World Business Report

World Business Report Podcast

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

Update: Can Cinema Survive Covid 19?
Cinemas - along with other event spaces like theatres and live music venues - have had a tough time since lockdown. Cineworld made the announcement it was closing its doors a few days after the new James Bond film, No Time To Die, was delayed again until next Easter. That film was expected to bring in a lot of customers. But the truth is cinemas were struggling even before that announcement....

Cineworld temporarily closes UK and US cinemas
A dearth of film releases has led Cineworld to close more than 650 UK and US cinemas. Hannah Woodhead is associate editor of movie magazine Little White Lies, and assesses the current health of the movie industry. Also in the programme, on transfer deadline day for Europe's football clubs, and with some predictions of a potential 35% decline in spending by the continent's five biggest leagues, we examine the impact of coronavirus with football finance expert Kieran Maguire of the University of Liverpool. Pl...

President Trump could leave hospital on Monday
His doctor says Mr Trump is 'doing well' and has been given the steroid dexamethasone. The president briefly left hospital earlier to drive past the supporters who have gathered outside the Walter Reed Medical Center where he is being treated. We get the latest from Al Weaver, political reporter with The Hill newspaper in Washington DC. Entrepreneur and restauranteur Oliver Peyton tells us about his latest business venture - a new range of high-end canned cocktails. We ask him about the risks of launching n...


Trump moving to hospital
President Trump is being moved to hospital after being diagnosed with coronavirus, out of an "abundance of caution" according to the White House. We speak to Jenna Johnson, The Washington Post's National Political Correspondent. Meanwhile, the rate of unemployment in the US has fallen to 7.9%. But the jobless rate in the world's biggest economy is much higher than it was before the pandemic struck. We speak to Loretta Mester chair of the Cleveland Federal Reserve and member of the Federal Open Markets Comm...

President Trump tests positive for coronavirus
We gauge financial market reaction to the news US president Donald Trump has coronavirus. And Daniel Lippman, reporter at US news website Politico in Washington tells us how the development might impact the run-up to next month's presidential election. Also in the programme, from 2024 onwards, contenders for best picture at the Oscars will have to meet new rules designed to broaden the backgrounds of the people who worked on it, on both sides of the lens. Clayton Davis is film awards editor of the US entert...

Google launches News Showcase
Google today launched Google News Showcase. The tech giant will pay news publishers “to create and curate high-quality content” for Google News. We hear from Jeff Elgie, CEO of Village Media, a Canadian online news publisher that has signed up. Plus, Cary Leahy of Decision Economics on what's been moving the markets today....


Cocoa producing nations add price premium
Ivory Coast and Ghana have added a premium to the cocoa price to boost farmers' incomes. The countries produce around two thirds of the world's cocoa, and Michel Arrion, executive director at the International Cocoa Organisation in Abidjan explains how the so-called Living Income Differential is expected to work. Becky Forecast of the Fair Trade Foundation tells us it's too early to tell whether the change will increase the price of chocolate for consumers. And Ivorian cocoa farmer Kohi Amie discusses the i...

What to make of the first presidential debate?
Peter Spiegel, US Managing Editor of the Financial Times on the impact of and fallout from the first debate. Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors analyses the markets' reaction. Plus, the Bank of England's Chief Economist, Andy Haldane has blamed the media for emphasising the bad news about the pandemic and has called for more optimism. We ask Tali Sharot, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and author of The Optimism Bias, whether being optimistic can make a difference....

How dieselgate changed Volkswagen
As the first dieselgate trials get underway we examine the scandal's impact on Volkswagen. The former chief executive of its subsidiary Audi faces trial in Germany, and denies any wrongdoing. Jack Ewing of the New York Times in Frankfurt wrote Faster, Higher, Farther: How One of the World's Largest Automakers Committed a Massive Fraud, and reminds us how the story emerged. Ferdinand Dudenhoffer of the Centre for Automotive Research in Duisberg tells us boardroom culture at Volkswagen has now seen a major sh...


Presidential debate preview
In a few hours Donald Trump and Joe Biden will face each other in their first presidential debate. What, if any, difference will it make to the campaign? We hear from Peter Spiegel, the Financial Times Managing Editor in the US. And Brian Dorst of Themis Trading in New Jersey explains the potential impact on the markets....

Kenya eases coronavirus restrictions
Six months after their introduction, Kenya is easing strict coronavirus restrictions. The BBC's Ferdinand Omondi in Nairobi tells us about the economic impact of the coronavirus curbs. And Magdalene Wambui, owner of bar Ibiza Club, which is reopening, discusses how life has been for her and her employees over the past few months. Also in the programme, Epic Games, developer of Fortnite, is facing off in court against Apple over the fees the iPhone maker charges to app developers to appear in its app store....

Caesars Entertainment bids for bookmaker William Hill
British bookmaker William Hill received a takeover bid from US firm Caesars Entertainment. James Kilsby is USA vice president of Vixio GamblingCompliance, and explains how the changing regulatory picture in the US makes William Hill attractive to a US suitor. And we get wider context from Professor David Forrest of Liverpool University, who specialises in analysis of the sports and gambling industries. Also in the programme, some of the world's leading cement producers have made a public pledge to shrink th...


Donald Trump fires back at bombshell tax claims
The US President says claims he paid just $750 in federal income tax in 2016 are "fake news". Five weeks ahead of the US election, the BBC's Peter Bowes explains the significance of the story. Sri Lanka says it is sending 21 containers of waste back to the UK after they were found to contain hazardous material. Will Nichols at Verisk Maplecroft says it's part of a wider problem. Also, Swiss citizens have rejected a proposal to end an accord with the European Union allowing the free movement of people. We ex...

Update: Wall St waiting for news of covid vaccine
Chris Low of FHN Financial says markets expect to hear from pharmaceutical companies within the next two weeks on progress with a covid vaccine, and that could end the current period of flatness. We're rounding up a week of special programmes on the US election. We speak to Sarah Bryner, research director at the Center for Responsive Politics, in Chicago, about election fundraising and what all those dollars are spent on. And Marylouise Serrato of American Citizens Abroad tells us what US voters abroad are ...

Update: How will markets react to a second stimulus package?
As Nancy Pelosi suggests a second government stimulus package of $2.4 trillion, Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York explains how the market reacted. Also in the programme, all this week we're examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today we go to Ohio, and hear from the chair of its Democratic Party, David Pepper, and farmer Paul Kalmbach, who voted for President Trump in 2016....


Coronavirus: Israel tightens second lockdown to avoid 'abyss'
Israel is tightening its second nationwide coronavirus lockdown as case counts rise. Mehul Srivastava is Israel bureau chief for the Financial Times in Jerusalem, and explains the government's latest moves. And we hear how Israel's businesses could be impacted from Uriel Lynn, president of the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce. Also in the programme, all this week we've been examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today Rahul Tandon...

ILO: global jobs picture deteriorating
The International Labour Organisation says the impact of Covid-19 on jobs is worsening. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us details of their latest research. Also in the programme, continuing our series examining issues affecting voters in key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been taking a closer look at Florida. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how the pandemic is forcing breweries to adapt. (Picture: A jobs protest in Wa...


Update: Will the US get a second stimulus package?
Are politicians in Washington too preoccupied with a possible Supreme Court nomination to think about the need for a second stimulus package? We ask Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading. Also, we consider how agricultural tariffs, imposed by President Trump in his trade battle with China, may have impacted the vote amongst American farmers in Florida in a report from journalist Heather van Blokland....

UK restricts hospitality to combat coronavirus
UK prime minister Boris Johnson has announced new measures to tackle coronavirus. With new rules compelling the closure of bars and restaurants at 10pm, we ask Kate Nicholls, chief executive of the industry body UK Hospitality how the sector will cope. And Kim Sneppen, professor of biocomplexity at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen tells us how Denmark is handling a recent rise in coronavirus infections. Also in the programme, we're focusing this week on issues affecting voters in key battleground stat...

Update: US markets wobble on political uncertainty
The death of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg brings further uncertainty to markets, which were already feeling the uncertainty of the upcoming presidential election, as we hear from markets commentator Peter Jankovskis. Erin Delmore reports from Pennsylvania on the state's steel industry, and how a shortage of the metal is affecting some breweries, who badly need cans to package and transport their beer. And we hear how the coronavirus pandemic has affected demand for filming in one of America's m...


New European coronavirus restrictions
More than 800,000 Madrid residents were ordered to stay at home as Covid-19 cases rise. A number of European governments are considering stricter enforcement measures as they try to contain the pandemic, and a bar owner in Madrid tells us how the new restrictions are likely to affect his business. Also in the programme, leaked documents involving about $2tn of transactions have revealed how some of the world's biggest banks have allowed criminals to move money around the world. One of the cases shows that t...

Chinese apps get reprieve from US ban
As President Trump's deadline to ban new downloads of Chinese social media apps nears, he announces that a deal has been reached for US companies to take control of the video sharing site TikTok. Meanwhile users of the messaging service WeChat win a court injunction to halt the ban. We get the latest from Kim Lyons of the Verge. We also hear about the leak of more than 2,000 documents which seem to reveal serious failings in how the world's biggest banks deal with dirty money and Tim Alderslade, the head of...


US ready to ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday
TikTok and WeChat face a US install ban on Sunday, unless President Trump approves a deal. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman talks us through the latest moves in a long-running source of tension between Washington and Beijing. Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt asks whether environmental issues will have much of an impact on how people choose to cast their vote. Plus, we find out why this year's Indian Premier Leagu...

Update: Investors 'want more' from US Central Bank
Stock markets suggested the US Central Bank needs to do more to prevent a sell-off, after keeping interest rates unchanged, says Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York. Plus, we hear from a surgeon in Calcutta, India about how the record-high coronavirus cases in the country manifest in his working day - and why vaccine inequality might hit the country hard....


Update: Central Bank of US says 'no change'
The Federal Reserve keeps interest rates unchanged, which should help recovery as stock markets like subdued news and minimal changes, says Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in the US. We also look at why Warren Buffet - one of the world's biggest businessmen, is interested in the latest company to list on the US stock market: Snowflake. Plus, we hear from the dad who is taking YouTube Kids to court over its use of childrens' data - we speak with the BBC's Zoe Thomas for an overview, and parent Duncan McCann...

EU pledges further 15% greenhouse gas emissions cut
European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen delivered her first State of the Union. One eye-catching announcement was a pledge to cut Europe's greenhouse gas emissions by a further 15% by 2030. Sam Fleming is Brussels bureau chief of the Financial Times, and gives us an overview of the speech. And we get additional reaction from Bas Eickhout, a Dutch MEP who is vice-chair of the Green Grouping in the European Parliament. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa considers the role immigration...

Update: 'Buying the dip' in stocks as economies recover
As company share prices bounce around, many investors on the stock market take the 'buy the dip' approach - buying company shares when they are low, in the belief that they will rise again soon. It seems to be working for the moment, as government financial stimulus could end up in the right place at the right time, says Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey. Also, the United Nations warns on businesses ruining the biodiversity of the world. Finally, the World Trade Organisation calls the US's tariffs...


ADB: developing Asian economies will contract
The Asian Development Bank expects a contraction for developing Asian economies this year. Abdul Abiad of the ADB's macroeconomic research division in Manila explains it's the first time they've seen such a widespread contraction in nearly six decades. Also in the programme, as November's US election approaches, the BBC's Ed Butler has been discovering the coronavirus pandemic, coupled with the employment crisis it has triggered, has had a huge impact on families who have lost their health insurance coverag...

Update: Oracle confirms partnership with Tiktok
Video sharing app TikTok's parent ByteDance has rejected an offer from Microsoft to buy the firm, amid US national security concerns. Oracle has stepped in and has confirmed a partnership with the app. We speak to Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. And the BBC's Ed Butler takes a closer look at the impact trade between the US and China is having on the upcoming US presidential election. Plus we have a report from Ijeoma Ndukwe exploring the challenges business owne...

Chip designer ARM sold to Nvidia for $40bn
ARM's co-founder Herman Hauser has asked Boris Johnson to attach conditions to its sale. Dr Stephanie Hare is author of the forthcoming book Technology Ethics, and explains why the sale of the chip design firm is causing some anxiety in the UK. Also in the programme, US tech firm Oracle has confirmed that it is part of a proposal submitted to the US Treasury to work with Byte Dance, the parent company of the massively popular video sharing app TikTok. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani tells us about the background...


Why women are losing out during coronavirus
Why are so many women losing their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic? We hear from Karin Kimbrough, Chief Economist of Linkedin. One of the world's richest sports leagues kicked off this weekend - the English Premier League. But how much have its finances been hit by the coronavirus? And we hear about the real-life consequences of cancel culture....

Update: Fact vs. rumours in the Oregon wildfires
Misinformation about wildfires raging across the US state of Oregon has been rife on social media, prompting local officials to try to dispel the rumours. Journalist Shane Burley reports from Oregon on how these rumours are impeding journalists' ability to cover the fires. We'll also hear from Chris Low of FHN Financial in New York, wrapping up a week on the US stock markets....

Mining giant boss quits after historic cave destruction
Rio Tinto's boss is quitting after the destruction of Aboriginal sites in Australia. Patrick O'Leary is from the organisation Country Needs People, and tells us about the cultural importance of the sites destroyed by the mining giant. And we get further perspective on Jean-Sébastien Jacques' decision to step down from Aidan Davy, chief operating officer at the International Council for Mining and Metals. Also in the programme, the UK has finalised a trade deal with Japan, and we examine the significance of ...


Update: EU ultimatum to UK over withdrawal deal changes
The EU is demanding the UK ditches plans to change Boris Johnson's Brexit deal "by the end of the month" or risk jeopardising trade talks. The UK has published a bill to rewrite parts of the withdrawal agreement it signed in January. Jess Sargent of the UK Institute for Government explains the legalities of this move. Meanwhile the EU said this had "seriously damaged trust" and it would not be "shy" of taking legal action against the UK. Fintan O'Toole of the Irish Times explains what that means for the UK'...

Reducing the risk of work-related suicide
On World Suicide Prevention Day we ask how employers can prevent work-related suicide. Yvette Greenway-Mansfield's partner's daughter and a colleague both took their own lives. She helped