World Business Report

World Business Report Podcast

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

India's job creation conundrum
The world's largest democracy needs 10% growth just to create enough employment for the 12 million young people who enter the workforce each year. However, India's growth rate has dropped to its lowest rate in 6 years. Prime Minister Modi’s attempts to move way from a cash-based economy appear to have halted economic progress, with large numbers of highly-educated graduates searching unable to find work. Collapsing infrastructure has caused young entrepreneurs like Sumit Arora to move abroad in their search...

Update: What's next for Johnson's Brexit deal?
As a Brexit breakthrough moves markets, we get the detail on today's deal from Jennifer Baker, EU policy correspondent who's based in Brussels, and ask what's next for Boris Johnson's agreement. And what was the reaction on Wall Street? We get the latest from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York....


Climate change tops Canada's election agenda
Can the fourth largest global oil and gas exporter really pioneer tackling climate change? Nigel Cassidy examines if voters agree with this claim from current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as Canadians go to the polls next Monday. We hear from economist and climate activist, Naomi Klein and Anastasia Kogan, who lives in the mountainous region of British Colombia. Meanwhile, Jatinder Sidhu reports on the political temperature in Vancouver. As a Brexit breakthrough moves markets, businesses on both sides of t...

Update: Netflix results are out
Netflix has announced its results for the latest quarter; we hear from Brian Steinberg, senior tv editor for Variety. And Susan Schmidt from Aviva Investors brings us the latest from the financial markets....

The potential for hydrogen-powered cars
We examine the pros and cons of hydrogen-powered cars and ask if they will ever catch on. Hugo Spowers, chief executive of hydrogen car start-up Riversimple explains why his firm believes in the technology. We talk to Mike Petch, technical director of engineering firm Johnson Matthey, which runs a fuel cell development centre. Sophia Haussener of the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne tells us about technology they are developing to create hydrogen fuel without causing pollution. And Patricia Monahan,...


Update: Markets up on hopes of a Brexit deal
News of the days trading on Wall Street from Mark Kepner of Themis Trading in New Jersey. Plus BBC Technology correspondent Zoe Kleinman on the new Google smartphone, the Pixel 4....

Christine Lagarde's challenges at the ECB
There are challenges ahead when Christine Lagarde takes over at the European Central Bank. Her predecessor Mario Draghi has already restarted quantitative easing as the Eurozone seems headed back into recession. Markets.com's chief market analyst Neil Wilson explains how QE works, and Peter Brown, managing director of Baggot Investment Partners in Dublin tells us why he thinks it's a bad idea. Peter Praet who was until recently chief economist of the ECB makes the case for QE. And we get wider context from ...


Stephen Schwarzman talks to World Business Report
We talk to the billionaire chief executive of one of the world's biggest investment firms. What's the secret behind the success of Stephen Schwarzman and Blackstone? And how does Mr Schwarzman counter the criticism that his private equity company sacrifices long-term prosperity for short term financial gain? Also in the programme, Poland's governing Law and Justice party has claimed victory in Sunday's election. Jan Sienski from Politico was covering the count in Warsaw and tells us pledges to boost welfare...

Polish governing party set for election victory
The ruling Law and Justice party has clashed with the European Commission over migration and its attempts to gain more control over the judiciary. We ask the BBC's Adam Easton why the party is so popular with the electorate. Also in the programme, we speak to one Irish business owner about the potential costs of a hard Brexit. We also ask Professor Sarah Smith, chair of the Royal Economics Society women's committee, why it's important to get people from a range of backgrounds interested in the dismal scienc...


The challenge of dams
Whilst providing clean power, building a dam has significant environmental impacts. Ercan Ayboga is a campaigner with the Save Hasankeyf movement, and tells us why his organisation hoped to prevent the Turkish town of Hasankeyf being flooded by a dam project. Dr Barnaby Dye of Manchester University works with the Future Dams International research consortium, and discusses best practice in dam building. And Pai Deetes is a campaigner with International Rivers, who questions the purported benefits of dam con...

13th round of US-China trade talks under way
China and the US resumed trade talks in Washington on Thursday against a backdrop of heightened diplomatic tension. We get the latest from Bloomberg's Jenny Leonard in Washington, DC. Plus we examine the trade talks' impact on day's trading on Wall Street with Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York....

Does blockchain live up to the hype?
Blockchain is a technology behind cryptocurrency Bitcoin, but does it have other uses? Jessi Baker is founder of tech startup Provenance, and explains how the firm uses blockchain as a way of verifying the supply chain of companies selling products such as food and fashion. Avivah Litan of technology research company Gartner tells us where blockchain currently stands in its conception of the HypeCycle, which it uses to describe the life cycle of many new technologies. And we get wider context from Richard J...


Corporate sponsorship under pressure
We look in depth at the funding relationship between corporate sponsors and the arts. Last week in the UK in response to protests, the National Theatre ended its relationship with Shell, and the Royal Shakespeare Company pulled out of a funding deal with BP. The BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz tells us how significant corporate sponsorship is to arts organisations. We hear from a campaigner who has been targeting corporate sponsorship. Ros Sheldon of reputation management company Igniyte discusses how damag...

IMF and World Bank warn of deteriorating global outlook
The new leaders of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank have warned of a deteriorating global economic outlook. Today the World Bank published its World 2020 Development Report and we speak to its Chief Economist, Penny Goldberg. And trade talks have the power to shake the markets, as we hear from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey....


EU strengthens whistleblower protections
EU states have two years to bring in agreed new legal protection for whistleblowers. Robert McCoy is one such person who exposed systemic fraud over the award of contracts in the European Union, and tells us about the toll it took on his life to come forward. Virginie Roziere is a former Member of the European Parliament, who helped steer the new legislation through its various stages, and explains how complainants will be protected in Europe. And we hear from Paul Boyle, who was chief audit officer for the...

Update: General Motors strike knocks US economy
The strike has shut down GM production in the United States, as well as affecting its operations in Canada and Mexico. And a shortage of pork in China leaves US farmers sniffing for potential big orders coming their way. Plus, we hear what how the global stock markets responded to the tailwinds, from Peter Jankowskis of Oakbrook Investments in Illinois....

Ex-Deutsche Bank Trader: 'I'm being jailed - but the court was misled'
Matt Connolly speaks to World Business Report as part of a BBC investigation. The UK's top financial watchdog made statements for use in court that were later acknowledged by a senior official to be false, the BBC has discovered. The statements were used in a case against two ex-Deutsche Bank traders - Matt Connolly and Gavin Black - convicted of rigging interest rates. US government prosecutors submitted other statements that were acknowledged in court to be false or misleading. Both the US and UK authorit...


Unilever to halve single use plastics
Unilever plans to halve the amount of single use plastic it uses by 2025. We ask an environmentalist if this pledge is enough. The International Monetary Fund continues to offer loans to developing nations, which have run into financial trouble. We hear from Jubilee Debt Campaign group, who say that the IMF is encouraging banks to make risky loans to struggling nations, with the reassurance that their investment is safer. With Slovenian national carrier Adria Airways facing financial collapse, we enquire wh...

Update: Prince Harry sues UK tabloids in phone-hacking claim
The prince has begun legal action against the owners of the Sun and the Daily Mirror. We speak to Brian Cathcart, founder of Hacked Off, which campaigns for press accountability in the UK, as Buckingham Palace confirms documents have been filed over the alleged illegal interception. And we get the latest on the US markets with Chris Low of FTN Financial....

The business of dating
We take a look at the different business models set up to make money out of romance. Dr Holly Wood is an expert in online dating, and discusses the proliferation of dating apps. We hear from Verity Geere who wrote The Man Detox, which chronicles her journey through free apps, paid for matchmaking services and dating agencies. And we speak with Hayley Bystram, owner of executive dating service The Bowes Lyon Partnership. Also in the programme, our reporter in Lisbon looks at the economic arguments shaping th...


Morocco's tourism challenges
Tourism is a key source of income for Morocco, but it also brings challenges. Our reporter Matthew Davies takes a tour of the old souk in Marrakesh, and asks whether you can sometimes have too much of a good thing. Morocco's secretary of state for tourism Lamia Boutaleb tells us about the problems the collapse of British tour operator Thomas Cook has caused for hotels and other travel businesses. And we get wider context from Kamil Ennadifi, general manager of the Selman Hotel in Marrakesh, and Hamid Bentah...

Morocco's tourism challenges
Tourism is a key source of income for Morocco, but it also brings challenges. Our reporter Matthew Davies takes a tour of the old souk in Marrakesh, and asks whether you can sometimes have too much of a good thing. Morocco's secretary of state for tourism Lamia Boutaleb tells us about the problems the collapse of British tour operator Thomas Cook has caused for hotels and other travel businesses. And we get wider context from Kamil Ennadifi, general manager of the Selman Hotel in Marrakesh, and Hamid Bentah...


Update: US to impose tariffs on many EU goods
The US will impose billions of dollars worth of tariffs on European Union goods after the World Trade Organisation gave the go-ahead, in a long-running trade and subsidies dispute. Plus, we speak to Paddy Malone from Ireland's Dundalk Chamber of Commerce to hear his take on the latest on Brexit. And Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in the US gives us global stock market reaction....

The Japan-South Korea trade dispute explained
A trade dispute between Japan and South Korea has led to boycotts of Japanese goods. Robin Harding is Tokyo bureau chief for the Financial Times, and explains the root causes of the dispute. Troy Stangarone, executive director of the Korea Economic Institute in Washington tells us about the impact the boycott in Korea is having on Japanese exporters. And we get wider context from Sayuri Shirai, who is an economist at KO University in Tokyo. Also in the programme, the British government has presented the Eur...

Update: EU introduces appliance repair policy
The European Union seeks to end kitchen appliance breakdowns with 'right to repair'. Plus, Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey gives us the day's biggest movers and losers on the stock markets....


Update: EU introduces appliance repair policy
The European Union seeks to end kitchen appliance breakdowns with 'right to repair'. Plus, Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey gives us the day's biggest movers and losers on the stock markets....

Will robots help feed the world?
With a growing global population we hear about technology that will help feed the world. Lorenzo Giovanni is senior economist at the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation in Rome, and outlines the challenges farmers around the world are facing. Ben Crowther, co-founder of agriculture startup LettUs Grow, explains how their novel indoor growing scheme could benefit agriculture. And Sam Watson-Jones, co-founder of Small Robot discusses how micro robots could help make farming more efficient. Also in the prog...

Morocco's economic ambitions
We hear how Morocco hopes to become the investment gateway to the African continent. Nabila Freidji is vice-president of CGEM, the Confederation of Businesses in Morocco, and explains how it hopes to do that. Luxembourg's deputy prime minister, Etienne Schneider tells us why his country is opening a trade and investment office in Casablanca. We talk to some of the young unemployed people in Morocco for whom such developments have little impact. And Jihane Lahbabi-Berrarda discusses a scheme her organisation...


Conservatives set to return to power in Austria
Sebastian Kurz is set to return to the chancellorship with a strengthened mandate. But which party will he be in coalition with? The BBC's Bethany Bell tells us what's next. Also, why is the price of helium going up and up? We speak to consultant Phil Kornbluth. And, top poker player Liv Boeree explains the link between cyber security and Texas Hold 'Em....

Update: Teaching wellness to children
We hear from the school heads determined their pupils have mindfulness, and well being on the curriculum. Plus Chris Low bring us the latest from the financial markets....

The future of banking
With tech giants like Facebook getting into payments, we look at the future of banking. Helen Bierton is head of banking for newcomer Starling Bank, and discusses the pace of change in the industry. Todd MacDonald is co-founder of enterprise software company R3, which is backed by 40 banks, and explains how banks are aiming to cut costs. And Bianca Lopes, co-founder of the Talle Consultancy considers how traditional banks can stay competitive. Also in the programme, the French government has unveiled a budg...


Update: Peloton IPO off to a bumpy start
The cult fitness start-up Peloton started selling shares on the US market today and the IPO got off to a bumpy start as we hear from Cary Leahey at Decision Economics....

Can we trust artificial intelligence to be ethical in a war?
As the abilities of artificial intelligence continue to advance the defence industry is facing the challenge of dealing with the ethical question of computers deciding to kill the enemy in a war. Patrice Caine, the chief executive of the defence giant Thales, tells us it is a major problem deciding to trust AI, because the technology is surrounded by secrecy. We also hear from the BBC's Frank Gardner who has visited the oil facilities in Saudi Arabia, which were recently destroyed in drone attack, which he ...

Update: Juul boss steps down amid vaping concerns
The chief executive of vaping firm Juul, has stepped down, amid growing concerns around vaping health risks and criticism of its marketing. Katherine Foley of Quartz explains the significance of this for a shelved merger between Philip Morris International and Altria. And we'll also have a regular look at the US markets with Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago....


The challenge of a growing population
With Earth's population set to grow 25% by 2050, we ask how people will be accommodated. Hannah Olmberg-Soesman, co-founder of solar energy business Guguplex Technologies, Olivia Feng of software company ICAN Future Star, and Professor Klaus Lackner, director of the Centre for Negative Carbon Emissions at Arizona State University discuss the issues. Also in the programme, new UN research by more than a hundred scientists around the world warns of the increasing devastation climate change will inflict on coa...

Update: Democrats launch formal Trump impeachment inquiry
US Democrats have opened a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump over claims that he sought political help from Ukraine. The decision by top Democrat Nancy Pelosi follows growing demands from her party. Also in the programme, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful, the country’s Supreme Court has ruled. And celebrity French chef Marc Veyrat is suing the prestigious Michelin guide after his restaurant was stripped of the maximum three-sta...

Update: Democrats launch formal Trump impeachment inquiry
US Democrats have opened a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump over claims that he sought political help from Ukraine. The decision by top Democrat Nancy Pelosi follows growing demands from her party. Also in the programme, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful, the country’s Supreme Court has ruled. And celebrity French chef Marc Veyrat is suing the prestigious Michelin guide after his restaurant was stripped of the maximum three-sta...


Suspending UK Parliament was unlawful, court rules
We gauge business reaction to the latest development in Britain's Brexit process. Alastair MacMillan of White House Products and Cornelia Meyer of LBV Asset Management offer us their views. Also in the programme, following the failure of UK travel firm Thomas Cook, we consider the future prospects for mass market tour operators. Paul Charles of travel brand and public relations specialists The PC Agency gives us his perspective. Noel Josephides is chairman of the independent European company Sunvil Travel, ...

Update: Wall Street flat as investors pull back
Following the collapse of travel company Thomas Cook, we get analysis from Patrick Edmond of the travel advisor Altair. Also in the programme, the UN climate summit wraps up and Somini Sengupta of the New York Times reports on where countries stand with progress on climate pledges. And we'll have a regular look at the US markets with Peter Jankowskis from Oakbrook Investments in Chicago....

Update: Wall Street flat as investors pull back
Following the collapse of travel company Thomas Cook, we get analysis from Patrick Edmond of the travel advisor Altair. Also in the programme, the UN climate summit wraps up and Somini Sengupta of the New York Times reports on where countries stand with progress on climate pledges. And we'll have a regular look at the US markets with Peter Jankowskis from Oakbrook Investments in Chicago....


Thomas Cook collapses as rescue talks fail
Following the collapse of travel company Thomas Cook, we look at the long term impact. Michalis Vlatakis is chairman of the Association of Cretan Tourism and Travel Agencies, and explains how his members are likely to be affected. And for a wider picture, Oliver Gill, leisure and travel correspondent for The Daily Telegraph, tells us how companies linked to the failed operator will be hit. Also in the programme, as the United Nations Climate Action Summit gets under way, we hear from Greta Thunberg, the Swe...

Thomas Cook facing collapse
The future of package tour operator Thomas Cook is hanging in the balance amid last minute negotiations to save the holiday firm from collapse. The BBC’s transport correspondent Tom Burridge has the latest. On Monday world leaders will gather in New York ahead of the UN General Assembly to update their national pledges to reduce CO2 emissions. We’ll hear from a professor of climate and development as well as one small business on how hard it can be to go green. The 71st Primetime Emmy Awards are taking pl...

Update: Oil attacks increase tensions
We hear from Saudi Arabia to assess the damage to a key oil facility. Plus, we look at the latest moves on the stock market with Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in the US....


Vaping comes under pressure
With multiple countries banning electronic cigarettes, we examine the causes for concern. The BBC's Jagdip Cheema reports on the impact in Mumbai, as India becomes the latest country to introduce restrictions. Shane McGill of market research firm Euromonitor tells us some consumers are reverting to traditional cigarettes as vaping comes under pressure. And Dr Laura Crotty Alexander of the University of California San Diego discusses her research into the health effects of e-cigarettes. Also in the programme...

Update: Global climate change strike begins
More than 4,000 strikes are being held around the globe, starting in Australia. But what effect will they really have? We speak to California Senator Bob Hertzberg, who in a previous life as an entrepreneur, invested millions into renewable energy projects. And Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York brings us up to date on the day's trading on Wall Street....

The frustrations of credit card fraud
We examine how credit card fraud happens and what can be done to prevent it. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports on a case of fraud that happened to him. Katy Worobec of UK Finance explains how widespread a problem credit card fraud is. We get wider context from Lisa Jack, professor of Accounting and Financial Management at the University of Portsmouth Business School. And Zeeshan Feroz, chief executive of UK operations at Coinbase, tells us how his organisation tries to combat the problem. Also in the programm...


The frustrations of credit card fraud
We examine how credit card fraud happens and what can be done to prevent it. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports on a case of fraud that happened to him. Katy Worobec of UK Finance explains how widespread a problem credit card fraud is. We get wider context from Lisa Jack, professor of Accounting and Financial Management at the University of Portsmouth Business School. And Zeeshan Feroz, chief executive of UK operations at Coinbase, tells us how his organisation tries to combat the problem. Also in the programm...

Update: US Fed cuts interest rates again
The US central bank has cut interest rates for only the second time since 2008, this time amid fears about slowing global growth and trade wars. We get analysis from Mickey Levy, chief economist for the Americas and Asia for Berenberg Capital Markets in New York. And Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago tells us how Wall Street reacted....

The changing nature of pharmaceutical research
We find out how investor returns are dictating the nature of pharmaceutical research. Martin Hall is a neuropharmacologist and pharmacist who led a Cambridge research centre and is now at Hardman and Co, and explains how pharmaceutical giants focus on drugs with the biggest returns. Carl Sterritt is co-founder and chief executive of Shield Therapeutics, which has a promising iron tablet in the pipeline, and tells us about the challenges of bringing a drug to market. And Neil Clark, chief executive of Destin...


Update: Trump to block California emissions plan
As Donald Trump arrives in California, we talk to Kiran Stacey of the Financial Times about the President's intention to prohibit the state from setting its own vehicle emission rules. California has historically been allowed to have stricter standards, so what's behind the change? And Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey brings us up to date with the day's events on Wall Street....

Would you rent your clothes?
We ask whether clothing rental could help tackle the environmental impact of fashion. Alice Wilby is a sustainable fashion expert who lectures at the Central Saint Martin's College in London, and discusses the background. Elaina Simms is chief operating officer of MyWardrobeHQ, which offers clothing rental in the UK, and tells us why they believe it's a model that could catch on. And we discuss likely consumer interest in the idea with Samantha Conti, London bureau chief of the fashion industry's trade jour...


Saudi oil output halved after attacks
Oil prices surged by 20% before settling up 10% after an attack on a Saudi oil facility. Amena Bakr of Energy Intelligence in Dubai explains what is behind the gyrations. In the face of thousands of lawsuits over its opioid painkillers, Purdue Pharma has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. David Armstrong from the news organisation ProPublica discusses the background. Our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers what employers will do if their workers choose to join what is being billed...

Oil price spike after Saudi oil attack
Oil prices have spiked after drone attacks in Saudi Arabia have taken 5% of global supply off the table. Our expert Chris Weafer tells us why Saudi is still the world’s oil safety net, as nobody has the same capacity. Meanwhile, 50,000 United Auto Workers union members say they'll walk out, after General Motors fails to reach a new pay deal with them. And can Africa produce more scientists? We talk to those trying to encourage more to do scientific and engineer-focused careers across the continent. (Image:...

Oil price spike after Saudi oil attack
Oil prices have spiked after drone attacks in Saudi Arabia have taken 5% of global supply off the table. Our expert Chris Weafer tells us why Saudi is still the world’s oil safety net, as nobody has the same capacity. Meanwhile, 50,000 United Auto Workers union members say they'll walk out, after General Motors fails to reach a new pay deal with them. And can Africa produce more scientists? We talk to those trying to encourage more to do scientific and engineer-focused careers across the continent. (Image:...


Update: Felicity Huffman sentenced over college admissions scandal
US actress Felicity Huffman has been sentenced to 14 days in prison for her involvement in a college admissions scandal. The Desperate Housewives star admitted to paying $15,000 to have her daughter's exam answers secretly corrected in 2017. We hear from Judy Kurtz from US political website, the Hill. The Frankfurt Motor Show is underway; we get the latest from Joe Miller of the Financial Times. And Chris Lowe from FTN Financial in New York brings us up to date with financial markets in the US....

Indigenous communities talk climate change
Leaders from indigenous communities around the world converge to discuss climate change. Hosted by the Flourishing Diversity series at University College London, delegates from South America, Africa, New Zealand and more met to listen, exchange ideas and build solidarity. The BBC's Frey Lindsay went along on the last day of the event to see what they came up with. Also in the show, Paris is seeing huge jams and massive crowds on the few metro lines running as transport workers strike against planned pension...

Update: Businesses call for gun law changes
Bosses of 145 businesses have called on US authorities to control gun sales. Plus, Dr Cary Leahey from Decision Economics in the US updates us on day's movers and losers on the stock markets...


The future of diamonds
We examine the impact of synthetic diamonds on the market for traditional gems. Olly Williams, professor of experimental physics at Cardiff University, tells us lab-grown diamonds are now virtually indistinguishable from the real thing. David Prager is an executive at diamond mining firm DeBeers, and says he thinks there will always be a strong market for authentic stones. And we get a sense of how consumers are responding to the newer diamonds from Patrick Wyatt, who has been selling diamond jewellery for ...

Germany's economic health
With signs Germany may be entering recession, we look at how it might get back on track. The BBC's Theo Leggett is at the Frankfurt Motor Show, and tells us how German car industry leaders see their business impacting the economy. Stefan Kooths is chief forecaster at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy in Germany, and explains how his organisation sees the next few months panning out. And we talk to Erik Kirschbaum, a Berlin-based entrepreneur who owns several small-scale solar power plants, about how ...


The biometric future of shopping
As retailers encourage us to use biometric data for shopping, what is the likely impact? Cathy McCabe is a retail analyst for Proximity Insight, and tells us chain stores have to compete to survive in the race to optimise the shopping experience. Technology commentator Stephanie Hare considers the possible pitfalls of a reported move by online retailer Amazon to use a wave of the hand to speed up checkout. And Steffi Noel, researcher for Daxue Market based in Shanghai explains how much more advanced biometr...

British Airways pilots begin strike over pay
British Airways pilots begin a two-day strike over pay and working conditions. Aviation expert John Grant explains the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, we ask whether it's time for a new approach to economic forecasts. The Nobel prize winning economist Robert Schiller tells us it's time we stopped looking at just data, and start to take in to account the impact that narratives and stories that go viral can have on the economic landscape. Plus our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark g...


Leo Varadkar to meet Boris Johnson
On Monday Ireland's Taoiseach, or Prime Minister, Leo Varadkar, will meet his British counterpart Boris Johnson in Dublin. They're likely to discuss the thorny problem of ensuring free movement of people and goods across the island of Ireland after Brexit. We hear from Mark Kennedy, a managing partner with Mazars, an international accountancy and business advisory group in Dublin. Pilots at British Airways have started a two day strike, which has forced the carrier to cancel most of the roughly 850 flights ...

Update: Facebook and Google Investigated
Facebook and Google investigated for stifling competition, and we get the latest on the US stock markets with Chris Low of FTN Financial in the US....

Robert Mugabe's economic legacy
After the death of Zimbabwe's former leader Robert Mugabe, we examine his economic legacy. Matt Davies is a former editor of the BBC's Africa Business Report, and brings us up to speed. Also in the programme, as the beauty business continues to grow, we investigate the multi-billion dollar world of nail bars. Tanya Gupta, a director at Goldstein Research tells us how rapidly the industry is expanding. Meanwhile nail technician Ellie Tedder says in previous jobs she has seen Vietnamese women working seven da...


Update: Facebook expands dating service
Many wonder why Facebook didn't expand its dating service earlier - as Rebecca Jennings from Vox news explains, it's not as simple as one would expect in a world of privacy considerations. Plus, we hear the latest movers and losers of the day's stocks and currencies from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in the US....

Friends at 25
As US TV series Friends celebrates its 25th anniversary we examine the show's legacy. John Peek is a director of Television Audience Programme Evaluation, which helps distributors pick programming, and explains why Friends remains the most streamed show on Netflix. Paul Bassett Davies tells us how he cites the programme when teaching comedy scriptwriting. And Scacci Koul of Buzzfeed News argues that some of the show's humour has not aged well. Also in the programme, Craig Beaumont, director of the Federatio...

Update: No snap election to be called over Brexit
UK Parliament votes on a series of key points on Brexit, and we hear the reaction from Lesley Batchelor OBE, Director General of the Institute for Export and International Trade. And we hear the reaction on stock markets to news from the UK and Hong Kong, as Scott Nations from Nations Shares in Chicago explains....


Update: No snap election to be called over Brexit
UK Parliament votes on a series of key points on Brexit, and we hear the reaction from Lesley Batchelor OBE, Director General of the Institute for Export and International Trade. And we hear the reaction on stock markets to news from the UK and Hong Kong, as Scott Nations from Nations Shares in Chicago explains....

The future of Lego
We take an in-depth look at how toymaker Lego is adapting to survive in a digital world. Deborah Jaffe wrote The History of Toys: From Spinning Tops to Robots, and brings us the context. Nick Maynard of business consultancy Juniper explains how augmented reality apps on smartphones such as Lego's Hidden Side could be an important part of they toy industry's future. And we find out where Lego intends to go next from its chief executive Niels Christiansen. Also in the programme, financial markets rose sharply...

Update: WalMart to stop selling guns
The US's largest retailer has announced it will stop selling guns and some ammunition. Also, dramatic twists and turns in UK politics, as members of Parliament choose to take control of Brexit from Prime Minister Boris Johnson - the BBC's Jessica Parker updates us on what it all means. And what does this do to stock markets and the pound? From the US, Mark Kepner at Themis Trading gives us a markets check-in....


The challenge of living carbon free
We ask what steps people can take to move towards a carbon free lifestyle. Professor Susan Michie is director of the Centre for Behaviour Change at University College London, and explains how environmental warnings might persuade people to do things differently. Zoe Robinson, founder of The Good Wardrobe community styling hub discusses her organisation which aims to help people buy less but wear more. And Paul Levy, senior researcher at Brighton Business School considers the role technology can play in help...

Update: Fox gets into gambling
Rupert Murdoch’s Fox Corporation has launched Fox Bet in the US. We hear from Warwick Bartlett, the CEO of industry consultants GBGC....

Casualties of the US-China trade war
As the trade war between the US and China expands, we meet some of those impacted by it. Frank Leung owns a Chinese shoe factory in Dongguan, which sells 90% of its output to the US, and tells us how new 15% US import tariffs are affecting his business. Stephen Lamar of the American Apparel and Footwear Association represents US footwear companies, and explains how the import taxes are impacting his members. And Magi Raible, chief executive of LiteGear Bags in California, discusses how her business has swit...


Update: US GDP up by 2% in Q2
US GDP in the April-June quarter was boosted by consumer spending. We get analysis from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York....

US hits China with new tariffs
As China and the United States apply additional tariffs to each other's exports, prices are rising for American consumers. We get analysis from Freya Beamish, Chief Asia Economist at Pantheon Macro Economics. Argentina applies controls to the amount of foreign currency businesses can buy; the BBC's Daniel Gallas brings us the latest update. The new President of the European Commission, Ursula Von Der Leyen, starts work formally in Brussels on Monday. One of the biggest challenges will be reducing the power ...


India's roads feel the slowdown
As India springs the unpleasant surprise that its economy is now slowing down, we discover how the sluggishness has hurt a rural car industry supplier. Alpesh Patel, a trader and market watcher, tells us what investors are thinking about the subcontinent’s stabilisation – and the symptoms on the ground. Plus, an Amsterdam cannabis cafe owner tells us why coffeeshops like his are sticking to illegal drug suppliers - rather than join a trial to outlaw them. Finally, it will be precisely five years since the C...

Will AI take your job?
Artificial Intelligence is ever-present in our work and leisure lives; at a tech conference in Shanghai, two big tech names - the boss of Alibaba Jack Ma and the Tesla founder Elon Musk - were debating the merits of this pervasive technology. We look at the implications on jobs and the economy. Also, AI is often talked about as an impending revolution - when it’s really a continuation in the evolution of advances in computers’ abilities, as Tabitha Goldstaub, the co-founder of CognitionX, explains. Also in ...

Will AI take your job?
Artificial Intelligence is ever-present in our work and leisure lives; at a tech conference in Shanghai, two big tech names - the boss of Alibaba Jack Ma and the Tesla founder Elon Musk - were debating the merits of this pervasive technology. We look at the implications on jobs and the economy. Also, AI is often talked about as an impending revolution - when it’s really a continuation in the evolution of advances in computers’ abilities, as Tabitha Goldstaub, the co-founder of CognitionX, explains. Also in ...


Queen Approves Suspension of UK Parliament
Markets are reacting to the latest political bombshell in the United Kingdom, as the British Prime Minister suspends government to focus on Brexit. More famous names are being punished for their role in the US opioids epidemic, where over-prescription for the strong painkiller has been linked to many deaths. This time, Purdue - a pharmaceutical company owned by the Sackler family - has proposed a huge amount of money to settle the cases filed against them in court. And finally: after decades of decline… are...

Cigarette makers to merge in $200 billion deal
Philip Morris, which makes Marlboro, will merge with another cigarette maker, Altria. The two companies were part of the same company until ten years ago. So what's behind this latest deal? We speak to Jennifer Maloney who covers the companies for the Wall Street Journal. Is the International Monetary Fund still as relevant or successful in the modern age, and what we can learn from its latest successes and failures, from Greece to Pakistan? And we speak to the man who's using comedy and improvisation to i...

Why Johnson & Johnson were fined for being a public nuisance
We ask if this opens the door to a wave of pharma company prosecutions over misleading marketing. And, is the International Monetary Fund still as relevant or successful in the modern age, and what we can learn from its latest successes and failures, from Greece to Pakistan? Finally, forest fires are raging in Bolivia as well as Brazil – we look at the harsh consequences of agricultural expansion there. (Image: Johnson's talcum powder, a famous product by Johnson & Johnson. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty I...


Update: Johnson & Johnson fined $572m in landmark opiod ruling
The case involving the US drugs giant in Oklahoma could set precedents across the US. The BBC's Samira Hussein has been watching developments. Plus we hear from the NASA scientist who's been monitoring the spread of the Amazon fires - and we have the latest on the US markets after the G7 summit with Peter Jankowskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago....

Politicians Tussle Over Amazon Fire Relief
World leaders have been clashing over forest fires in the Amazon - we listen in on the G7 summit in Biarratz where world leaders are meeting, and hear more about the devastation the fires are causing. We'll also visit Venice to find out how the sinking city is coping with an inundation of cruise ships, contributing to 'overtourism'. And we'll take a look at the global cosmetics business - as many consumers demand a reduction in single use plastic, we find out what the industry is doing to cut down on waste....

G7 summit exposes differences between Europe and the US
The French seaside town of Biarritz has been on lockdown this weekend, as leaders of the world's big economies have been meeting to discuss several challenges, including ways to prevent Brazil burning rainforest to create farmland, with fires currently raging across the Amazon, the 'lungs of the Earth'. The summit has been overshadowed by global trade tensions, but on Sunday President Donald Trump revealed the United States and Japan have agreed a mutual trade deal. Vicky Pryce, Chief Economist at CEBR expl...


Update: Trump hits China with tariffs
The US has hit back at China in their escalating trade war raising tariffs in retaliation for Beijing's announcement earlier in the day of new duties on American goods. In a series of tweets President Trump said existing 25% tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods will increase to 30% starting on October 1st. We from the BBC's Zoe Thomas....

The dark world of online disinformation
Google has shut down 210 channels on YouTube it said were part of a "coordinated” attempt to post misleading material about the ongoing protests in Hong Kong. Twitter has also announced it would no longer allow ads from broadcasters who were financially and editorially controlled by governments, after facing severe criticism for allowing anti-Hong Kong ads to spread on the platform. This is just a small part of the online world of disinformation, spread by fake user accounts all across social platforms. On ...

"Everything is expensive" in Zimbabwe
Electricity cuts, water rationing and prices that are spiralling so high nearly a third of the population is facing a food crisis – we look at inflation in Zimbabwe. And tech giant Apple has a new payment card, which sounds simple enough. But the card isn’t friendly towards leather wallets or jeans pockets because it discolours them… and it can’t be kept with other credit or debit cards in case it damages them. In the UK, there are fears the $30bn horticulture industry could be at risk. A nation famed for i...


Trying to Predict a Recession
We look at one key indicator, the inverted yield curve, which has some economists worried that a recession could be on its way. A controversial gold mine gets the go-ahead in Armenia despite environmental concerns. And we hear from the project trying to tackle malnutrition in East Africa – Amar Ali, the chief executive of Improved Foods, tells us about his innovative way of getting high quality grains to Rwanda and Sudan....

Brexit fears for seaports
As Britain’s new-ish prime minister has written to leaders of the European Union saying he wants the UK to leave the EU in just over two months’ time – with a deal if one can be agreed. PM Boris Johnson, a cheerleader for Brexit, repeated his pledge that the UK will leave with or without an agreement on October the 31st. Many in business have long been concerned about the potential for disruption at the sea ports that connect the UK to continental Europe if there’s a no deal exit. Rob Young attempted to wor...


What will happen at UK ports after Brexit?
With a no-deal Brexit looking more likely every day, various parts of UK industry are preparing for the potential disruption. Rob Young speaks with representatives of shipping, ports, freight, haulage and business to get a sense of whether, and how smoothly, trade will flow between the UK and Europe on 1st November. Italy's prime minister resigns as another political crisis unfolds. Could this lead to early elections? We speak to journalist Sabina Castelfranco who's been following events in Rome. And our re...

Update: Twitter removes controversial Hong Kong accounts
Accounts removed included those thought to be 'stoking discontent' at Hong Kong protests. Plus, we get the latest movers and losers of the day's stock markets from Peter Jankovskis from Oakbrook Investments in the US....

The new gold rush
Around the world political tension is rife, financial markets are sinking and economic signs are pointing to a downturn. It is during times like these that investors flock to so-called safe havens like gold and US government bonds. But times are changing - and an increasing number of people are also putting their money into digital currencies like Bitcoin. Also in the programme: Chinese telecoms giant Huawei is thrown a temporary lifeline by the US Department of Commerce, and our workplace commentator Pe...


Sudan: Army and civilians seal power-sharing deal
Sudan's competing political elites have signed a power-sharing agreement that should navigate the country away from military rule and towards democracy. We get analysis from Sally Nabil, the BBC's Arabic correspondent in Khartoum. French President, Emmanuel Macron meets his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin later today. We hear from Eric Chaney, economic adviser to the Institut Montaigne and former chief economist at Axa. On Monday the United States Trade Representative starts hearings in an investigatio...

Update: Sudan to get new government
After months of street protests in Sudan intermittently curtailed by extreme violence on the part of the military government and its paramilitary allies, a new, semi-civilian government is to be sworn in this weekend. We hear from Dr Sara Abd-al-Jalil, a representative of the Sudan Professionals' Association. Plus, Chris Low from FTN brings us the latest from the financial markets....

Tackling forest fires
Wildfires around the world are becoming more and more frequent and intense. We join firefighters on the ground in southern France and hear what they're doing to tackle the problem from a 45m high tower right in the heart of the Landes du Medoc forest. We speak to the head of the region's fire brigade and a volunteer fireman. Also in the programme, as demonstrators protest in Hong Kong for the eleventh week in a row, we hear how this has affected its economy and businesses. We speak to businessman Victor wh...


Tackling forest fires
Wildfires around the world are becoming more and more frequent and intense. We join firefighters on the ground in southern France and hear what they're doing to tackle the problem from a 45m high tower right in the heart of the Landes du Medoc forest. We speak to the head of the region's fire brigade and a volunteer fireman. Also in the programme, as demonstrators protest in Hong Kong for the eleventh week in a row, we hear how this has affected its economy and businesses. We speak to businessman Victor W...

Stock markets stable after China trade warning
Stock markets around the world have stabilised, after fears of a slowing global economy sparked a big sell-off on Wednesday. We get analysis from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York. And we look at the hype around 3D printing and why it hasn’t lived up to its reputation – it turns out the machines used too much electricity, the materials were expensive and sometimes printing items took far too long....

Argentina’s Historic Market Crash
As Argentina reels from the biggest market crash in its history, we find out how it’s affecting the population - and what the government is doing to fight it. In Italy, the ruling party simply could not work with its coalition partner. As our correspondent in Rome, James Reynolds, finishes a five-year stint there, we find out about the power tussles and the imminent vote of No Confidence that could derail the government. How has the political and economic landscape changed in the last five years? And we loo...


Argentina's Macri unveils economic 'relief' measures
Argentine President Mauricio Macri has announced a series of "relief" measures, days after a defeat at the polls triggered economic turmoil. He announced income tax cuts and increases in welfare subsidies. Petrol prices will also be frozen for 90 days. But will they work? A question for Jimena Blanco, Head of Latin America Research at the global risk consultancy Verisk Maplecroft. Plus, we get the analysis on the day's trading on Wall Street from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors, in Chicago....

The kink in the food delivery business
Food delivery services are growing, as appetites for home-delivered food make way for a burgeoning side-hustle that benefits young people especially – but competition to make the most money sees some delivery giants pulling out of key markets; we check in with the big movers and losers of the delivery revolution. Germany’s economy has contracted – we look at why its woes may only get bigger, as talks of recession are on people's lips, and what a decline in German business activity might mean for the rest o...

Update: Hong Kong Protests - business and economic impact
Hong Kong International Airport saw chaotic scenes on a second consecutive day of massive anti-government protests that have paralysed one of Asia's key transport hubs. The protests are part of the ten-week stretch of widespread demonstrations. So how are businesses dealing with the disruption and what is the impact on the economy? We hear from our reporter Leisha Santorelli, herself born in Hong Kong. Plus, Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey on Trump's 'early Christmas present' - delaying further ...


Improving female diversity in the entertainment industry
This month, the British Film Institute in London is launching a festival aimed at showcasing black talent. But is the industry doing enough to promote women of colour in lead roles? We speak to three women who are pushing for change on the silver screen and theatre stage. Also in the programme: Markets are rattled after voters reject Argentinian President Mauricio Macri's economic reforms and cast their ballot for a more populist candidate in the country's primary elections. And our workplace commentator g...

Argentine stocks and currency plunge
Argentine stock markets and its currency have both plunged after conservative Argentine President Mauricio Macri suffered a shock defeat in primary elections on Sunday. The peso fell 15% against the dollar on Monday after earlier plunging around 30% to a record low. Some of the country's most traded stocks have also lost around half of their value in one day. We get analysis from the BBC's South America Business correspondent Daniel Gallas and Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago....

Cleaning the internet is 'the worst job in the world'
There is a lot of illegal and disturbing content on the internet. But have you ever wondered who has to remove it? Silicon Valley's biggest social media companies -- including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube -- employ tens of thousands of people to weed out the content. But as the BBC's Ivana Davidovic found out, many are employed by subcontractors in India and the Philippines, and are paid wages well below the average tech employee in Silicon Valley. We hear from former US-based moderator Shawn Speagle who...


Guatemala heads to the polls
Voting is underway in Guatemala for the final round of the presidential election. The two candidates in the run-off have both stood for the presidency before. Guatemalans have cited insecurity as their main concern, followed by unemployment, high living costs and corruption. Mozambique’s main opposition party and the government have signed a peace agreement to end years of intermittent conflict. The hope is that this could transform both the economic fortunes of the country and benefit supporters of both gr...

Ethiopia: Africa's latest economic miracle?
For decades, Ethiopia was troubled by war and famine, largely cut off from the world’s economy. But now it is Africa's fastest growing economy and last month, non-citizens were allowed to start investing in the country for the first time. There are still problems - ethnic conflict last summer displaced more than two million people. There has been an attempted coup and government internet and phone network shutdowns are common. So will diaspora return and investment flow to Ethiopia? We speak to potential in...


UN urges reform to food production
The UN has said humans need to reform food production methods to combat climate change. Evan Fraser is director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, and discusses how to avoid poor harvests. Tom Bradshaw of Britain's National Farmers Union explains how farmers are coping with an unpredictable climate. And we get further analysis from Professor Aled Jones of the Global Sustainability Institute at Anglia Ruskin university. Also in the programme, we hear from executive chairman Pablo Isla ...


How effective are product certification schemes?
We hear about possible problems with schemes designed to certify commodity production. An Ivory Coast cocoa farmer tells us why he regrets having his plantation certified. Anne Marie Yao is West Africa cocoa manager for Fairtrade Africa, and explains some of the challenges the industry faces. Patrick Mbataru, a coffee specialist at Kenyatta University in Nairobi says some farmers are giving up growing coffee altogether. And Allison Marie Loconto of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation discus...

Germany's economic challenges
There are fears that the global trade war might tip Germany's economy into recession. Marcel Fratzscher is the president of the research institute DIW Berlin, and thinks Germany may already have reached that point. Danae Kyriakopoulou is the chief economist at the think tank OMFIF, and explains the significance of Germany's economy to the rest of the continent. And Klaus Deutsch, head of economic and industrial policy at industry group the BDI tells us why Germany's automotive sector is currently struggling...


Would we benefit from a digital detox?
We ask whether technology has become too dominant a force in our lives. Jodi Whelen owns the August First Cafe and bakery in Vermont, where there is no wifi and computers are banned. She tells us it was the best thing she's ever done for her business. Entrepreneur Sanoussi Keita in Monrovia, Liberia, says people there are keen to get more technology in their lives. And Mother Hildegarde, secretary general of the Tyburn Convent in London explains that technology is creeping in to their setting, despite effor...

Japan and the US close to a trade deal
A free trade deal between Tokyo and Washington could be signed within weeks. It could mean American farmers will soon be exporting meat and dairy products to the Asian nation, while Japanese automotive companies would continue to enjoy sales in the US without the threat of tariffs. We speak to Yuichiro Nakajima, managing director of Crimson Phoenix, a Japanese business advisory firm. The Caribbean island of Puerto Rico has been close to bankruptcy for years, but could Pedro Pierluisi, the new governor of t...


The business of hair
We examine the global marketplace for human hair and hear why some think it is unethical. Dan Choi runs Remy, a company in Vietnam which sells hair extensions around the world, and explains his business model. And Christina Adesina of Fair Hair Care discusses some of the problems with the industry. Also in the programme, South Korea has accused Japan of waging an economic war, as both countries place further trade restrictions on each other. Our Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani describes the ori...

Extra $2.5bn for no-deal Brexit planning
With just 91 days til the UK is due to leave the EU, we ask how prepared businesses are. Alistair MacMillan set up White House Products which sells hydraulic pumps to 120 countries, voted for Brexit, and is fairly relaxed about the prospects for trade. Helen Roberts of the National Sheep Association in Wales discusses the impact tariffs on lamb could have on exporters. And we examine the costs and benefits of Brexit with Roger Bootle of Capital Economics, and Jonathan Portes, who runs UK in a Changing Europ...

Update: US interest rate cut
The US central bank has cut interest rates for the first time since 2008. We hear from Randall Kroszner, Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Booth Business School, and a former member of the Fed's Board of Governors. We also get analysis from the BBC's Michelle Fleury. Chris Low from FTN Financial sums up the market's reaction....


The business of weather
As climate change brings extremes, we hear how weather data can boost business profits. Leon Brown is chief meteorologist of the Weather Company, and explains how its data gets used by companies. Jon Weaver is head of marketing for the south coast resort of Bournemouth, and tells us an inaccurate forecast of rain for a public holiday weekend last year led to a 40% decline in visitors. And professor John Selker of the Trans-African HydroMeteorological Observatory discusses the potential benefits to farming a...

Empowering disability in the workplace
We ask whether big companies are doing enough to enable workers who have disabilities. We meet people at the Clarity soap and bath products factory in London, where 80% of employees have a disability. Caroline Casey is a social entrepreneur and founder of the Valuable 500, who explains how she's persuading businesses around the world to commit to putting disability inclusion on the agenda at company board level. And Jill Houghton, chief executive of Disability IN, a non-profit organisation based in Washingt...

The future of television
As cable TV subscriptions fall in favour of streaming we look at the future of television. Kay Koplovitz built up USA Networks in the 20 years from 1977, and offers us her take. Chris Bishop is head of programming at CNBC Africa, and tells us how things are developing on that continent. And we get wider context from media and telecoms analyst Paolo Pescatore. Also in the programme, our reporter heads to the port of Plymouth in the UK to hear about a proposal to set up a 'coastal powerhouse' to attract atten...


Trade talks to continue between the US and China
US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will travel to Shanghai to continue trade talks with China in an effort to end the so-called “trade war” between the two countries. Stefan Legge of the University of Saint Gallen in Switzerland and Anahita Thoms, from the law firm and advisory group Baker McKenzie weigh in on how the trade war has already hit the global economy, and how much longer it’s likely to go on. Budget airline Ryanair will unveil its financial perfor...

Update: US GDP slows in Q2 but is stronger than expected
The US's GDP in April-June was up by 2.1% on last year. Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago tells us what this means for the country's economy and how investors have reacted. And Fortnite - arguably the world's most-played computer game - kicks off its world cup in New York. There are huge cash prizes at stake and competitors have been practising for as much as eight hours a day in preparation. Is this the future for e-sports? We speak to Rachel Weber, managing editor of GamesRadar. (Picture: A wo...

The impact of climate change on farming
As Europe endures a heatwave, we examine the impact of climate change on food production. Deepak Ray of the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota describes the changing agricultural picture around the world. The president of France's largest farmers' union FNSEA argues that a €1bn compensation package for French farmers currently enduring drought conditions is not sufficient. And Kit Allen and Fred Langdale of Extonpark vineyard in the south of England explain how a warmer climate in t...


Update: Amazon and Alphabet release quarterly earnings
Amazon's profits fail to beat expectations, but Google's parent company fares better. We get analysis from our business correspondent Michelle Fleury in New York, while Cary Leahey of Decision Economics gives us investors' reaction to the results. (Picture: Amazon packages. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)...

The challenge of childcare
We take a look at childcare policies in different parts of the world. We hear from working parents in the UK and Nigeria about the challenges they face in funding childcare. Sally Boyle is international head of human resources at the investment bank Goldman Sachs, who explains why they have chosen to offer on-site daycare in many of their offices. And Fabienne O'Neill, co-founder of co-working space with a flexible nursery Cuckooz Nest tells us how its scheme might catch on. Also in the programme, chief exe...

Update: Markets react to Boris Johnson appointment
As Boris Johnson takes over as UK prime minister, we consider the economic challenges that lay ahead, with Helen Thomas who was an adviser to former UK chancellor George Osborne and now head of the Blonde Money consultancy. And we'll get a view on the US markets from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors....


Boris Johnson's economic challenges
As Boris Johnson takes over as UK prime minister, we consider his economic challenges. Sonia Pernell is author of Just Boris: A Tale of Blond Ambition, and tells us who Mr Johnson is. Professor Jagjit Chadha, director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research considers what a potential 'no deal' Brexit, mentioned frequently in the prime ministerial campaign, would mean for the country. And Kate Andrews of the Institute of Economic Affairs discusses how likely it is that the UK will quickly s...

Update: Boris Johnson becomes next UK prime minister
The former foreign secretary said he would deliver Brexit by 31 October. We get analysis from Stephen Pope, finance professor and Forbes columnist. And Mark Kepner of Themis Trading in New Jersey tells us how Wall Street reacted to news of a US-China trade meeting on Monday....

The race to combat Ebola
Despite available vaccines, the latest outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo shows no sign of being contained. Dr Josie Golding at the Wellcome Trust describes the challenges involved in rolling out an effective vaccine in the conflict-ridden country. Dr Paul Stoffels is chief scientist at Johnson & Johnson, which has developed one of the available vaccines. He tells us how 9/11 helped spur the company into developing the inoculation. Also in the programme, Boris Johnson will become the UK's...


Tensions high amid Strait of Hormuz seizure
The importance of this Gulf waterway and how disruption to shipping there affects us all. Rocky Weitz is director of the Fletcher Maritime Studies Programme at Tufts University in the United States, and tells us why the Strait is so significant for international shipping and trade. Energy analyst Cornelia Meyer explains the likely impact of rising tensions on the price of energy. And John Thompson, Managing Director of maritime security firm Ambrey, discusses how the global shipping industry will be affecte...

Volodymyr Zelensky set to win Ukraine elections
Volodymyr Zelensky's party is set to convincingly win a snap parliamentary election in the Ukraine. We get the latest from the BBC's Steve Rosenberg. Saudi Arabia is building one of the world's largest tourism destinations, aimed at persuading Saudis choose to stay inside the nation and therefore spend their money in the domestic economy. We speak to the Chief Executive of the project, Michael Reininger. Kenya continues its crack down on online gambling as it looks to combat a rising tide of addiction among...

India's space ambitions
As India prepares to launch a second mission to the moon, we ask if it's money well spent. Sinead O'Sullivan is a space economist at Harvard Business School, and tells us India's Space Research Organisation operates more like a startup compared to some other countries' space agencies. Dr Chaitanya Giri, planetary scientist at the Gateway House research institute in Mumbai, argues that India's space programme brings clear economic benefits. And space entrepreneur Dr Susmita Mohanty says that having a space p...


The US House passes $15 minimum wage bill
The US House of Representatives has voted to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025, delivering a long-sought victory to liberals. However, it remained unlikely the bill would pass a Republican-controlled Senate. Labour economist Anna Godoy explains how effective is paying the lowest earners more in economic terms. Also in the programme, we look at the fluctuations of the Pound caused by Brexit uncertainty. Plus, we examine the challenges faced by organisations targeted by computer ransomware...

The dangers of ransomware attacks
We examine the challenges faced by organisations targeted by computer ransomware attacks. Monroe College in New York is dealing with one right now, as its director of public affairs Jackie Ruegger explains. Connecticut-based Coveware helps businesses tackle such attacks, and its chief executive Bill Siegel tells us about the latest strain of software being used to lock computers in exchange for a ransom payment, called RYUK. He also discusses the arguments for and against giving in to such demands. Also in ...

How safe are electric scooters?
The UK's first electric scooter fatality highlighted the risks involved with the devices. Richard Corbett is head of rental scooter operator Bird in the UK, and argues that scooters solve many transport problems. Michael Hurwitz is director of innovation for Transport for London, and explains why they are illegal to use on roads in the UK. And Itzik Ben Aharon of the Scootin' push scooter company in the UK tells us why he'd like to see that law changed. Also in the programme, memory chip prices have soared ...


US Congress takes on big tech over antitrust
America's best known companies - Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple - have faced attacks on all sorts of fronts - whether it's over the use of personal data, stifling competition, allowing copyright infringement or paying too little tax. Now they're in Washington defending what they do in front of committees of politicians. We hear from Karen Kornbluh, director at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and former US ambassador to the OECD. We also speak with mayors who are defying national immigratio...

Mayors on immigration
We speak with mayors who are defying national immigration policies around the world. Beppe Sala, mayor of Milan explains why he is dismayed by the direction Italy's national government is taking on migration. Eric Garcetti, who is mayor of Los Angeles tells us why he is taking a stand against Donald Trump's national policies on the issue. Marvin Rees, mayor of Bristol, explains changes he'd like to see made to the UK's asylum system. And Yvonne Aki Sawyer, mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone, discusses the impa...

Update: Huawei announces investment in Italy
Huawei announces significant investment in Italy despite America urging other countries not to do business with the Chinese technology firm. We hear from Adam Seagal, the director of the Digital and Cyberspace Programme at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. And there's been uproar in New York as Central Park holds a festival which charges an admission fee. Cory Kilgallen, a reporter with the New York Times tells us that people are unhappy about the erosion of a long held tradition. Plus, Peter ...


Chinese economic growth slowest since 1992
China's economy has been slowing despite Beijing's efforts to cut tax and boost spending. Iris Pang is a greater China economist at the bank ING in Hong Kong, and tells us what's behind the slowdown. And we get more context from Andrew Coflan, China analyst at the political risk consultancy Eurasia in Washington. Also in the programme, former South African president Jacob Zuma has come out fighting, as he appears before a judicial inquiry to deny he was involved in corruption during his time in power. We ge...

Turkey continues gas exploration in disputed waters
The EU considers sanctions against Turkey over its exploration for gas in disputed waters around Cyprus. We hear from James Ker-Lindsay, a visiting professor at the London School of Economics. Last year China landed a rover on the dark side of the Moon and India is close to launching its second lunar mission; we hear from Doctor Becky Smethurst from the university of Oxford and the author of a book on the Indian space programme, Gurbir Singh, tells us more. Azuri Technologies, which has designed a solar pow...

World's biggest brewer AB InBev cancels its IPO
The world’s biggest brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev has suspended plans to list its Asian operations in Hong Kong. The initial public offering was expected to overtake Uber as the world’s biggest share sale this year. The company said weak market conditions were to blame for its decision. We get analysis from our business reporter Leisha Santorelli. Also in the programme, today marks five months since the Republic of Macedonia in Southeast Europe was officially renamed the Republic of North Macedonia, following...


Thomas Cook in rescue deal talks
Travel company Thomas Cook is in rescue deal talks with banks and its largest shareholder. Aviation expert Jens Flottau tells us where things have gone wrong for the company. Also in the programme, today marks five months since the Republic of Macedonia in Southeast Europe was officially renamed the Republic of North Macedonia, following a dispute with neighbouring Greece over the name. We get reaction to the move from people in the town of Ohrid in North Macedonia. Alexandra Voudri, diplomatic affairs edit...

The last VW Beetle rolls off the production line
After 80 years in production, VW halts production of the iconic bug-shaped car. We speak to Beetle enthusiast and historian Professor Bernard Rega of Leiden University in the Netherlands. And we hear from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics on today's happenings on Wall Street....

The French Tax Revolution
The French parliament has passed a law that will impose a new tax on large internet firms. French lawmakers went ahead despite the threat of retaliation from the US, which believes the law will unfairly target US companies. Roland Lescure is a member of the French parliament for the ruling La Republique en Marche party, and tells us what the new tax hopes to achieve. Oxfam's tax policy specialist in France, Quentin Parrinello discusses the French government's strategy with tech firms. And Daniel Bunn, direc...


Federal Reserve chairman addresses Congress
Jerome Powell hinted at a cut in interest rates as he gave evidence at a hearing in Washington, and said that he fully intended to serve his four-year term at the US's central bank regardless of what President Trump asked him to do. We get market reaction on today's proceedings from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors, who's been following events from New York. And we speak to Los Angeles ice-cream seller Joe Nicchi, who's so fed up of so-called social influencers requesting ice-creams for free that he's charg...

Problems at South Africa's state-run power company
Woes at South Africa's power company Eskom are occupying the country's parliament. Roland Henwood of the University of Pretoria tells us how the firm has built up $30bn in debt. Ted Blom is an energy expert who worked for Eskom, and argues that a government break-up plan for the company might not be the best solution. And Jan Oberholzer, chief operating officer for Eskom, explains how the business sees itself turning things around. Also in the programme, Mexico's finance minister Carlos Urzua has resigned, ...

Mexico's finance minister resigns
Carlos Urzua was a key figure in the government of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, which has only been in power for a few months. We speak to Nancy Gonzalez, senior business reporter for the business news website and magazine Mexico Now, about why he quit his post. And Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey explains why it's been a quiet day on Wall Street. (Picture: Carlos Urzua. Credit: Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)...


Developments in elderly care
We look at elderly care as a conference discusses the 'silver economy' in Helsinki. Professor Chris Alford of the University of the West of England demonstrates an autonomous vehicle aimed at senior citizens. Bethan Harris is the director of Collectively, and explains her organisation's approach to changing building design to stop isolation. The former prime minister of Finland, Esko Aho, discusses his country's approach to alerting the world to the challenges and opportunities of an ageing population. And ...

Deutsche Bank to cut 18,000 jobs
Germany's Deutsche Bank is retreating from investment banking in a cost-cutting drive. BBC business editor Simon Jack tells us what has gone wrong for the firm, and Patrick Rioual, banking analyst at the credit ratings business Fitch in Frankfurt, explains how the news is being received in Germany. Also in the programme, the latest evidence shows the pace of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is accelerating, as a new government in Brazil favours development over conservation. Andre Guimaraes is executi...

Greek elections: Centre-right regains power
Greece's centre-right opposition party New Democracy has won the nation's snap general election. With most districts counted, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras admitted defeat to his rival, Kyriakos Mitsotakis. The Greek-born British economist Vicky Pryce explains where the country’s economy needs to go from here. Also in the show, Deutsche Bank will cut 18,000 jobs over three years as part of a radical reorganisation which will significantly shrink its investment banking business. German banking expert Richard...


Families demand accountability for Boeing 737-Max crashes
Relatives of the 157 people, killed in a Boeing 737-Max airliner crash in Ethiopia in March have told the BBC they believe the plane-maker had put its desire for profits ahead of the safety of their loved ones. The loss of Ethiopian Airlines' flight ET302 in March was the second fatal accident involving a 737 Max in the space of five months. The BBC’s Simon Browning has been investigating the timeline of events Also, the KickStart Money initiative has introduced financial literacy classes to primary-age stu...

Amazon at 25
As the world's largest retailer hits 25, we look at its practices and examine the future. Miya Knights is author of 'Amazon: How the World's Most Relentless Retailer Will Continue to Revolutionize Commerce', and discusses where the firm is headed. Nick Strauss was one of the company's first employees, and reflects on what working there was like in the early days. Cristina Rios manages central London bookshop Houseman's, and explains how the business has adapted to competition from Amazon. And we ask Minneso...


Update: The insider's guide to the US banking system
We hear about the essential workings of the US's banking and economic system from Dr Loretta Mester, chief executive of the Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank. Plus, Susan Schmidt from Aviva gives us the latest on the stock markets....

The high cost of African mobile data
Africa has the fastest growing mobile data market in the world, but the cost is high. Alastair Jones of New Street Research tells us that a lack of competition in some markets is one of the causes. Nicholas Naidoo from mobile company Vodacom says that data costs could be reduced if analogue television signals were switched off to free up mobile spectrum. And Ridwhan Khan, chief executive of mobile phone manufacturer Mobicel explains the difference between his company's $30 smartphone and a high end Apple iP...

Update: First female set to be boss of Europe's central bank
Christine Lagarde is set to become the new boss of the European Central Bank. We hear the latest controversy surrounding Nike trainers. Plus we hear the latest on the US markets from Brian Dorst at Themis Trading in New Jersey....


The growing commercial interest in women's football
Around the World Cup semi-final there's growing commercial interest in women's football. Tom Corbett is head of sponsorship for Barclays, and tells us why the bank is backing the Football Association Women's Super League in the UK. Marketing Director, Tatiana Stadukhina gives us insight into Budweiser's commercial for the England women's team and Lynsey Douglas of Nielsen Sports discusses whether growing commercial interest translates into getting more people to watch games. And we talk to Wales player, Hel...

Update: Hong Kong chief executive addresses protestors
Police firing tear gas have evicted protesters who stormed and ransacked Hong Kong's parliament. Activists had occupied the Legislative Council (LegCo) building for hours after breaking away from a protest on the anniversary of Hong Kong's transfer of sovereignty to China from Britain. The chief executive of Hong Kong, Carrie Lam, held a press conference to reassure people the draft bill that provoked the reaction will not return. Also on the show, we'll have a view on the day's trading in the US with Peter...

The impact of the Sony Walkman
Dr Steve Caplin is a technology author, and explains the history of the world's first portable music player. Gennaro Castaldo is communications director at the British Phonographic Industry, and tells us how Sony failed to capitalise on the emergence of digital music. And we ask two children to try and figure out how to make a Walkman work. Also in the programme, the Kenyan business community is mourning the death of Bob Collymore, chief executive of the mobile phone giant Safaricom. BBC Africa business edi...


OPEC agree on need to extend oil production cuts
The Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih has said that members of the oil cartel the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have agreed on the need to extend oil production cuts, though they remain undecided whether it needs to be for six or nine months. David Fyfe at the Argus group and Ellen Wald of the Atlantic Council weigh in on the cartel’s strategy and larger politics going on. Also in the show, the European Union has signed a landmark free trade deal with Vietnam on Sunday, paving the way fo...

Update: EU and Mercosur agree trade deal after 20-year talks
The EU and South American economic bloc Mercosur have clinched a huge trade deal after 20 years of negotiations.EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker said it was the EU's biggest deal to date and, at a time of trade tensions between the US and China, showed that "we stand for rules-based trade".The BBC's Daniel Gallas explains how the deal came to be.We'll also have a regular view on the day's trading in the US with Chris Low of FTN Financial....

How LGBT workplace rights have evolved
We focus on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the workplace. It's the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York, which are seen by many as the start of the modern gay rights movement. John O'Brien was a customer of the Stonewall Inn that night in 1969 and recalls what sparked the protest. Beck Bailey is director of the workplace equality programme at the Human Rights Campaign in Washington, and tells us how gay rights in the workplace have evolved since then, when homo...


Trade will top agenda at G20
As leaders gather for the G20 in Japan, we ask what breakthroughs might emerge on trade. We hear from businesses around the world who have been affected by the US-China trade war. Greg Autry, who served as part of the Trump administration's transition team and supports the president's stance on trade, tells us he thinks Donald Trump should hold his nerve. The director general of the World Trade Organisation, Roberto Azevedo, discusses the complexities of the current trade conflict. And Japanese business lea...

Update: The latest from the financial markets
Shares in the US chipmaker Micron jumped more than 13% on Wednesday when it emerged it has resumed some shipments to Huawei despite a ban on selling products to the Chinese firm. We hear more from Susan Schmidt at Aviva Investors....


Global warming - are young people making change happen?
As Europe faces a heatwave, we meet young people leading the fight against global warming. 11-year-old activist Elliot Powell tells us about his hopes and fears for the environment, and we hear from his mother, Emma, who is one of the organisers of the youth climate movement. And our environment correspondent Matt McGrath tells us whether young people are affecting the climate conversation at a policy level. Also in the programme, workers at Wayfair, the online home goods retailer, are staging a walkout at ...

Update: Latest from the financial markets
In the US, the head of the Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell has warned against bending to ‘short-term political interests’. We hear from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey....

How safe is 5G?
As 5G mobile technology rolls out, some are concerned about potential health risks. Dr Erica Mallery-Blythe has studied the effects of radiation on human health, and tells us there is very little research into the impact of 5G's short wavelength radiation on human biology. Mark Allera is chief executive of mobile carrier EE, one of the first to roll out the technology, and is convinced the new service is safe. Meanwhile Steve Novella, assistant professor of neurology at Yale likens 5G radiation to the elect...


Update: US hits Iran with more sanctions
The new sanctions will deny Iran's leadership access to financial resources and foreign financial institutions, which help them conduct transactions. We ask Barbara Slavin, who directs the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council, whether the latest sanctions will make much difference? Meanwhile, Ebola presents a clear threat to the economies and people of central and east Africa. The death toll in the Democratic Republic of Congo is in excess of 1500. We explore what it means for the countries in ...

The economic impact of Ebola
Amid fears a new outbreak of Ebola is widening in Africa, we look at the economic impact. Dr Kaifala Marah was finance minister of Sierra Leone during the outbreak in 2014, and tells us how his country was affected at the time. Time magazine writer Sally Hayden has just returned from eastern Congo and discusses the efforts underway there to prevent the spread of the disease. And Nebert Rugadya, business editor of Radio One Kampala, in Uganda, describes the chlorinated sprays, temperature checks and health w...

Istanbul mayoral election: Erdogan's ruling AKP loses again
Turkey's ruling party has lost control of Istanbul after a re-run of the city's mayoral election, latest results show. The candidate for the main opposition party, Ekrem Imamoglu, won 54% of the vote with nearly all ballots counted. He won a surprise victory in March which was annulled after the ruling AK party complained of irregularities. The BBC's Cagil Kasapoglu reports on the mood in Istanbul. Then, Jason Tuvey of Capital Economics appraises what the election means for Turkey's economy overall, and Oli...


The business of yoga
As the UN marks International Day of Yoga, we examine the multi-billion dollar industry. Yoga teacher Pippa Richardson explains how demand has been rapidly growing. Rajesh Kotecha is secretary of India's ministry responsible for yoga, and tells us prime minister Narendra Modi attributes never having a day off sick to his yoga practice. And Professor Rohit Deshpande of Harvard Business School in Boston discusses his research into the branding and commercialisation of yoga. Also in the programme, as tensions ...

UK and US arms sales to Saudi Arabia under threat
The Court of Appeal in the UK ruled that the British government must review the way it grants export licences for arms sales to Saudi Arabia - after ruling that current procedures were unlawful. And in the United States the Senate - controlled by the Republican Party - voted to block a US/Saudi arms deal worth 8.1 billion dollars. We assess the political and economic fallout. This has been a confusing week for Canadians who want their government to adopt a more robust environmental policy. On Monday - decl...


The economics of the Africa Cup of Nations
As Egypt prepares to host the Africa Cup of Nations, we look at the economic impact. Professor Simon Chadwick is a sports enterprise expert at Salford University in the UK, and tells us this year could mark a breakthrough moment for the event. Ghana-based sports journalist Michael Oti Adjei discusses the legacy of the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations in his country. And the BBC's Mohammed Kotb in Egypt assesses the preparations across the country for this year's Cup. Also in the programme, as the last men standin...

Slack prepares to list on NY Stock Exchange
The messaging app Slack will list in New York on Thursday valued at around $17bn. The company's chief executive Stewart Butterfield explains the origins of the software. We visit the offices of recruitment firm FouGen, where founder Sandy Idigbe talks us through how they make use of Slack. And Emily Barry of Market Watch explains how the type of direct listing the company is pursuing in New York actually works. Also in the programme, the House of Lords in the UK has held a hearing into European proposals to...

The challenge of electric charging infrastructure
We hear how many rural areas lack the infrastructure to charge electric cars. Mel Shufflebotham is director of the Zap Map, which helps electric car drivers to find the nearest vacant charging point, and discusses the problem. The Mayor of London launches his electric vehicle infrastructure delivery plan. We hear from Christina Calderato of Transport for London, Sinead Lynch Chair of Shell UK, Stephen Richardson of The Connected Kerb and Jeremy Yapp of BEAMA, all of whom have been working with the Mayor. A...


Crash tragedies overshadow Paris Air Show
We report from the Paris Air Show after visiting plane crash sites in Ethiopia, and ask bosses of airlines: what is the future of air travel and how can you fix clear problems still very much present in the minds of many victims? The BBC’s Theo Leggett threads together the bigger picture, after Boeing has again apologised for the two crashes of its 737 Max aircraft. We hear from the boss of Ethiopian Airlines who has hit back at claims his pilots should bear some of the blame for one of those crashes . Also...

Carole Ghosn claims husband's arrest is a 'conspiracy'
Carole Ghosn, the wife of Carlos Ghosn has told the BBC the arrest of the former Nissan and Renault chairman was a conspiracy. Nissan disputes the claim, arguing there is substantial evidence against him. Carole Ghosn, speaking to the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York, explained that she is appealing to Donald Trump to apply pressure over her husband's legal battle. Electricity is being restored gradually to Argentina and Uruguay after a blackout left 48,000,000 people without power. We hear from Natalio C...


Update: UBS chief economist placed on leave over pig comments
The chief economist at UBS has been put on leave after sparking controversy in China by commenting on Chinese pigs with swine fever, though many are puzzled as to what exactly was wrong with what he said. The Financial Times' Stephen Morris explains. And we'll have our regular look at the US markets with Chris Low of FTN Financial in New York....

Swiss women stage national strike for equality
Swiss women are striking today in favour of "more time, more pay, more respect". We talk to Celine Renaud, a Swiss businesswoman who quit her job and set up her own company when she found out a male colleague doing the same work at the same level was being paid more. And we find out more about the level of gender disparity in the country from Adele Thorens, a member of the Swiss Parliament for the Green Party. Also in the programme, a government plan in Tanzania to impose a 25% duty on imports of wigs and h...

Update: US blames Iran for Gulf of Oman explosions
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blamed Iran for "unprovoked attacks" on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman. He said the US had made its assessment based on intelligence about the type of weapons used. Ilan Goldenberg is Middle East Security Director at the Center for New American Security. He tells us what this could mean for the larger geopolitics of the region. Also in the programme, decades-old rent control legislation is under review in New York, with legislators expected to tilt the balance in f...


Explosion of Oil Tankers near Oman
Two oil tankers have been hit by explosions in the Gulf of Oman. Issam Ikirmawi from the BBC Arabic service tells us what we know about the incidents, and how they have affected the oil price. Also in the programme, as London prepares to mark the second anniversary of a deadly fire at Grenfell Tower, we hear from lawyer Jeffrey Goodman of Saltz, Mongeluzzi, Barrett & Bendesky, who's suing three American companies over the blaze. We take a look at the controversial issue of food labelling. Plus our regular e...

Update: Lego searches for an alternative to plastic
Danish toy company Lego is reportedly struggling to come up with a non-petrol based brick.The company has been seeking out ways to create its iconic brick out of a plant-based material, over concerns about the environmental impact of the estimated 75 billion sold annually. Dave Shefick from the website The Brothers Brick has been to Lego's headquarters to try out some of their prototypes. Plus, we'll also have a regular view on the US markets with Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago....

The future of the video games industry
As the biggest event for video games, E3, opens in Los Angeles we look at gaming's future. We hear from Tomaso and Nicolo Portunato, who run the Platform gaming bar in London. And we discuss concerns that gaming can be addictive with Belinda Parmar, who has set up a campaign group called Truth about Tech, and Kieran Holmes-Darby, managing director of Excel Esports, which enters professional teams into hugely popular online competitions including League of Legends and World of Warcraft. Also in the programme...


Congress takes on Big Tech over antitrust
The US Congress has just wrapped up the first day of an investigation into alleged anti-competitive behaviour. Avery Gardiner of the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington DC breaks down what congress is looking to find. Also in the show, we ask whether clothing retailers are doing enough to minimise their environmental impact. Plus we hear about the increasingly widespread use of facial recognition technology in China....

The environmental cost of fast fashion
We ask whether clothing retailers are doing enough to minimise their environmental impact. Jaana Jatyri is chief executive of TrendStop, which analyses big movements retailers need to keep up with, and tells us sustainability is fast becoming a top priority. While Keith James of the sustainability charity WRAP says some retailers are taking steps to prevent waste clothing going to landfill. Also in the programme, Pakistan has introduced sharp tax increases on everyday goods in its latest budget. Yousuf Naza...

Update: Mexico-US deal keeps US markets buoyant
Carmakers are among those stocks doing well as the US postpones tariffs on Mexican goods - we hear about the day's trading from Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago. Plus, we speak to the Nobel Prize-winning professor who says early years education spending has an impact on later generations....


Trump warns on Mexico tariffs
If an immigration deal falters, President Trump says Mexico could still face new tariffs. The BBC's Will Grant in Mexico City explains what is known about the terms of the deal, whilst the former American ambassador to Mexico, Earl Anthony Wayne, tells us the US should not have threatened to disrupt trade to force a deal on immigration. Also in the programme, Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has made his first foreign trip since re-election last month, to the Maldives and Sri Lanka. It's seen by many as ...

Hong Kong protesters oppose extradition bill
Hundreds of thousands of people have demonstrated against China's controversial bill, which would allow suspected criminals to be sent to mainland China to be put on trial. We get the latest from the BBC's Martin Yip. As trade tensions continue between China and the US, we ask whether China's tariffs on its exports of rare earth metals could turn into a complete ban altogether. Jim Kennedy, founder of Three Consulting and a rare earth metal expert, tells us about the implications of this. And as Ethiopia pr...


Russia seeks foreign investors
Kirill Dmitriev is chief executive of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, and tells us what sort of deals are being struck. And we hear from Henry Foy, Moscow bureau chief of the Financial Times, how the house arrest of American businessman Michael Calvey on fraud charges caused the US ambassador to Moscow to stay away from the event. Also in the programme, as the women's football World Cup gets under way in France, sports journalist Florence Lloyd-Hughes discusses the significant disparity in rates of pay ...

Football finance in the spotlight
As football finance hits the headlines, we take a look at how money influences the game. BBC football reporter Simon Stone explains why Manchester City is accused by the European governing body UEFA of having too much money pumped into it by its Abu Dhabi owners. Meanwhile Sepp Blatter, who was the head of the world football governing body FIFA for 17 years, tells us why he's sceptical about the effectiveness of UEFA's financial fair play rules. Also in the programme, a planned tie-up between Fiat Chrysler ...


Xi and Putin meet in Moscow
Russian President Vladimir Putin has called his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping his “dear friend”. The two are meeting in Russia to sign new trade deals and discuss further bilateral investment opportunities. Both leaders expressed admiration for each other, and enthusiasm at the growing relationship between the two countries. Fred Kempe, President of the Atlantic Council in Washington DC, weighs in on how worried the US should be by this budding friendship. Meanwhile, Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute e...

The store bucking the High Street gloom
Topshop owner Arcadia is the latest British retail brand to stumble financially amid a tough trading environment. We explore how the electrical goods chain Richer Sounds is bucking the gloomy trend thanks to its unique ownership structure. Global trade tensions continue to drag on investor sentiment, with India and Mexico being the latest countries targeted by the Trump administration. Our reporter in Delhi explains why the US removal of India's special trading status is concerning. Plus our regular contrib...

Update: World Bank warns of weaker global growth
The global economy is weakening, according to a new assessment from the World Bank. The bank said it now expects growth of 2.6% for 2019 edging up to 2.7% the following year. The World Bank’s Franziska Ohnsorge explains the report to the BBC’s Andrew Walker. Plus, we’ll have a regular Wall Street Update with Mark Kepner at Themis Trading in New Jersey....


Italy prime minister in resignation threat
A political crisis has been averted in Italy after its prime minister threatened to quit. We hear how there has been tension ahead of a looming showdown between the populist government and the European Commission over Italy's debt mountain. Former chief economist and director general of the Italian Treasury Lorenzo Codogno explains the background to Italy's economic difficulties. And Greece's former finance minister Yanis Varoufakis tells us why he thinks the European Union should relax its rules on member ...


Donald Trump UK visit
As President Trump visits the UK we look at the prospect of a potential US-UK trade deal. We hear what businesses looking for a closer partnership across the Atlantic actually want, from Emanuel Adam, director of trade policy for the British American Business Council. While Minette Batters, chair of the UK National Farmers Union, tells us why she has concerns over a potential deal. Also in the programme, we hear from Kenya, where there's a court challenge for the country's central bank, as it wages war on c...

President Trump Visits the UK
Over three days in the UK, the US president will be hosted by royalty and politicians. We look at the political and economic implications. Plus, the London Metal Exchange launches a scheme to make sure all commodities traded are not from sources linked to conflict in Africa. The Hilton Hotel Group is celebrating 100 years in business with a survey of guests asking what they think are the most important events of the last century and we look ahead to the coming week's big economic stories....

Update: Sir Philip Green charged with assault in the US
The British retail tycoon is charged with four counts of misdemeanour assault in Arizona. We speak to Financial Times reporter Kadhim Shubber who's been following the story. And Susan Schmidt, head of Aviva's US equities portfolio management in Chicago, tells us how Trump's newly announced tariffs on Mexican goods affected the day's trading....


Update: Uber posts $1 billion loss in first quarter
The ride-hailing company posts its first figures after its IPO earlier this month. We ask Professor Annabelle Gawer, director of the Centre of Digital Economy, whether Uber will ever be profitable....

Brazil's economy contracts
Brazil's economy contracted for the first time since 2016, raising fears of a recession. Our South America business reporter Daniel Gallas has been talking to factory workers and farmers to explain what's gone wrong for President Bolsonaro's government, and we get wider context from Fiona Mackie, head of Latin America and Caribbean regions at the Economist Intelligence Unit. Also in the programme, Boeing has admitted it 'fell short' when it failed to implement a safety alert system on the 737 Max plane. Our...


Nigeria's President Buhari sworn in for second term
We look at Nigeria's economic pressures as President Buhari is sworn in for a second term. One of Mr Buhari's electoral challengers Obadiah Mailafia tells us the president has made some progress on tackling corruption. But Akin Olawore, who runs an estate agency in Lagos, and chairs the Nigerian-British Chamber of Commerce, says regular power cuts are still a big problem. And economist Dr Nonso Obikili of the Turgot Centre for Economics and Policy Research discusses concerns that Nigeria's central bank has ...

Update: US opioid court case starts
The US state of Oklahoma starts the first court case against a drug company they say helped cause the opioid addiction crisis. Plus we get the latest from the financial markets....


Update: Renault looks to merge with Fiat
Carmakers have faced pressure to consolidate amid major industry shifts, including towards electric vehicles. The BBC's Roger Hearing talks to Sven Beiker, founder of Silicon Valley Mobility, a transport consultancy in Palo Alto, California....

Fiat Chrysler proposes merger with Renault
Fiat Chrysler of the US and Italy has proposed a merger with French carmaker Renault. It would create the world's third biggest auto company, and motoring journalist Vicky Parrott tells us what the proposed tie up indicates about the global motor industry. Also in the programme, as established centrist parties lose ground in European parliamentary elections, we ask if business is any clearer about Brexit as a result. Guntram Wolff is a European economist and director of the Brussels-based think tank Bruegel...

European Election Special
With polls from the European Parliamentary election closed across the continent, we get live reaction to the results with Ryan Heath, Political Editor at Politico Europe. We'll then have analysis from Georgina Wright of the Institute for Government in London, and EU policy journalist Jennifer Baker in Brussels. We'll also hear reaction from voters in a bar in Madrid, and hear about what this election might mean for Italy's budget problems....


Theresa May quits: UK set for new PM
An emotional Theresa May confirmed she would step down as Tory leader on 7 June. We ask whether the selection of a new prime minister brings the possibility of a no-deal Brexit a step closer. Brexit supporter Tim Martin is the founder of a UK chain of 900 pubs called Wetherspoons, and gives us his reaction. And we also speak with Dr Adam Marshall, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, who is not a fan of a no-deal Brexit. Also in the programme, after India's prime minister Narendra Modi has ...

The case for expensive infrastructure projects
We ask whether high speed rail links are worth the large sums of money they cost to build. There's concern that a planned $70bn high speed rail line in the UK may go way over budget. The chief executive of the HS2 line, Mark Thurston, responds to criticism of the project. And professor Germa Bel, an expert on transport and infrastructure at the University of Barcelona tells us about challenges that high speed rail has faced in Spain. Also in the programme, Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has won re-elec...


Amazon heads off facial recognition rebellion
The global internet giant Amazon has just won a first round in what's turning out to be a battle over the ethics of selling facial recognition technology to national governments. We hear from Mary Beth Gallagher from the director of Tri-State Coalition for Responsible Investment - a membership coalition of Catholic institutional investors and the Sisters of St. Joseph. One of their members hold shares in Amazon and were the lead proponent of the resolution. As electric transportation begins to catch on, we ...

Britain's second biggest steel company collapses
Britain's second biggest steel producer, British Steel, has been put into liquidation, leaving 5,000 jobs at risk, and endangering another 20,000 in the supply chain. Carys Roberts is chief economist at left wing think tank the Institute for Public Policy Research, and explains the pressures British Steel has been under. As electric transportation begins to catch on, we look at the infrastructure required. Making it possible for electric buses to just plug in and go sometimes requires a power storage batter...

India's education challenges
Whoever wins the Indian election will face an economic slowdown and an education crisis. The BBC's Anu Anand is in New Delhi, finding out about a shortage of universities in India. We hear about the pressures that Indian students are under to get top grades to get into the best universities, and meet some of the private tutors helping them to achieve that. Those pressures have led to many students taking their own lives in recent years. Abdul Mahmood explains why he set up two helplines to try and prevent s...


Update: Ford to cut 7,000 jobs
Ford Motor Company is axing thousands of jobs to prepare for a future where the automotive industry will focus on hybrid, electric cars and autonomous vehicles. We hear analysis from Rebecca Lindland, who's followed developments in the automotive industry for more than 20 years. Game of Thrones comes to end, but what does the future hold for the many online entrepreneurs who run websites for fans of the television series? We hear from Gil Kidron, a writer who started a channel on YouTube about the Game of T...

Google restricts Huawei's use of Android
New designs of Huawei smartphones are set to lose access to some Google apps. Ben Wood from the technology analysts CCS Insight explains the background. And we hear the likely impact on Huawei phone users from Augustin Reyna, director of legal and economic affairs at the European consumer organisation, BEUC. Also in the programme, Volodomyr Zelensky has been sworn in as president of Ukraine. Irena Taranyuk of the BBC Ukrainian service describes the economic challenges Mr Zelensky is likely to face, and Aiva...

Google 'restricts Huawei's use of Android'
Google has cut phone maker Huawei off from some updates to the Android operating system, Reuters reports. New smartphones made by the company will also lose access to Google's app store and software such as Gmail, the news agency's story says. Larry Magid is a technology analyst for CBS News and explains what's lead to this move. Also in the show, Ukraine’s incoming President Volodymyr Zelenskiy will be inaugurated Monday. The consensus is that he will face a tough uphill battle in turning the country’s ec...


India builds a new port
A new deep water container port is being built in Kerala, India, but it's heavily delayed. We speak to Karan Adani, chief executive of Adani Ports, and hear from a boat owner and fish vendors concerned for their livelihoods. And we meet transgender workers on the Kochi metro in Kerala. Also in the programme, our reporter in Tel Aviv, Israel, discusses threats of boycotts and a struggle to sell expensive tickets for this weekend's Eurovision Song Contest....


What next for Boeing?
Following two Boeing 737 Max jet crashes we consider the future for the plane maker. Mary Schiavo is a former inspector general at the US Department of Transportation, and considers the relationship between Boeing and America's aviation watchdog the FAA. And Leon Grunberg, professor emeritus of sociology at Puget Sound University in Washington discusses how the culture at Boeing has changed over the past few decades. Also in the programme, we look at the economic arguments ahead of this weekend's election i...

Update: Boeing under further scrutiny
Aviation giant Boeing faces further scrutiny over one of its models crashing - aviation expert Sally Gethin tells us more. Also, birth rates in the US are falling - we hear the reason why and if it is reversible. And Susan Schmidt from Aviva in the US updates us on the day's stock market progress....

Paris conference seeks curbs on internet terror
Governments and internet firms are meeting to try and curb the spread of extremism online. Luca Collacciani of cybersecurity firm Akamai tells us how difficult it can be to police online material. Scott Carpenter of Jigsaw, a Google company which develops technology to tackle violence on the internet, explains how their service works. And Tel Aviv-based lawyer Nitsana Darshan-Leitner discusses legal action she's taking in the United States against social media companies on behalf of victims of terrorist att...


Update: Saudi oil attacks and US stock markets
We hear the context around attacks on Saudi oil sites, from the Financial Times's Anjli Raval. Plus, Jo Saluzzi from Themis trading gives us the day's movers and losers on the US stock markets....

India's jobs challenge
Unemployment in India is a key issue in the country's ongoing general election. The BBC's Anu Anand reports from Delhi on the economic challenges the country faces, and how the unemployment rate might be brought down from 45-year highs. We meet a number of low-paid workers who are looking for better jobs, and explore the wider context for employment with Sabina Dewan, president of the JustJobs Network, and Goutam Das, senior editor at Business Today. Also in the programme, our reporter examines why leather ...


US will suffer from tariffs, Trump aide Larry Kudlow admits
One of Donald Trump's top economic advisers has acknowledged the president was wrong to suggest that China would pay tariffs on its exports to the US. Larry Kudlow, who heads the National Economic Council, accepted it was US businesses that paid the import tax. Heather Long, the economics correspondent at the Washington Post, explains what this means for the ongoing trade talks. Cuba has announced rationing of more products amid shortages it blames on the US trade embargo and hoarders. There have been hour...

Uber shares sink on stock market debut
Uber shares slid to close 7.6% down on their first day of trading, as the highly anticipated share market listing failed to win over investors. We get analysis from Jon Swartz, who covers Silicon Valley for Barron's magazine. President Trump says trade talks with China will continue even after the US increased border tariffs on Chinese imports on Friday. Meanwhile, companies around the world are trying to work out what the new tariffs mean for them. Luisa Santos of Business Europe, an organisation that repr...

UK has first coal-free week for a century
The UK went more than a week without coal to produce electricity, setting a new record. We consider the future for the fossil fuel with Melissa Brown of the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, who tells us the US has just generated more electricity from renewables than coal for the first time. And we hear about Germany's coal reduction plan from German Green MEP Sven Giegold. Also in the programme, ride-hailing firm Uber is to list its shares on the New York Stock Exchange today. We get a...


Uber float values company at $82bn
Uber has set a price for floating its shares on the New York Stock Exchange, in what is expected to be one of the biggest stock market flotations of the year. We get reaction from Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York. In just a few hours' time the US is due to impose new trade tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. Talks on a possible trade deal continue, even as the US accused China of reneging on commitments it has made so far in the talks. Will they succeed? We hear from Erin Ennis of t...

ANC leads as South Africa votes counted
South Africa's ruling ANC look set to win re-election with a reduced majority. We look at the health of the country's economy, with Anne Burnstein from the Centre for Development and Enterprise, as well as the challenges of tackling youth unemployment, with young graduates Sihle Ndimba and Rodrique Kwete. Also in the programme, trade talks between the United States and China are restarting in Washington, DC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker discusses the likelihood of the sides reaching a deal. Plu...

US orders new sanctions on Iranian metals
As President Trump orders new sanctions on Iran's industrial metals industry, we ask what this means for future diplomatic relations between the two countries, and speak to Dr Sanam Vakil, senior research fellow at policy institute Chatham House. Scott Nations of Nations Shares in Chicago explains how the US markets reacted to the news. And, Scotland prepares to introduce a 20p deposit on bottles to boost recycling rates and cut waste. We speak to the Scottish Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham....


Uber drivers strike over pay and conditions
Drivers working for digital taxi app Uber have gone on strike in cities around the world. Driver Muhumed Ali tells us why he's joining the protest, and we hear more from James Farrar, general secretary of the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain, which is organising it. And with Uber's New York stock market flotation due on Friday, Shira Ovide of Bloomberg discusses whether the company is ever likely to make a profit. Also in the programme, South Africa's election is under way, and our reporter Matthe...

US blocks climate change declaration at Arctic Council
The US refused to sign any declaration mentioning climate change at the Arctic Council. We ask what next for the group of nations bordering the Arctic Circle. Peter Winsor is director of the WWF Arctic Programme, and we also hear from Arild Moe, a research professor at the Fridtjof Nansen Institute. Also in the programme, with the US economy growing strongly, we consider the likely impact on next year's presidential election, with our regular US economic commentator Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute. Pl...


Update:US Treasury Secretary says talks with China have gone backward
Major stock markets have been hit after US President Trump threatened new China tariffs. Mary Lovely, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, tells us why President Trump might be threatening higher tariffs, and we'll also get US reaction from Peter Jankovskis at Oakbrook Investments in Chicago. Also in the programme, South Africa heads to the polls on Wednesday, and we hear how tackling unemployment is a key issue in the election. We meet an entrepreneur who set up his own bu...

Shares hit by Trump tariff threat to China
Major stockmarkets have been hit after US President Trump threatened new China tariffs. Simon Rabinovitch is Asia economics editor at The Economist in China, and tells us about the impact there, whilst we also get US reaction from Susan Schmidt, head of US equities at Aviva Investors. Also in the programme, South Africa heads to the polls on Wednesday, and we hear how tackling unemployment is a key issue in the election. We meet an entrepreneur who set up his own business to deal with joblessness, and Busis...

Trump threatens to raise tariffs against China
US President Donald Trump has said he will raise tariffs on $200bn of Chinese goods because talks on a US-China trade deal are moving "too slowly". The US president tweeted that tariffs of 10% on certain goods would rise to 25% on Friday, and $325bn of untaxed goods could face 25% duties "shortly". The BBC’s Chris Buckler has the latest from Washington. Tariffs aren’t the only thing on President Trump’s mind going into the week. Monday is the deadline for the Treasury Department to decide whether or not to...


Venezuela opposition calls for general strike
Venezuela's opposition leader Juan Guaido has called for a general strike. We assess how what was once south America's richest nation descended into chaos, with hyperinflation and a virtually worthless currency. We hear from Venezuelan oil analyst Paola Rodriguez-Maisu, and get wider context from Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez of Northwestern University in the US, who also advises on the risks of investing in Latin American countries. Also in the programme, there's a new crackdown in Kenya on advertising by bett...

Iran oil: US sanctions exemptions expire
Exemptions to US oil sanctions for importers still buying from Iran have ended. Sara Vakshari, an Iranian oil analyst at the SVB energy consultancy, tells us oil prices may rise as a result. We hear about the impact on investment in Iran from Cyril Razzhagi, who runs the Iranian inward investment consultancy ARAD. And we get the historical perspective on oil sanctions from Elizabeth Rosenberg, a former US treasury official who directs the energy programme at US think tank the Centre for American Security. A...


Japan's new emperor Naruhito takes throne
The enthronement in Japan of Emperor Naruhito has kicked off a new era in the country. We assess the health of Japan's economy with economist Yoko Ishikura. And the former boss of Japanese electronics giant Olympus, Michael Woodford, tells us how he thinks Japan can recover its economic mojo. Also in the programme, following recent widespread environmental protests in the UK, British MPs have been debating whether to declare a so-called climate emergency. The environmental campaigner George Monbiot tells us...

Apple reports steep drop in Iphone sales
Sales of its smartphone dropped more sharply than ever in the January-March quarter, falling by more than 17 percent. We hear what this could mean for the future of Apple from Connie Guglielmo, editor in chief of technology website CNet, in San Francisco. Our reporter James Reynolds reports from Rome as Italy prepares to roll out its universal citizens’ income. Plus we travel to India to meet the women who created their own feminine hygiene product industry in the slums of Mumbai....

Italy emerges from recession
Italy has emerged from recession as growth across the wider European Union accelerated. Italian economist Mariana Mazzucato of University College London tells us what's behind the improved economic picture. Also in the programme, as Apple unveils its latest financial figures, technology analyst Stephanie Hare tells us what the technology giant might look like ten years from now. Plus we travel to India to meet the women who created their own feminine products industry in the slums of Mumbai. (Picture: An It...


Spain elections: Socialists win most votes
Javier Dias-Himenez is an economics professor at the IESE Business School in Madrid, and tells us radical economic reform could be on the agenda, depending on what coalition emerges. And we get business reaction to the results from Carlos Ravadulla, founder of an eco-friendly cleaning business in Barcelona called Ecofrego. Also in the programme, private business is playing an increasing role in space exploration. We hear about some of the opportunities from Chad Anderson, chief executive of Space Angels, a ...

Spain holds general election
In Spain's latest general election, Prime Minister, Pedro Sánchez's party polled 29% and will need the help of either left-wing Podemos and regional parties or the centre right to form a government. Also, for the first time since military rule ended in the 1970s, a far-right party is set to enter parliament. We hear from the BBC's Katie Silver in Madrid. Economist Holger Schmieding tells us what impact the Spanish elections might have on the country's economy. We explore land rights in Africa where schools,...

US growth rate beats expectations
The US economy grew at an annualised rate of 3.2% in the first three months of the year. Our reporter in New York tells us what's behind the latest figures, which were better than had been forecast. Also in the programme, ride-hailing firm Uber has revealed it hopes to be worth up to $91bn in an upcoming stock market flotation. Adam Lashinsky, author of Wild Ride: Inside Uber's Quest for World Domination, explains why the valuation is lower than expected. With reports that one of the biggest genealogy websi...


China showcases Belt and Road initiative to world leaders
World leaders are gathering in Beijing from Thursday for a summit on China's Belt and Road initiative amid growing criticism of the project. The sweeping infrastructure project aims to expand global trade links. The initiative has funded trains, roads, and ports in many countries, but has left some saddled with debt. Dr. Yu Jie of Chatham House explains what how China's President Xi will be looking to use this summit to bolster support. Also in the show, Brazil's indigenous people have been protesting the c...

The challenges for Brazil's indigenous people
Brazil's indigenous people have been protesting the country's business-friendly leaders. Our reporter in Brasilia has been speaking with some of those who have taken to the streets. And Sarah Schenker of campaign group Survival International explains concerns that the government is pushing for commercial mining and fishing on indigenous reserves. Also in the programme, we examine the arguments for and against legally enforceable rent controls in cities. Plus with the scaly pangolin named as the world's most...

Boeing in dark over cost of jet groundings
Boeing does not know how the crisis over safety of its 737 Max jets will affect profits. Aviation analyst Sally Gethin discusses the plane maker's latest financial figures. We find out how significant Boeing is to the local economy in Seattle, Washington, where the firm is based, from professor Leon Grunberg of the University of Puget Sound in Washington, and professor Amy Edmondson of Harvard University assesses whether the pressure of orders for 737 Max planes led to an oversight in their production. Also...


Update: SnapChat beats expectations
Snap, the owner of photo based app SnapChat, has reported good financial health. Jo Saluzzi of Themis Trading gives us an update on the stock markets....

Twitter users and revenue up
The social media giant Twitter has attracted more users, and earnings are up significantly. But the firm is still mired in controversy over the amount of hate speech on the platform. We hear from women who have suffered abuse and find out more about founder Jack Dorsey's plans to tackle the problem. The fashion industry has been criticised by MPs in the UK as a major source of the greenhouse gases that are overheating the planet. But just how easy is it to produce more sustainable clothes in an age of ‘fast...

US to end sanction exemptions for major importers
US President Donald Trump has decided to end exemptions from sanctions for countries still buying oil from Iran. The White House said waivers for China, India, Japan, South Korea and Turkey would expire in May, after which they could face US sanctions themselves. We speak to Suzanne Maloney from the Brookings Institute. Samsung has postponed the release of its folding smartphone, days after several early reviewers said the screens on their devices had broken. The BBC's technology reporter discusses what th...


Samsung postpones the launch of its new folding-screen mobile phone
Samsung has postponed the release of its folding smartphone, days after several early reviewers said the screens on their devices had broken. The BBC's Technology Reporter Chris Fox explains. Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has scored a landslide victory in the country's presidential election. In a case of life imitating art, on television Zelensky has played the part of a teacher who accidently becomes president. The price of oil has risen after President Trump confirmed the US would end sanction wai...

Comedian wins Ukranian presidential election
Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has scored a landslide victory in the country's presidential election. In a case of life imitating art, on television Zelensky has played the part of a teacher who accidentally becomes president. The price of oil has risen after President Trump confirmed the US would end sanction waivers for buyers of Iranian oil. The BBC's Andrew Walker explains the implications. An outbreak of African Swine Fever has hit pig farms in China, so consumers around the world could soon be ...

Comedian Wins Ukraine's Vote
Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has won a landslide victory in the country's presidential election, exit polls suggest. Uganda re-launches its national carrier - but will an all new Uganda Air soar? And a petition is almost complete in the Netherlands, intended to criminalise prostitution. Plus a 209 carat diamond, as big and heavy as a golf ball, goes up for auction....


Threat of tariffs looms over New York Auto Show
The New York Auto Show begins today, with the threat of new tariffs being held over the international car industry by President Donald Trump. The BBC's Michelle Fleury is there. For decades pilots and cabin crew worldwide have been arguing that toxic air on-board the planes they fly has been making them - and passengers - ill. The industry says there’s no such thing as ‘Aerotoxicity', but scientists and doctors have suggested otherwise. The BBC's Mike Powell brings us up to date on this story. Haiti's forei...

Climate Protests: Disobedience or Inconvenience?
Climate protesters Extinction Rebellion have been organising sit-ins on central London streets in an attempt to make their demands heard. But are they realistic in their aims, such as legally binding policies to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2025? And are their disruptive tactics getting more people onside? We speak to activist Kofi Klu, who is taking part, about the power of protest. Reporters Without Borders' World Press Freedom Index is out today, ranking countries on how easy it is to be a jour...

Update: Egypt holds referendum on constitutional changes
Egyptians will vote this weekend on changes which will allow the current president, Abd-al-Fatah al-Sisi, to remain in power until 2030. The referendum will last for three days in an attempt to maximise turnout. We hear from Yehia Hamed, a former Minister for Investment, on what an extended term would mean for the country's economy. And could Nokia claw back some 5G market share from Huawei? Stu Woo of the Wall Street Journal in Beijing tells us more....


China's economic growth beats expectations
China's economy grew slightly faster than expected in the three months from January to March, official figures released Wednesday showed. The economy expanded at 6.4% in the first quarter from a year earlier, ahead of a Reuters forecast of 6.3%. Also in the programme, the troubled Indian airline Jet Airways has suspended all its domestic and international flights after failing to find fresh funding. The airline said its last flight would operate on Wednesday as it was not able to pay for fuel and other cri...