business of making babies is booming, both in the UK and globally, as recent research suggests the world’s fertility industry is set to be worth an estimated 15 billion pounds by the year 2020. One in six couples in the world are thought to experience fertility problems. There's a huge range of treatments available – from egg donation and specialist ‘add ons’ to improve the odds, to egg freezing and surrogacy, not to mention an increasing market for gay and lesbian couples. In Britain, the NHS restr...

In Business: Has 3D printing lived up to the hype?
Peter Day takes a close look at the progress of 3D printing in manufacturing 5 years on from the first programme he made about this new way of making things. Back then there was much hype and excitement about its potential to revolutionise traditional manufacturing. From aircraft parts to cartilage in knees, Peter discovers 3D printing's current range and uses and asks whether it's really lived up to its early promise. Producer: Caroline Bayley...

In Business: Supportive partner = success at work
According to Sheryl Sandberg – Chief Operating Office of Facebook and one of the most powerful people in the world - the most important career choice you’ll make as a woman is who you choose to be your life partner. Whilst men tend to assume they can have it all – a great career AND a great family - women don’t. And she puts that down to the uneven division of labour in the home. She claims in households where both parents work full time, women do twice the amount of house work and three times the amount of...


In Business: A Virtual World
A new technology is emerging which could change the world as significantly as mobile phones or the Internet. That technology is Virtual Reality. Up to now it’s mainly been used for fun - but things are changing. Adam Shaw investigates how VR could change our lives and revolutionise the world of business. Enabling us to be in two places at once and, for example, replacing the need for many painkillers and helping cure psychological problems. Producer: Smita Patel...

In Business: How Safe Are Your Secrets?
Companies don't often like to admit it, but we know the spies are out there, attempting to infiltrate almost every sector of industry, eager to winkle out the most valuable corporate secrets. And they sometimes succeed, passing on the information to rivals whether at home or abroad. So what can be done to pursue the perpetrators and protect business from this growing threat? In this episode of In Business Peter Day learns the lessons from businesses that have fallen victim to corporate espionage and he hear...

Global Business: Pitch Night
Trinitas Mhango is one of a new generation of young, would-be entrepreneurs in Malawi. She has a dream of making it big in business and she has a great idea - to mass produce and sell sanitary pads in one of the poorest countries in Africa, where millions of girls and women cannot afford proper sanitary management. The market research she has done shows it is a potentially huge market and Malawi desperately needs people like her to succeed and help grow its near bottom of the GDP league economy. There is ju...


In Business: Return to Teesside
Job losses have plagued Teesside for decades and the area still has a stubbornly high unemployment rate. Ruth Sunderland grew up in Middlesbrough where her father worked as an engineer. In 1987 the company, where he'd been employed since he was a teenager, collapsed and he never worked again. Believing there was no future for her in her home town, she left to forge a career in London. Following more recent job losses in the steel industry, Ruth returns to her roots. Will entrepreneurial start-ups provide yo...

Global Business: Chattanooga - the High Speed City
Chattanooga has been re-inventing itself for decades. In the late 1960s Walter Cronkite referred to the city as "the dirtiest in America." Since then heavy industry has declined and, to take its place, civic leaders have been on a mission to bring high-tech innovation and enterprise to Chattanooga. In 2010 the city became the first in America to enjoy gig speed internet following an investment of a couple of hundred million dollars from its publically-owned electricity company, EPB. What economic and psycho...

Global Business: Growing Malawi
Malawi, in Sub-Saharan Africa, is one of the world’s poorest countries with its GDP nearly at the bottom of the global league table. Successive governments have been riddled with corruption scandals, state-run services are in disarray and Malawi’s population is booming. It hit 17.6m this year, which the Finance Minister described as "scary" and is set to more than double over the next two decades. If Malawi is struggling to feed its people now - how bad could things be in the future? It’s a ticking time ...


In Business: Steel in the UK
Amid concern about the future of the Port Talbot steel works - and fear for the jobs of workers there - Peter Day looks at the history of the industry in Britain. When was the heyday of British steel, and what went wrong? Peter visits Port Talbot and also delves into the archives to hear stories from a time when manufacturing dominated the British economy. Presenter: Peter Day Producer: Caroline Bayley....

In Business: Turnarounds
Imagine you run a company and it's failing. What do you do? Matthew Gwyther speaks to leaders who've turned around businesses in difficulties and finds out how they did it, what inspired them and what lessons they can pass on. Produced by Nina Robinson....

In Business: Recruiting by Algorithm
Can a computer programme choose the right applicant for a job? Online assessments, scanning programmes, computer algorithms and the number crunching of social network data are all now part of the tool kit of the recruitment industry. As Peter Day discovers, to get through to an actual interview, you often have to impress a computer algorithm first. Traditionally a subjective process, Peter looks at this huge change in the way people are selected for jobs and asks whether technology can achieve the recruiter...


In Business: Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment
Marijuana is now legal in some US states and a fast-growing industry has emerged, especially in Colorado which was the first state to embrace the drug. But according to federal law marijuana is still illegal. This means that many companies can't get banking services, advertise their wares or pay tax in the way that other companies do. So how do they survive and thrive? And in what direction is the US moving? Will marijuana soon become a legal drug, like alcohol, across the US? Or will law-makers decide that...

Global Business: Selling Shakespeare
As part of the festivities for the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Global Business asks how the Bard has had an impact on the corporate world. As well as being a profitable part of the British economy, particularly for the tourist sector in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s plays have been exported to almost every country there is. In Neuss, Germany, a replica of the Globe has stood since 1991. In Bollywood, Shakespeare’s stories have been retold since the dawn of Indian cinema, and becom...

In Business: European Unicorns
A Unicorn is a mythical animal. But it's also the name now given to private start-up companies, mainly in the tech or internet sector which are valued at a billion dollars or more. They're extremely fast-growing and are often keener to increase customers rather than make profits at this stage. They rely on private investors to fund their growth and those investors give the companies their valuations. Through interviews with European unicorns including Blah, Blah Car, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh w...


In Business: Tax transparency - Norway's model
The Panama papers reveal tax evasion is a huge international problem. But how can governments clean things up? One way might be by opening things up. In the UK, it is a criminal offence to reveal someone else's tax affairs, but in some countries you can easily discover how much anyone earns and how much they pay in tax, from the prime minister and the richest business leader to the poorest pensioner. It can have a profound effect on business practice and wider society, as business correspondent Jonty Bloom ...

Economic Rebellion
Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities? Since the financial crash, many students have been in revolt in the UK and overseas, determined to change the content of their courses. They are not alone. Employers and some economists share many of their concerns. Peter Day explores why the subject has changed over a generation and why that might matter. Producer: Rosamund Jones...

Going Online the Cambodian Way
If you come from a country with few internet users and even fewer smartphone owners, why would you set up an internet shopping business? “I wanted to buy a present for my then girlfriend,” says Vichet In, who is the founder and CEO of one of Cambodia’s first and most successful forays into e-commerce. In 2013 only around 6% of Cambodians used the internet. But there’s been a rapid rise in internet usage and in smartphone ownership. Which is good news for Vichet and his siblings, who have become involved i...


Germany’s New Workforce?
Over a million migrants have arrived in Germany in the past year. But could this inflow of new potential employees form the basis of a new German workforce? The population of Europe’s largest economy is currently shrinking meaning in some industries there is a growing shortage of workers. Paul Henley investigates whether the new arrivals could be the answer to Germany’s future economic problems? But he also hears from those who believe the new migrants don’t have the right skills to work in a modern high-te...

Global Business: Oil – How low will it go?
Peter Day chairs a discussion about the current low price of oil. He and his guests explore the reasons for the volatility in energy markets and examine the implications for the global economy. Producer Caroline Bayley...

Norway's European Vision
Norway isn't a member of the European Union, but does business with the EU. Is it a model for other countries? Jonty Bloom speaks to people working in a range of businesses - including Norway's vital fishing industry - and asks about the advantages and disadvantages of the arrangement. Produced by Ruth Alexander...


Global Business: Making Money Out Of Germany's Migrants
In the Autumn of 2015 the German city of Munich found itself at the centre of Europe's refugee crisis. Everyday thousands of refugees arrived in the city seeking sanctuary. But what has been the effect on Munich's business community? Paul Henley has been to the city to speak to those companies benefiting from the huge numbers of new arrivals. Paul hears from an air dome company that in three years is expecting it's turnover to have quadrupled, and a translation company who has had take on an extra eight hun...

In Business: Truckers: women behind the big wheel
A global industry is facing a staffing crisis, with tens of thousands of new recruits needed across Europe and the United States - yet many people would never consider the job, or even believe it's a job they could do. Why? Because it's truck-driving - an industry with an image problem, where the work is still very much seen as men-only. Could the solution to this staffing crisis lie in attracting more women to get behind the wheel? Caroline Bayley hits the road with some of the female drivers already h...

Global Business: Investing in Iran
As the day when sanctions against Iran are lifted draws closer Global Business looks at the business prospects there for those inside, and outside, the country. Presenter, Caroline Bayley talks to Iranian entrepreneurs keen to see Western investment in their country and European companies eager to do business there. They discuss the needs of the country and the potential challenges investors will face when Iran once again, joins the global economy....


In Business: Not so small beer
Peter Day explores the rise of craft beer and how the big breweries are fighting back by buying up the competition Producer: Rosamund Jones....

Global Business: The Business of Trust
The revelation that Volkswagen cheated emissions tests is the latest in a line of scandals that have dented the public's faith in business since 2008's financial crisis. It was seen as a betrayal of trust. But just what is trust and how important is it in business? And, once it has been lost, can it ever be won back? The editor of Management Today, Matthew Gwyther, interviews Rupert Stadler, the chairman of Audi - which is part of the VW group. He also speaks to the chairman of the John Lewis Pa...

In Business: The Sexy Salaryman
The white collar worker has become a central figure in TV series and comic books in Japan. Ruth Alexander travels to Tokyo to explore the rise of the middle manager as cult hero, speaking to best-seller novelists, manga artists and TV directors about why the workplace makes such good drama. She finds out what the fictional exploits of the 'salaryman’ tell us about doing business in Japan, and hears about the emergence of a new character getting attention in popular culture - the salarywoman. Prese...


Global Business: The Rise of the Executive PA
The executive personal assistant is a job that requires utmost discretion and an inbuilt ability to know what the boss needs before they need it. In an age where many administrative tasks are being delegated to computers, the human touch of the skilled executive assistant is gaining value in the corporate suite. Sathnam Sanghera finds out how the role of the Man Men secretary has evolved into the contemporary assistant and discovers how indispensable these modern day multitaskers are to the success of a CEO...


Global Business: The Violins of Cremona
Cremona in northern Italy is the original home of the Stradivarius violin and now - several centuries later - master craftsmen are still producing hand-made violins and exporting around the world. But how can such a niche industry survive in the modern world of mass production?...

What makes a company last?
Peter Day asks whether companies really should still be built to last in today's hi-tech internet world. What are the characteristics of those that stand the test of time? Many do learn to change or even re-invent themselves while others, such as Woolworths, have disappeared altogether. In interviews with business leaders and entrepreneurs he discusses whether longevity still matters. Producer: Caroline Bayley...

Global Business: Online Shopping in Rural China
In some villages in rural China they're replacing the sounds of chickens and farm life with something very 21st century. In the village of Qing Yan Liu, four hours south of Shanghai, they've created a world of bubble wrap and sticky tape. The people here have embraced going online to become an internet shopping hub. In the eyes of the Chinese Premier this could be the future of rural China. He hopes that more and more places will copy what has happened in “China’s Number One E-Commerce village”. He wants to...


China Going Green
China is the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Many Chinese dream of seeing blue skies and white clouds but rarely do because of the smog. Often the daily routine is to wake up and check the pollution levels to decide if it is safe for children to play outside, or if a filter mask should be worn for protection. Ahead of December’s UN Climate Change summit, Peter Day reports on the Chinese ambitions to make China ‘go green’. Many people say the Chinese aren’t given enough credit for their ...

Global Business: A Tale of Two Farms
Peter Day continues his reports from the drought stricken central valley of California. This week he visits two family farms. Both grow fruit and nut crops. Both reflect the central role of migration and water in Californian history. They were founded by incomers; one from Japan, the other Mexico. But that is where the similarities end. These farms are separated by heartless geology. One has access to good quality groundwater, the other does not. Producer : Rosamund Jones...

Global Business: The California Drought
California has some of the world's most productive agricultural land. It puts fruit and vegetables on America's tables and exports huge amount of produce too; nearly all of the almonds we consume come from there. But the state is also enduring a severe drought, now into its fourth year. Farm land is being fallowed, farm workers are losing their jobs and thousands of wells are drying up. Some farmers believe that this year is the tipping point. If rain does not fall in the winter, they'll be unable to farm n...


Global Business: Steinway
For more than 150 years, Steinway and Sons have been building handmade pianos to please the ear of the most discerning musicians. Their sound fills concert halls around the world. Why? Is it simply because they're the best; the best marketed or is there another reason? Peter Day visits one of Steinway's two factories, in Astoria New York, to find out what gives this instrument its prized status in the concert world and ask if this once family owned firm can keep its place on the world stage. Produce...

Global Business: Graphene
It would take an elephant balanced on the tip of a pencil to break through a sheet of graphene the thickness cling film. That's the description those promoting this new wonder material like to use to illustrate the strength of graphene. The atomic material was isolated by two scientists at Manchester University in 2004. Now, just over a decade and one Nobel prize later, Peter Day visits the newly opened the National Graphene Institute. Its aim is to bring business and science together, to develop potentia...

Global Business: Companies without managers
Who's your boss? Peter Day explores how three different companies, in three different countries, do business without managers. Who hires and fires? And how do you get a pay rise? He asks how these radical organisations emerged, and whether other companies may follow their lead. Producer: Rosamund Jones...


A Night at the Opera
Opera is an expensive art form. It receives millions of pounds of public money. Can that be justified? Peter Day gets a range of operatic experiences - from top opera companies, to pub performers and a country house summer festival. The first opera was performed 400 years ago in Italy; how does the future look? Producer: Penny Murphy...

In Business: Driverless Cars
As the race to develop driverless cars hots up around the world, the UK is determined not to be left in the slow lane. Government money is being invested to help test vehicles and 'pods' over the next three years. It's not just the robotic technology which is being developed- building the trust of the public in vehicles which eventually won't need drivers behind the wheel is crucial There's still a long way to go, and Peter Day talks to those involved in this brave new world of transport....


MisBehaving with Richard Thaler
What exactly is economics? Science or art? An explanation of our society based on observable, demonstrable law or is it an attempt to systematise the unknowable: the mysteries of the human mind? Peter Day puts these questions to the economist and bestselling author of Nudge, Professor Richard Thaler, one of the founding fathers of behavioural economics. This relatively new branch of the dismal science tries to shed light on the way people make choices in their everyday lives and why subtle changes in the...

Global Business: The Circular Economy
As Dame Ellen MacArthur circumnavigated the globe she got first-hand knowledge of the finite nature of the world’s resources. When she retired from sailing she created a foundation to promote the concept of a 'Circular Economy' - where resources are re-used and waste reduced to zero. Many companies around the world - including some of the biggest, like Unilever - are responding to her ideas. Peter Day talks to the record-breaking sailor, to Unilever, and to the creators of an innovative urban farm in New...

Global Business: Out of the Desert
Mohed Altrad was born in the Syrian desert, an orphan and in poverty. He does not know how old he is. He is now a French billionaire and he has just been chosen as Ernst and Young World Entrepreneur of the Year. In this week's Global Business he tells Peter Day about his extraordinary story and the international company he's created over the past 30 years....


Global Business: Colombia’s Women Mean Business
An International Labour Organization report ranked Colombia second globally for the percentage of women in middle and senior management positions. Peter Day investigates why Colombian women have managed to advance in business and whether the figures are a true reflection of life for women in a country known for its machismo culture....

Global Business: Medellin’s Lessons
Over the past decade the Colombian city of Medellin has changed its reputation from murder capital to model of innovation. Peter Day investigates how the city’s transformation led by its public institutions might have lessons for other cities struggling with violence and poverty....

In Business: Medellin Miracle
Medellin used to be one of the most dangerous cites on earth; with a reputation for kidnapping and murder, as well as a thriving drugs trade. Now Colombia's second city has become a top global tourist destination. Peter Day reports on a remarkable transformation....


Global Business: Silicon Alley
New York City has its own Silicon Alley and Manhattan is fast becoming a hub for high tech start ups. Peter Day talks to the entrepreneurs trying to make it in the Big Apple by taking advantage of the brain power no longer locked up in banks and the advances faster and smarter computers can offer....

In Business: Thinking Machines
One of the most famous computer systems in the world is called Watson, developed by IBM. It's best known in for beating two human contestants to win the American game show, Jeopardy. Watson may now be leading a revolution in 'machine learning'. Peter Day reports from New York City, fast becoming a high tech rival of Silicon Valley, to find out how smart our machines are becoming and whether we should be worried about the impact Artificial Intelligence will have our lives....

In Business: Immigration - The Business View
Immigration is one of the key issues of the General Election campaign. Peter Day asks businesses, big and small, what they think about immigration. How dependent is Britain on workers from other countries in Europe, and beyond? What impact have tighter visa restrictions for migrants from outside Europe had on British business?...


In Business: Circular Economy
As Dame Ellen MacArthur circumnavigated the globe she got first-hand knowledge of the finite nature of the world's resources. When she retired from sailing she created a foundation to promote the concept of a 'Circular Economy' - where resources are re-used and waste reduced to zero. Many companies around the world - including some of the biggest, like Unilever - are responding to her ideas. Peter Day talks to the record-breaking sailor, to Unilever, and to the creators of an innovative urban farm in New Je...

Global Business: What’s Ailing Argentina
Businesses in Argentina say they suffer from too much red tape, rampant inflation and import restrictions. Middle class Buenos Aires residents say the cost of everyday goods in supermarkets makes life difficult. Peter Day hears from business leaders with innovative solutions and a former government minister tells him how he is saddened by the country’s current economic plight....

In Business: Blank Screens
The Information Technology department used to be a mysterious backroom operation, but has become the vital component of a successful company. With relentless technical developments businesses are facing a constant risk of their computer systems being past their sell by date. Peter Day explores how companies are wrestling with the increasing demands of keeping their I.T fit for purpose....


Global Business: Second Curve
Business commentator and social philosopher Charles Handy speaks to Peter Day about his new book, The Second Curve, and asks if we should all plan on reinventing ourselves in later life to take advantage of new trends, innovations and ideas that will affect the future world of work...

In Business: The Freelance Economy/Micros
The growing freelance and micro-business economy is explored by Peter Day. Why are so many people setting up on their own and will it be a decision they'll come to regret?...

Horse Play
Innovation is hard work, says the British-born author and entrepreneur Kevin Ashton. He was a pioneer of what is now called the Internet of Things, adding communications ability to millions of objects through his insightful work with sensors....


Global Business: The Circular Economy
Peter Day talks with the record breaking yachtswoman, Ellen MacArthur, and Unilever CEO, Paul Polman, about their work promoting the circular economy – where resources are reused and waste reduced to zero and asks how businesses can put these ideas into practice....


In Business: Money Making
Peter Day explores the future of money and payments and asks how "cashless" we may become....

In Business: Meet the Vloggers
Peter Day meets the vloggers who start off making videos in their bedroom and end up being courted by big brands. Can these new relationships disrupt the old ways of marketing?...

In Business: 21st Century Unlimited
New ways of doing business are making people think hard about how companies function. Peter Day hears how these alternative economies work, and what they might do....


Global Business: Cabin Fever
Up in the air stuck in a metal tube for hours, can flying ever be a nice experience? Peter Day meets a clutch of British based experts trying to improve the way the world flies....

In Business: Kindness Revisited
Random acts of kindness can help businesses grow in surprising ways. Peter Day talks with one woman who tells how the generosity of others made all the difference to her company....

In Business: For Ever and Ever
Britain's cathedrals have defined the landscape for centuries but what's their role today? Peter Day hears about the business of running some of the country's most famous places....


In Business: Cabin Fever
Up in the air stuck in a metal tube for hours, can flying ever be a nice experience? Peter Day meets a clutch of British-based experts trying to improve the way the world flies....

Young Horizons
On last week’s Global Business from the Drucker Forum we heard grim predictions for the future from management experts. This week we hear some younger, more optimistic voices....

Can We Manage?
Peter Day asks leading experts at the Drucker Forum how we can get out of the mess caused by the 2008 financial crisis and whether Capitalism is at breaking point....


In Business: A Tale of Two Sanctions
Peter Day talks to companies affected by economic sanctions imposed against Russia, and by retaliatory sanctions imposed by Russia, and asks how they cope....

The Philosophical Business Plan
As Peter Day has been discovering, business people have much to learn from philosophers – whose insights could even boost a company’s profits....

It's the Little Things
Peter Day talks to the Professor Robert Cialdini, an expert in the scientific study of persuasion, about how little actions can make big differences in the way we live, work and shop....


Sovereign Wealth Funds
They’re worth a staggering $5 trillion – and growing fast. Should we worry about the power of Sovereign Wealth Funds? Peter Day investigates...

Myanmar Challenges
Insights from two home-grown marketing companies into a country emerging after decades of isolation...

In Business: Learning to do Business
Peter Day meets the local entrepreneurs of the new Myanmar and discovers their priorities and pitfalls of doing business in an emerging economy...


In Business: Myanmar Awakening
Peter Day travels to Myanmar, formally known as Burma, to find out how the country is trying to emerge from its undeveloped past into the modern interconnected world....

In Business: Thanks for the Memory
The internet creates the possibility of total recall forever for many of life's most significant moments. Peter Day talks to people building businesses around this new idea....


In Business: Take a Bow
Peter Day visits Cremona in northern Italy to see how a centuries old centre of violin making can survive in a fast changing musical world....

Health Technology
Peter Days goes to Silicon Valley to discover the innovations that are promising to transform healthcare. Can the technology companies really help us live longer, healthier lives?...

Inside Silicon Valley
Can Silicon Valley's enormous success as the global centre of innovation continue indefinitely? Peter Day explores the Valley's past and present to find out about its future....


In Business: Fast and Furious
Peter Day reports on how the influence of UK motor racing is now reaching out into other businesses and our everyday lives inspired by the dramatic expertise of the pit-stop....

Silicon Valley: Steve Blank
In the first in a three-part series about and from Silicon Valley, Peter Day talks to Steve Blank about a career path that has spanned several decades in the Valley....

In Business: Philosophy
Peter Day talks to business people who are being inspired by the great philosophers and finds out what company leaders can learn from their ideas and theories....


Companies and Innovation
Peter Day talks with two authors, the business guru Lynda Gratton and the innovation expert Thomas Wedell-Wedellsborg, about the benefits innovation can have for the company and for society and how to best let ideas flourish and grow....


Global Biz: Packaging in a Pickle
Modern living generates increasing amounts of packaging to wrap up the things we buy. That generates widespread criticism of an industry. Peter Day investigates....

Raghuram Rajan
Peter Day talks to Raghuram Rajan, Governor of the Reserve Bank of India...

In Business: Packaging in a Pickle
Modern living generates increasing amounts of packaging to wrap up the things we buy. That generates widespread criticism of an industry. Peter Day invetigates....


Sharing Economy 2: Rachel Botsman
Rachel Botsman is a guru on the sharing economy. She coined the phrase ‘collaborative consumption’ and is the author of the influential book ‘What’s Mine is Yours’. In Global Business this week, Peter Day talks with Rachel about this movement: how it puts twentieth century consumerism in a whole different light, its economic implications for this century and the stumbling blocks along the way....

In Business: Price Conscious
Manufacturers were banned by law from fixing retail prices 50 years ago, ushering in a revolution in British retailing. So what do prices mean now? Peter Day finds out....

In Business: The Sharing Economy
Sharing your neighbour's car, tools and clothes: the sharing economy. But existing regulations and laws are set up for hotels and car hire companies, and that is causing problems....


Korea Change: The end of the South Korea model?
South Korea has gone through a huge transformation in the last sixty years. But as Peter Day reports it may be time for this driven country to change direction. Producer: Charlotte Pritchard...

In Business: Has the book a future?
Amidst mergers, ebooks, and self-publishing the book business is in the throes of upheaval. From the London Book Fair Peter Day asks: Can books survive, and if so, how?...


Engineers in the City
Peter Day looks at some of the big challenges facing cities around the world through the eyes of the people who tackle these problems for a living: engineers....

In Stradivari's footsteps
Cremona in northern Italy is the home of the Stradivarius violin and 280 years after the death of the venerated violin maker, Antonio Stradivari , the long tradition continues today. In some 150 workshops around the city dedicated craftspeople make several thousand violins a year and they sell at high prices. Peter Day asks what the role is today of this kind of handwork in the age of mass production....

In Business: The New Manufacturing
Peter Day reports from Britain's former steel capital, Sheffield, on what it takes for a manufacturing firm to survive and prosper in an intensely globalising world....


Business in the Veneto
Peter Day reports from the Veneto region of Italy, where family owned businesses reach out to the rest of the world despite the economic turmoil at home....

Creative Economy
John Howkins – Peter Day talks with John Howkins, an expert on the creative economy about how knowledge based industries are changing the way we live and work around the world....

Ambitious Korea
South Korea has rapidly become one of the most advanced internet connected nations in the world, with the fastest connections. It is now thinking hard about a high technology future, investing in 5G or fifth generation mobile technology and robotics. Peter Day hears of their ambitious plans, and meets robots who might one day be caring for us all....


Korea Change
Sixty years ago post war South Korea was one of the poorest nations on earth. Now it's one of the richest, and also one of the hardest working. Korean products are known all over the world. But --as Peter Day reports-- it may be time for this driven country to change direction....

In Business: Cork
Peter Day travels to Cork in Ireland to find out what life is really like in a country just recently realised from the constraints of an EU bailout....

In Business: Cyber Town Malvern
The small spa town of Malvern is rapidly becoming a hub of science and innovation in the 21st century fight against cyber crime. Peter Day visits the historic town to find out why....


In Business: Stitch in Time
Peter Day asks how serious an option manufacturing in the UK is for the British fashion industry as retailers demand ever faster response times and costs rise abroad....

In Business: The Music Industry
Peter Day investigates how much the music industry has changed in the past decade and asks how businesses, and musicians, have had to adapt as a result....

Global Look Ahead 2014
Peter Day talks with three experts in their fields about the trends that will be affecting our lives in 2014....


In Business: Panto
Pantomime time means weeks of lots of bums on seats for hardpressed theatres across the country. Peter Day goes behind the scenes in Nottingham....

Workplace Revolution
Peter Day asks why office design has lagged behind the digital revolution and whether the days of the regular commute are finally drawing to a close....

In Business: Disability at Work
Employers are now ultra sensitive to discrimination at work, but what does that mean for people with disabilities and the people they work with? Peter Day finds out....


Entrepreneur of the Year, Part 2
Stories of business struggle and success – Peter Day interviews four country winners at the World Entrepreneur of the Year Awards in Monte Carlo....

In Business: Longevity War Game
The rich people of Newcastle live 11 more healthy years than the poor. Peter Day spends time at Newcastle University where they are trying to work out how to bridge this gap....

Water
Peter Day learns more about global trends affecting one of the world's most precious resources: water....


Mass Made to Order
Peter Day hears from Joe Pine about how his theory of mass customisation has developed and why many business still have to learn about what their customers really want....

Brand China
Huawei, Shang Xia and Xiaomi may not be names you have heard of but they are examples of brands at the heart of key changes in the Chinese economy. Peter Day reports from China....


The Tale of Two Chinas
The music from Chairman Mao’s era and the sound of posh coffee being brewed are two very different ways to start the day in China. Peter Day explores two contrasting enclaves....

The World Turned Upside Down
Peter Day argues that since he first presented In Business 25 years ago, the internet has led to a revolution that replaces mass production for mass markets with customised trading....

The Entrepreneurial State
Peter Day talks to the author and economist Mariana Mazzucato who argues that the state has a huge part to play in bringing new goods and services to market....


China's Economic Crossroads
The Chinese government plans to have 200 million graduates by 2020. But cracks in the plan are being shown by the class of 2013. Peter Day asks why these graduates can't find jobs....

Survivors' Stories
In Peter Day's 25 years of presenting this programme, he has seen a succession of booms and busts, and heard from people who seem to know how to survive in business. He's been back to revisit a few of them, to find out what lessons they have learnt....

The Internet of Things
Techies are talking about the coming Internet of Things: 50 billion interconnected objects, from cars to coffee machines. Peter Day asks what it means and how it may happen....


The Road to Zambezi Street (2/2)
Zambia has the potential to serve as a trade hub at the crossroads of southern Africa, but for now some truck drivers have to wait days to cross the border. How is the Zambian government hoping to change this? Peter Day reports....

Civilian Drones
Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones. Could an unmanned aerial vehicle be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?...

The Road to Zambezi Street (1/2)
Zambia is poised on the brink of success – so what key problems are holding the African nation back? Peter Day reports....


Kit of Life
How come soft drinks can often be found in some of the most remote places in the world, but vital medicines are in short supply? Peter Day reports on a life-saving project....

Design Thinking
Peter Day finds out about the concept of 'design thinking' and how designers are moving out of the lab and into the real world in some very unusual ways....

Regenerating Margate
Peter Day explores the relationship between Commerce and Art in the seaside town of Margate. Will Turner Contemporary help to revive the town?...


Sir Ian Wood
Peter Day talks to Scottish businessman, Sir Ian Wood, who tells us his fascinating story of transforming the family firm from a fishing company to a global energy services group....

Gene Patenting
A recent US Supreme Court ruling found that companies cannot patent things found in nature. Peter Day asks what this means for the biotech business....

North Sea Oil
Peter Day reports from Aberdeen where Britain's energy revolution began under the North Sea almost 40 years ago. Investment is up but production is down - so what's the future?...


Kenya's tech hopes
The Kenyan government has big plans to boost the country’s technology sector. Peter Day asks if they are feasible – and if will they deliver the growth the government wants....

Mobile Money in Kenya
Peter Day visits Nairobi’s high-tech incubators and talks to the innovators building on the success of the mobile money system M-Pesa....

Entrepreneur of the Year
The annual Entrepreneur of the Year Awards brings together innovative talent from around the world. Peter Day talks to three of this year's winners to hear their start up stories....


Paul Omerod
Peter Day talks with economist and author Paul Ormerod about what is wrong with economics. Has keeping things too simple lead the world to the financial mess we are stuck in today?...

Designs For Life
Peter Day explores the new trend of Design Thinking to find out why it is becoming more important to the way organisations both public and private function....

Breakthrough Designs
Peter Day visits the Design of the Year Awards in London and finds how modern design is infiltrating many aspects of the way we live and work....


St Gallen
Peter Day attends the 43 annual St Gallen Symposium - a student organised gathering of business and political leaders - to hear about this year's theme: courage....

3D Printing/New Dimensions
Peter Day hears from the pioneers of the rapidly-advancing world of digital manufacturing...

Strike up the Broadband
The internet is fast becoming as important to firms as electricity or running water. Peter Day meets some of the broadband haves and have-nots in the business world....


Vorsprung durch Technik or Universitat?
Experts worry that Germany's economy is running out of steam. Where is German innovation, they ask and why do so few Germany universities rank among the world leaders?...

New Dimensions
Manufacturing is evolving for the 21st century. Peter Day hears from some pioneers in the field of digital fabrication about how it applies to the way we think about making things....

Feeding the Nine Billion
Peter Day asks a panel of experts how we ensure there is enough food to feed an expected world population of nine billion by 2050....


Job Search
Millions of young people want to work but do not know where to find it. A clutch of them tell their stories to Peter Day, and a panel of experts....

Potash of Gold
Peter Day reports on controversial plans to dig for polyhalite - a type of potash that can be made into valuable fertiliser - underneath the North York Moors National Park....


The Sick Note
From next year a government-backed scheme will try to help ill people get back to work as quickly as possible. Peter Day finds out what's behind the changes, and why they matter....

Productivity Puzzle
The UK economy is in a quandry: employment is rising but the productivity of its workforce is not. Behind the numbers, Peter Day tries to explain this puzzle and why it matters....


Race Against the Machine
Peter Day talks with the authors of the book Race Against the Machine and finds out what the rise of the robots is going to mean to all of our lives....

Mahindra&Mahindra
Peter Day talks to Anand Mahindra, the CEO of Indian group of companies Mahindra&Mahindra, about how M&M's story mirrors that of modern India, and how he led it to success....

India Identity
India is attempting to give each citizen get an individual identity. It’s the world’s largest technological project. Peter Day investigates....


India Economy
The Indian economy, once one of the world’s fastest growing, is stalling. This week’s Global Business examines the implications for the world’s largest democracy....

Ageing in Japan
Japan is the fastest ageing country in the world. As Peter Day reports, this is putting a big strain on the country’s finances. Will the Japanese have to work long into old age?...

Growing Old
As baby boomers turn 65, many countries are growing old. As Peter Day reports, this means big changes for the economy, healthcare, and our way of life....


Jeremy Grantham
Peter Day talks with the prominent investment manager Jeremy Grantham about managing progress in a world of finite resources....

Red Hook Brooklyn
Peter Day takes a walk through one street in Red Hook Brooklyn to find out how the community is recovering from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy....

The Art of Strategy
Peter Day talks about business strategy with the former head of Proctor and Gamble, AG Lafley, and Dean of the Rotman School of Management, Roger Martin....


The New Normal
Peter Day travels to the British Midlands, the country's manufacturing heartland, to find out how businesses are coping with the New Normal, an economy with no growth....

Gas Leak
Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy. Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Starting Young
Leave college, start a business. That is the idea behind a high-powered new project called Entrepreneur First, taking 30 new graduates through the hazardous first stages of launching their own companies. Peter Day charts the progress of some of them … from initial idea to plausible proposition, and beyond. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Jeremy Skeet...


Sounds Familiar
After years of promise, voice recognition is at last becoming a significant method of using computers and accessing the Internet. Why now, and what difference does it make ? Peter Day talks to the companies at the forefront of developments in the field (including Massachusetts-based Nuance, one of the largest makers of voice recognition technology), and asks whether our relationship with machines will change once we have the ability to talk to them. Producer: Neil Koenig Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

2013 Look Ahead
Peter Day talks to three experts from the field of trends, technology and leadership to find out what we will be hearing about in 2013....

The Business of Kindness
Random acts of kindness can help businesses grow in surprising ways. Peter Day talks with one woman who explains how the generosity of others has made all the difference to her company. Henrietta Lovell, the Rare Tea Lady, started her firm just before becoming seriously ill. Through the kindness of strangers she has managed to return to health and run a prosperous company. She is now a great advocate for spreading the idea that kind gestures are an important force in the way we conduct our personal and prof...


The Business of Kindness
Random acts of kindness can help businesses grow in surprising ways. Peter Day talks with one woman who explains how the generosity of others has made all the difference to her company. Henrietta Lovell, the Rare Tea Lady, started her firm just before becoming seriously ill. Through the kindness of strangers she has managed to return to health and run a prosperous company. She is now a great advocate for spreading the idea that kind gestures are an important force in the way we conduct our personal and prof...

Can The Co-op Cope?
Britain's venerable Cooperative movement is 168 years old, and now it is poised to turn itself into a major force in banking. But what is the Co-op's appeal to 21st century consumers? Peter Day reports. Producer: Lesley McAlpine Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Strong Medicine
Big problems loom over the pharmaceutical industry which influences so many people's lives. Giant corporations are beset by scandal and their pipelines of new treatments are running dry. Peter Day looks at the future of the industry through the eyes of two Swiss pharma companies, one very big and one of them tiny. Both are linked by their quest for a treatment for Alzheimers. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Jeremy Skeet...


Strike up the broadband
Peter Day visits businesses struggling with slow web speeds and evaluates the government's ambitious targets to increase internet speeds across the UK within three years. Producer: Mike Wendling Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Turkey (2)
Turkey is rethinking its’ geographical position in the world. In the second of his programmes on Turkey, Peter Day looks at the country’s new business and diplomatic relations with its neighbours in the Middle East and Africa in the light of decades of so far unsuccessful negotiations to join the European Union. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Strong Medicine
Big problems loom over the pharmaceutical industry which influences so many people's lives. Giant corporations are beset by scandal and their pipelines of new treatments are running dry. Peter Day looks at the future of the industry through the eyes of two Swiss pharma companies, one very big and one of them tiny. Both are linked by their quest for a treatment for Alzheimers. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Jeremy Skeet...


Turkey (1)
Peter Day reports from Turkey which is fast developing into a significant economic power. In the past two years, growth has reached 8% on a par with the economic might of China. How have they done it and can it be sustained. Join Peter Day on Global Business to find out. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Start Up City
Every city wants to become a high technology business hub, but ambitious entrepreneurs from all over Europe are rushing to set up shop in Berlin. So-called Silicon Allee is fast becoming a start-up rival to Silicon Roundabout in London. Peter Day finds out why. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Brooklyn Start-Ups
Peter Day reports from the New York City borough of Brooklyn, that used to be the city’s industrial heartland, and home to companies like the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer. Brooklyn’s manufacturing base has been in long-term decline, but now artisan start-up companies are making the borough hip again, and bringing new employment. Ironically, some are housed in the former Pfizer headquarters. Can they reverse Brooklyn’s industrial decline? Producer: Arlene Gregorius Editor: Jeremy Skeet...


On Their Metal
Peter Day travels to the Midlands to find out how beleaguered manufacturers are coping with the most difficult economy in decades. The region used to be the metal bashing heartland of the country but now manufacturers, service providers and entrepreneurs starting their own companies are all struggling to find a way to keep profitable in an era of low growth. What lessons have been learned over the past five years and how can the past help plan the way forward for the future? Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor:...

Start Up City
Every city wants to become a high technology business hub, but ambitious entrepreneurs from all over Europe are rushing to set up shop in Berlin. So-called Silicon Allee is fast becoming a start-up rival to Silicon Roundabout in London. Peter Day finds out why. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Silicon Somewheres
Peter Day asks how you create a high technology hub exploding with entrepreneurial activity. In other words how do you replicate Silicon Valley in the United States, elsewhere in the world? He asks whether there is a secret sauce to a successful hub. In this programme he discusses the development of hubs in London, Israel, Silicon Valley and Berlin. Producer: Caroline Bayley...


The Innovator's Dilemma
With innovation there are often unseen consequences. Managing what is expected and what isn't can make or break business leaders. This week Peter Day discusses the idea of the innovator's dilemma with celebrated business thinker Harvard Professor Clayton Christensen....

School for Entrepreneurs
Peter Day talks to the US enterprise teaching young school students to be entrepreneurs. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Jeremy Skeet...

Global Fashion 1
This week in Global Business, Peter Day is getting fashionable. He talks to 3 family owned companies one as famous for its campaigns as its brightly coloured sweaters, the second for its warm coats and the third is hoping to achieve global brand status from its Colombian home. Join Peter Day as he talks to Alessandro Benetton from Italy, Dani Reiss of Canada Goose and Yonatan Burstein of Totto; to find out how you keep a fashion company on top and your family happy. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Jeremy Ske...


A Great Disruption
Cries have gone up from all corners of the working world that things have got to change, that capitalism is broken and that the system can’t go on in the same ways as before. Calls for change are coming from every direction. This week in Global Business Peter Day talks to some twenty first century innovators who are trying to shake things up in the world of work, commerce and health. Could this be the start of The Great Disruption?...

Face the Music
Public spending cuts are putting a big squeeze on orchestras all over the world. Peter Day hears how musicians are trying to find new ways of ensuring that the bands play on. Producer: Ben Crighton...

Iceland (2) – Crisis Refugees
The Banking bubble in Iceland not only created a bust but it also took many of the bright young brains into its institutions. But when the banks crashed the jobs disappeared and this has now created a growing entrepreneurial sector. On this week’s Global Business, Peter Day meets some of the entrepreneurs who are creating opportunity out of the crisis and finds out whether a wealth of small businesses can really make a difference to an economy dominated by fishing, tourism and Aluminium smelting. Producer:...


In from the Cold - Iceland (1)
It is less than four years since Iceland was plunged into financial disaster. But now country is growing again. Peter Day finds out whether Iceland's speedy recovery has lessons for the other countries engulfed by the European crisis. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Emerging Markets
Peter Day talks to three experts about a new wave of companies with multinational ambitions springing up from the developing world. Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Iceland - In From The Cold
In 2008 Iceland's three main banks went bust plunging it into financial disaster. In Business reported on the crash in early 2009. Three years later Peter Day returns to Iceland to look at, what many see as its remarkable recovery. New banks have risen out of the ashes of the old, tourism and fishing are booming and the economy is growing again. Peter Day finds out if this small island nation has lessons for other countries caught up in the great Euro crisis. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Join the Crowd
Short of cash to start a business? More and more people are using the Internet to get customers or would-be investors to make their projects happen. Peter Day reports. Producer: Michael Wendling Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

A Great Disruption
Amid economic turmoil and diminished public trust businesses are coming under great pressure to change the way they work. Peter Day hears from some of the disrupters who think need companies need to embrace radically different ideas to survive. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

New Gateway
Britain is getting a new port on the River Thames near London, the first for many years. When London Gateway opens next year, it will be able to handle several million containers a year. Peter Day asks what impact this vast undertaking is likely to have on the way the country works and on the port's competitors. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Face the Music
Public spending cuts are putting a big squeeze on orchestras all over the world. Peter Day hears how musicians are trying to find new ways of ensuring that the bands play on. Producer: Ben Crighton Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Coal Comfort
Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel and the dirtiest. With insatiable demand from growing emerging economies, it's here to stay. Peter Day asks if coal can ever go green. Producer: Arlene Gregorius Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Join the Crowd
Short of cash to start a business? More and more people are using the Internet to get customers or would-be investors to make their projects happen. Peter Day reports. Producer: Mike Wendling Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Coal Comfort
Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel and the dirtiest. With insatiable demand from growing emerging economies, it's here to stay. Peter Day asks if coal can ever go green. Producer: Arlene Gregorius Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Computer Games 2
In the second of two parts on the rapidly developing business of mobile gaming, Peter Day is in conversation with writer Naomi Alderman and Adrian Hon, co-founder of games company Six to Start. They talk about how they took advantage of powerful phone technology to make the fitness chase game Zombies Run!, and they give insight into the changing world of mobile games and the increasing influence of games on the mainstream entertainment world. Producer: Mike Wendling Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

The Fizz Biz
There's a new boom in English sparkling wine. It is taking on Champagne and (sometimes) beating it. But what's behind the bubbles? Peter Day finds out from some of the top English growers ... and a select group of world wine experts on a pioneering trip into unknown territory. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Computer Games 1
Peter Day looks at the business of mobile gaming and how smart phones have opened up huge new markets for the industry. Including an interview with Mikael Hed of the Finnish company, Rovio, whose Angry Birds app has become a global phenomenon, with over a billion downloads. Also featured on the programme are Silicon Valley company Zynga, makers of the hugely popular Facebook game Farmville, and smaller developers from Italy, the USA and the UK. Producer: Mike Wendling Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

New Gateway
Britain is getting a new port on the Thames, the first for many years. When London Gateway opens next year, it will be able to handle several million containers a year. Peter Day asks what impact this vast undertaking is likely to have on the way the country works and on the port's competitors. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Euro Peril
As the euro struggles for survival, continental businesses are caught up in the crisis. Peter Day asks what they make of their plight and what sort of future they see for the single currency and the euro zone. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Japan Gone Grey
Japan is ageing faster than anywhere else, and the population is shrinking. 2012 is the crunch year as many of their baby boomers reach retirement age. How will Japan manage an economy where their healthy pensioners might survive at least another 20 years and younger citizens don't seem to want to have children? So how will Japan cope and who will pay the bill? Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Family Entrepreneurs
Peter Day reports from the Ernst & Young World Entrepreneur of the Year Summit, where he meets two entrepreneurs, one German, one Portuguese, who saved their respective family businesses from failing. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Euro Peril
As the euro struggles for survival, continental businesses are caught up in the maelstrom. Peter Day finds out what they make of their plight and what sort of future they see for the single currency and the euro zone. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


African Entrepreneurs 2
Peter Day finds out more about entrepreneurship in Africa by talking to three entrepreneurs who are tapping the continent’s vast potential. Producer: Michael Wendling Editot: Stephen Chilcott...

African Entrepreneurs 1
Peter Day finds out more about entrepreneurship in Africa from two men who took over failing local banks and turned them into leading financial institutions. Producer: Michael Wendling Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Japanese Work Culture
Japan has a very strict corporate culture which has been in place since World War II. In the 1970's and 1980's when Japanese companies were world beaters and manufacturing processes like 'just in time' were revered across the world companies like Sony and Nissan became household names. The world has moved on but Japanese corporate culture has not. Deference to your boss and no promotion until you are in your 40's is still the way business operates in government and big corporations. Risk is tantamount to...


Anne Glover
Peter Day talks with Anne Glover, an expert in spotting companies which excel at the process of frugal innovation and asks what this trend means for spotting successful ideas around the world. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Diaspora Bonds
Peter Day looks at the investment possibilities of diaspora bonds and how well off expatriates are trying to improve lives back home. Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Japan Gone Grey
This week Global Business is in Japan, a country that is growing old fast. In addition it’s population is shrinking too. Peter Day reports on Japan’s plans for dealing with the problem. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


For Sale
The art of selling goes back centuries and can be the difference between a company surviving or dying on the vine. Peter Day talks with author Philip Delves Broughton about how people often don't understand the basics of making a sale and how fundamentally important it is in all walks of life. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Called to Account
The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention … and why it matters to the rest of us. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Anders Dahlvig
Peter Day talks with the former CEO of Ikea about how the company's new ideas changed the way we all think about design and the impact it has on all our lives. Flat packs are now a standard feature in furniture shopping but how can the Swedish company which taught us how to assemble our own furniture build on its success around the world? Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Called to Account
The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention ... and why it matters to the rest of us. Producer: Caroline Bayley Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Through The Mill
The Lancashire cotton industry, in the north of England, was at the heart of the world's industrial revolution and the main engine of the British economy. Peter Day finds out how it struggles to survive. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Dragon's Den (2)
In the second of two reports from China, Peter Day looks at private financing. Until now a somewhat grey area of the financial market but crucial to the growth of their small and medium business enterprises. Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Bank to Basics
Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers. Peter Day asks what new arrivals on the high street have to do to prize loyal customers away. Producer: Lesley McAlpine Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Dragon's Den (1)
This week on Global Business Peter Day reports from China where political strife is in the news. But behind the headlines cracks are appearing in the country’s long economic boom. Or is it just business as usual? Producer: Julie Ball Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Frugal Feast
Big companies may have lots to learn from the cheap and cheerful improvisation which is commonplace in the developing world, particularly India. Peter Day discovers some of the secrets of what is now being called Frugal Innovation. Producer: Richard Berenger Editor: Stephen Chilcott...


Reverse Innovation
Peter Day hears about 'reverse innovation' – innovation that is adopted first in the developing world. Producer: Richard Berenger Editor: Stephen Chilcott...

Through The Mill
In the 19th century the Lancashire cotton industry was at the heart of the world's industrial revolution and the main engine of the British economy. In the 20th century it started a long decline. Today a few remaining textile manufacturers are finding ways of surviving huge global competition. Peter Day finds out how they are doing it. Producer: Sandra Kanthal Editor: Stephen Chilcott...